From local legend to annual rodeo | TheFencePost.com

From local legend to annual rodeo

Jody Johnson
Alamosa, Colo.

Over 135 years ago a local family legend began. The Honeycutt/Alsbaugh Family have been a vital part of the San Luis Valley for four generations, beginning in 1873 with Walter and Alice Alsbaugh. At the tender age of 14, Walt began his journey with a small herd of horses and a drive to help support himself and his mother, Virginia after recently losing his father.

He headed East toward Fort Garland then down to San Luis, selling every one of his horses along the way. On his return trip home, on his faithful saddle horse, he was approached by a man who not only offered to buy his horse, but saddle and tack as well. Walt agreed, then realized how far from home he was, over 50 miles. How to get home, and at such a young age! Walt was a very clever lad and decided to purchase two unbroken horses to get him home. But the horses were of course very wild and would not stop bucking, how to calm them down was his next feat.

He finally decided he would latch the two together. After attaching halters to each horse, he tied them together at tail and head, problem solved, or was it? Now the horses had to tug on each other if they chose to buck. Now how would he steer these two? How else, chickens! He bought a couple and used them to scare the horses to go in the direction he needed them to go! I can only imagined how he appeared as he rode through the gates of the family ranch, astride two horses, a couple of chickens and a pocketful of cash, job well done!

Walt started his own world-renowned rodeo company in 1959, called the RCA (Rodeo Cowboy Association). Some of the locals that contributed were, Dave Miller, Roscoe and Mabel Mullins, Hank and Ben Weiscamp, Ed Loman and Truman and Annabelle Painter. This event was announced by Dr. Charles ” Bud” Townsend, entering his 36th year as an announcer – 21 of those years he announced for rodeos and round ups across Colorado. As times do, things changed, but the ticket entry for the Alamosa Round Up have not changed that much. In 1986, tickets for adults were $5.00, today they are $12.00, which is still a good value for a family that wants to enjoy the outdoors and a local tradition!

The Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame inducted ole’ Walt in 1990. Roy Honeycutt, a rodeo cowboy from New Mexico, joined the family in 1963 by marrying Walt’s oldest daughter Virginia. In 1976, the Honeycutt Rodeo Company was born and 32 years later, and four generations, the family tradition continues.

The Honeycutts take great pride in raising many of the bulls and horses used in the rodeo circuit. You can find them running the high plains in the valley today, and on the Alamosa Ranch owned by the family just north of town. Their bulls are raised and kept until they are the perfect match to take on our cowboys … rough enough and tough enough to make a show worth watching!

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The Honeycutt horses and bulls have been lucky to have bucked at 31 of the last 35 National Finals Rodeos … our local legend, came to life! The entire family is extremely proud of their western roots and the heritage the family carries on, from the young man who set out to prove himself and to be the “man” of the house, to today where, in late June, the Honeycutts bring the Annual PRCA sanctioned Alamosa Round Up Rodeo to the valley once again. Join us for a week of great cowboy activities, including a downtown cattle drive, demolition derby, and some great cowboys and bull riders.

Over 135 years ago a local family legend began. The Honeycutt/Alsbaugh Family have been a vital part of the San Luis Valley for four generations, beginning in 1873 with Walter and Alice Alsbaugh. At the tender age of 14, Walt began his journey with a small herd of horses and a drive to help support himself and his mother, Virginia after recently losing his father.

He headed East toward Fort Garland then down to San Luis, selling every one of his horses along the way. On his return trip home, on his faithful saddle horse, he was approached by a man who not only offered to buy his horse, but saddle and tack as well. Walt agreed, then realized how far from home he was, over 50 miles. How to get home, and at such a young age! Walt was a very clever lad and decided to purchase two unbroken horses to get him home. But the horses were of course very wild and would not stop bucking, how to calm them down was his next feat.

He finally decided he would latch the two together. After attaching halters to each horse, he tied them together at tail and head, problem solved, or was it? Now the horses had to tug on each other if they chose to buck. Now how would he steer these two? How else, chickens! He bought a couple and used them to scare the horses to go in the direction he needed them to go! I can only imagined how he appeared as he rode through the gates of the family ranch, astride two horses, a couple of chickens and a pocketful of cash, job well done!

Walt started his own world-renowned rodeo company in 1959, called the RCA (Rodeo Cowboy Association). Some of the locals that contributed were, Dave Miller, Roscoe and Mabel Mullins, Hank and Ben Weiscamp, Ed Loman and Truman and Annabelle Painter. This event was announced by Dr. Charles ” Bud” Townsend, entering his 36th year as an announcer – 21 of those years he announced for rodeos and round ups across Colorado. As times do, things changed, but the ticket entry for the Alamosa Round Up have not changed that much. In 1986, tickets for adults were $5.00, today they are $12.00, which is still a good value for a family that wants to enjoy the outdoors and a local tradition!

The Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame inducted ole’ Walt in 1990. Roy Honeycutt, a rodeo cowboy from New Mexico, joined the family in 1963 by marrying Walt’s oldest daughter Virginia. In 1976, the Honeycutt Rodeo Company was born and 32 years later, and four generations, the family tradition continues.

The Honeycutts take great pride in raising many of the bulls and horses used in the rodeo circuit. You can find them running the high plains in the valley today, and on the Alamosa Ranch owned by the family just north of town. Their bulls are raised and kept until they are the perfect match to take on our cowboys … rough enough and tough enough to make a show worth watching!

The Honeycutt horses and bulls have been lucky to have bucked at 31 of the last 35 National Finals Rodeos … our local legend, came to life! The entire family is extremely proud of their western roots and the heritage the family carries on, from the young man who set out to prove himself and to be the “man” of the house, to today where, in late June, the Honeycutts bring the Annual PRCA sanctioned Alamosa Round Up Rodeo to the valley once again. Join us for a week of great cowboy activities, including a downtown cattle drive, demolition derby, and some great cowboys and bull riders.

Over 135 years ago a local family legend began. The Honeycutt/Alsbaugh Family have been a vital part of the San Luis Valley for four generations, beginning in 1873 with Walter and Alice Alsbaugh. At the tender age of 14, Walt began his journey with a small herd of horses and a drive to help support himself and his mother, Virginia after recently losing his father.

He headed East toward Fort Garland then down to San Luis, selling every one of his horses along the way. On his return trip home, on his faithful saddle horse, he was approached by a man who not only offered to buy his horse, but saddle and tack as well. Walt agreed, then realized how far from home he was, over 50 miles. How to get home, and at such a young age! Walt was a very clever lad and decided to purchase two unbroken horses to get him home. But the horses were of course very wild and would not stop bucking, how to calm them down was his next feat.

He finally decided he would latch the two together. After attaching halters to each horse, he tied them together at tail and head, problem solved, or was it? Now the horses had to tug on each other if they chose to buck. Now how would he steer these two? How else, chickens! He bought a couple and used them to scare the horses to go in the direction he needed them to go! I can only imagined how he appeared as he rode through the gates of the family ranch, astride two horses, a couple of chickens and a pocketful of cash, job well done!

Walt started his own world-renowned rodeo company in 1959, called the RCA (Rodeo Cowboy Association). Some of the locals that contributed were, Dave Miller, Roscoe and Mabel Mullins, Hank and Ben Weiscamp, Ed Loman and Truman and Annabelle Painter. This event was announced by Dr. Charles ” Bud” Townsend, entering his 36th year as an announcer – 21 of those years he announced for rodeos and round ups across Colorado. As times do, things changed, but the ticket entry for the Alamosa Round Up have not changed that much. In 1986, tickets for adults were $5.00, today they are $12.00, which is still a good value for a family that wants to enjoy the outdoors and a local tradition!

The Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame inducted ole’ Walt in 1990. Roy Honeycutt, a rodeo cowboy from New Mexico, joined the family in 1963 by marrying Walt’s oldest daughter Virginia. In 1976, the Honeycutt Rodeo Company was born and 32 years later, and four generations, the family tradition continues.

The Honeycutts take great pride in raising many of the bulls and horses used in the rodeo circuit. You can find them running the high plains in the valley today, and on the Alamosa Ranch owned by the family just north of town. Their bulls are raised and kept until they are the perfect match to take on our cowboys … rough enough and tough enough to make a show worth watching!

The Honeycutt horses and bulls have been lucky to have bucked at 31 of the last 35 National Finals Rodeos … our local legend, came to life! The entire family is extremely proud of their western roots and the heritage the family carries on, from the young man who set out to prove himself and to be the “man” of the house, to today where, in late June, the Honeycutts bring the Annual PRCA sanctioned Alamosa Round Up Rodeo to the valley once again. Join us for a week of great cowboy activities, including a downtown cattle drive, demolition derby, and some great cowboys and bull riders.

Over 135 years ago a local family legend began. The Honeycutt/Alsbaugh Family have been a vital part of the San Luis Valley for four generations, beginning in 1873 with Walter and Alice Alsbaugh. At the tender age of 14, Walt began his journey with a small herd of horses and a drive to help support himself and his mother, Virginia after recently losing his father.

He headed East toward Fort Garland then down to San Luis, selling every one of his horses along the way. On his return trip home, on his faithful saddle horse, he was approached by a man who not only offered to buy his horse, but saddle and tack as well. Walt agreed, then realized how far from home he was, over 50 miles. How to get home, and at such a young age! Walt was a very clever lad and decided to purchase two unbroken horses to get him home. But the horses were of course very wild and would not stop bucking, how to calm them down was his next feat.

He finally decided he would latch the two together. After attaching halters to each horse, he tied them together at tail and head, problem solved, or was it? Now the horses had to tug on each other if they chose to buck. Now how would he steer these two? How else, chickens! He bought a couple and used them to scare the horses to go in the direction he needed them to go! I can only imagined how he appeared as he rode through the gates of the family ranch, astride two horses, a couple of chickens and a pocketful of cash, job well done!

Walt started his own world-renowned rodeo company in 1959, called the RCA (Rodeo Cowboy Association). Some of the locals that contributed were, Dave Miller, Roscoe and Mabel Mullins, Hank and Ben Weiscamp, Ed Loman and Truman and Annabelle Painter. This event was announced by Dr. Charles ” Bud” Townsend, entering his 36th year as an announcer – 21 of those years he announced for rodeos and round ups across Colorado. As times do, things changed, but the ticket entry for the Alamosa Round Up have not changed that much. In 1986, tickets for adults were $5.00, today they are $12.00, which is still a good value for a family that wants to enjoy the outdoors and a local tradition!

The Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame inducted ole’ Walt in 1990. Roy Honeycutt, a rodeo cowboy from New Mexico, joined the family in 1963 by marrying Walt’s oldest daughter Virginia. In 1976, the Honeycutt Rodeo Company was born and 32 years later, and four generations, the family tradition continues.

The Honeycutts take great pride in raising many of the bulls and horses used in the rodeo circuit. You can find them running the high plains in the valley today, and on the Alamosa Ranch owned by the family just north of town. Their bulls are raised and kept until they are the perfect match to take on our cowboys … rough enough and tough enough to make a show worth watching!

The Honeycutt horses and bulls have been lucky to have bucked at 31 of the last 35 National Finals Rodeos … our local legend, came to life! The entire family is extremely proud of their western roots and the heritage the family carries on, from the young man who set out to prove himself and to be the “man” of the house, to today where, in late June, the Honeycutts bring the Annual PRCA sanctioned Alamosa Round Up Rodeo to the valley once again. Join us for a week of great cowboy activities, including a downtown cattle drive, demolition derby, and some great cowboys and bull riders.

Over 135 years ago a local family legend began. The Honeycutt/Alsbaugh Family have been a vital part of the San Luis Valley for four generations, beginning in 1873 with Walter and Alice Alsbaugh. At the tender age of 14, Walt began his journey with a small herd of horses and a drive to help support himself and his mother, Virginia after recently losing his father.

He headed East toward Fort Garland then down to San Luis, selling every one of his horses along the way. On his return trip home, on his faithful saddle horse, he was approached by a man who not only offered to buy his horse, but saddle and tack as well. Walt agreed, then realized how far from home he was, over 50 miles. How to get home, and at such a young age! Walt was a very clever lad and decided to purchase two unbroken horses to get him home. But the horses were of course very wild and would not stop bucking, how to calm them down was his next feat.

He finally decided he would latch the two together. After attaching halters to each horse, he tied them together at tail and head, problem solved, or was it? Now the horses had to tug on each other if they chose to buck. Now how would he steer these two? How else, chickens! He bought a couple and used them to scare the horses to go in the direction he needed them to go! I can only imagined how he appeared as he rode through the gates of the family ranch, astride two horses, a couple of chickens and a pocketful of cash, job well done!

Walt started his own world-renowned rodeo company in 1959, called the RCA (Rodeo Cowboy Association). Some of the locals that contributed were, Dave Miller, Roscoe and Mabel Mullins, Hank and Ben Weiscamp, Ed Loman and Truman and Annabelle Painter. This event was announced by Dr. Charles ” Bud” Townsend, entering his 36th year as an announcer – 21 of those years he announced for rodeos and round ups across Colorado. As times do, things changed, but the ticket entry for the Alamosa Round Up have not changed that much. In 1986, tickets for adults were $5.00, today they are $12.00, which is still a good value for a family that wants to enjoy the outdoors and a local tradition!

The Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame inducted ole’ Walt in 1990. Roy Honeycutt, a rodeo cowboy from New Mexico, joined the family in 1963 by marrying Walt’s oldest daughter Virginia. In 1976, the Honeycutt Rodeo Company was born and 32 years later, and four generations, the family tradition continues.

The Honeycutts take great pride in raising many of the bulls and horses used in the rodeo circuit. You can find them running the high plains in the valley today, and on the Alamosa Ranch owned by the family just north of town. Their bulls are raised and kept until they are the perfect match to take on our cowboys … rough enough and tough enough to make a show worth watching!

The Honeycutt horses and bulls have been lucky to have bucked at 31 of the last 35 National Finals Rodeos … our local legend, came to life! The entire family is extremely proud of their western roots and the heritage the family carries on, from the young man who set out to prove himself and to be the “man” of the house, to today where, in late June, the Honeycutts bring the Annual PRCA sanctioned Alamosa Round Up Rodeo to the valley once again. Join us for a week of great cowboy activities, including a downtown cattle drive, demolition derby, and some great cowboys and bull riders.

Over 135 years ago a local family legend began. The Honeycutt/Alsbaugh Family have been a vital part of the San Luis Valley for four generations, beginning in 1873 with Walter and Alice Alsbaugh. At the tender age of 14, Walt began his journey with a small herd of horses and a drive to help support himself and his mother, Virginia after recently losing his father.

He headed East toward Fort Garland then down to San Luis, selling every one of his horses along the way. On his return trip home, on his faithful saddle horse, he was approached by a man who not only offered to buy his horse, but saddle and tack as well. Walt agreed, then realized how far from home he was, over 50 miles. How to get home, and at such a young age! Walt was a very clever lad and decided to purchase two unbroken horses to get him home. But the horses were of course very wild and would not stop bucking, how to calm them down was his next feat.

He finally decided he would latch the two together. After attaching halters to each horse, he tied them together at tail and head, problem solved, or was it? Now the horses had to tug on each other if they chose to buck. Now how would he steer these two? How else, chickens! He bought a couple and used them to scare the horses to go in the direction he needed them to go! I can only imagined how he appeared as he rode through the gates of the family ranch, astride two horses, a couple of chickens and a pocketful of cash, job well done!

Walt started his own world-renowned rodeo company in 1959, called the RCA (Rodeo Cowboy Association). Some of the locals that contributed were, Dave Miller, Roscoe and Mabel Mullins, Hank and Ben Weiscamp, Ed Loman and Truman and Annabelle Painter. This event was announced by Dr. Charles ” Bud” Townsend, entering his 36th year as an announcer – 21 of those years he announced for rodeos and round ups across Colorado. As times do, things changed, but the ticket entry for the Alamosa Round Up have not changed that much. In 1986, tickets for adults were $5.00, today they are $12.00, which is still a good value for a family that wants to enjoy the outdoors and a local tradition!

The Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame inducted ole’ Walt in 1990. Roy Honeycutt, a rodeo cowboy from New Mexico, joined the family in 1963 by marrying Walt’s oldest daughter Virginia. In 1976, the Honeycutt Rodeo Company was born and 32 years later, and four generations, the family tradition continues.

The Honeycutts take great pride in raising many of the bulls and horses used in the rodeo circuit. You can find them running the high plains in the valley today, and on the Alamosa Ranch owned by the family just north of town. Their bulls are raised and kept until they are the perfect match to take on our cowboys … rough enough and tough enough to make a show worth watching!

The Honeycutt horses and bulls have been lucky to have bucked at 31 of the last 35 National Finals Rodeos … our local legend, came to life! The entire family is extremely proud of their western roots and the heritage the family carries on, from the young man who set out to prove himself and to be the “man” of the house, to today where, in late June, the Honeycutts bring the Annual PRCA sanctioned Alamosa Round Up Rodeo to the valley once again. Join us for a week of great cowboy activities, including a downtown cattle drive, demolition derby, and some great cowboys and bull riders.

Over 135 years ago a local family legend began. The Honeycutt/Alsbaugh Family have been a vital part of the San Luis Valley for four generations, beginning in 1873 with Walter and Alice Alsbaugh. At the tender age of 14, Walt began his journey with a small herd of horses and a drive to help support himself and his mother, Virginia after recently losing his father.

He headed East toward Fort Garland then down to San Luis, selling every one of his horses along the way. On his return trip home, on his faithful saddle horse, he was approached by a man who not only offered to buy his horse, but saddle and tack as well. Walt agreed, then realized how far from home he was, over 50 miles. How to get home, and at such a young age! Walt was a very clever lad and decided to purchase two unbroken horses to get him home. But the horses were of course very wild and would not stop bucking, how to calm them down was his next feat.

He finally decided he would latch the two together. After attaching halters to each horse, he tied them together at tail and head, problem solved, or was it? Now the horses had to tug on each other if they chose to buck. Now how would he steer these two? How else, chickens! He bought a couple and used them to scare the horses to go in the direction he needed them to go! I can only imagined how he appeared as he rode through the gates of the family ranch, astride two horses, a couple of chickens and a pocketful of cash, job well done!

Walt started his own world-renowned rodeo company in 1959, called the RCA (Rodeo Cowboy Association). Some of the locals that contributed were, Dave Miller, Roscoe and Mabel Mullins, Hank and Ben Weiscamp, Ed Loman and Truman and Annabelle Painter. This event was announced by Dr. Charles ” Bud” Townsend, entering his 36th year as an announcer – 21 of those years he announced for rodeos and round ups across Colorado. As times do, things changed, but the ticket entry for the Alamosa Round Up have not changed that much. In 1986, tickets for adults were $5.00, today they are $12.00, which is still a good value for a family that wants to enjoy the outdoors and a local tradition!

The Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame inducted ole’ Walt in 1990. Roy Honeycutt, a rodeo cowboy from New Mexico, joined the family in 1963 by marrying Walt’s oldest daughter Virginia. In 1976, the Honeycutt Rodeo Company was born and 32 years later, and four generations, the family tradition continues.

The Honeycutts take great pride in raising many of the bulls and horses used in the rodeo circuit. You can find them running the high plains in the valley today, and on the Alamosa Ranch owned by the family just north of town. Their bulls are raised and kept until they are the perfect match to take on our cowboys … rough enough and tough enough to make a show worth watching!

The Honeycutt horses and bulls have been lucky to have bucked at 31 of the last 35 National Finals Rodeos … our local legend, came to life! The entire family is extremely proud of their western roots and the heritage the family carries on, from the young man who set out to prove himself and to be the “man” of the house, to today where, in late June, the Honeycutts bring the Annual PRCA sanctioned Alamosa Round Up Rodeo to the valley once again. Join us for a week of great cowboy activities, including a downtown cattle drive, demolition derby, and some great cowboys and bull riders.