Fruita’s Farm and Ranch Days | TheFencePost.com

Fruita’s Farm and Ranch Days

Margaret Melloy GuziakCrowd chowing down on free delicious hamburgers and hot dogs

At the third annual Farm and Ranch Days in Fruita, Colo., on March 13, Leah Reynolds had one of the many fun and informational booths. Penned up behind her tented booth were four of her alpacas, attracting many onlookers to observe and pet the gentle animals raised by this knowledgeable elementary school teacher. If you missed her this time, she and her alpacas are regulars at the downtown Farmer’s Market every summer. She enjoys sharing her expertise and can answer any alpaca questions you might have. She and her husband, Dan, own Horse Mountain Alpacas.

The Fruita Area Chamber of Commerce, Co-op Country/Ace Hardware, and CSU Extension Service hosted the third annual Farm and Ranch Days. We realize that many small towns across America have their own farm and ranch days to celebrate living in the country.

Even though it wasn’t officially spring, Mid-March is the time to plan gardens, purchase feed or fencing for livestock, find out what’s new in the area, while honoring the old ways of doing things on the farm or in home gardens. What could be more perfect than to meet and chat with neighbors and friends munching free hot dogs and hamburgers, and cups of lemonade or iced tea, while seated on hay bales outdoors in the Colorado sunshine?

As an added bonus, Ernie McHugh, musician and teacher at 8/9 School in Fruita, played country-western tunes on his guitar, entertaining those seated at white tables inside the open tent and those outside perched on the hay bales.

The list of booths goes on and on: Tony Arreola and Wayne Fry, employees of the Grand Valley Drainage District, handed out maps for Division 1, 2 and 3 to those who inquired. The District was started in 1915 and continues today to get rid of ground water seepage. For more information, please call (970) 242-4343 or write P.O. Box 969, Grand Junction, Colo., 81502.

Another interesting booth had two Colorado Division of Wildlife employees offering booklets, along with four-page a brochure for children, and Junior Ranger badges. In front of them was a stuffed bobcat exhibit, one of the many animals found in the fantastic Colorado National Monument, our close neighbor.

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Lee Gagne was teaching Connor Meredith the art of blacksmithing. Lee donates the money he receives from the sale of items made from horseshoes and other iron materials for sale on a table, directly to the FFA members. He also has arranged and supports some junior and senior student musicians purchase music books and a place to practice their music downtown in a room at the Museum of Western Colorado.

In the rear area behind Lee and Connor, a four-row surrey with the fringe on top harnessed to two huge, draft horses, stood parked with its driver patiently waiting for passengers to hire him to be driven around the area in style.

The smell of burning charcoal filled the air late morning air as the sun broke through the clouds overhead. The aroma seduced the willing crowd to line up for the free barbecue lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mary Lou Wilson, Director of the Fruita Chamber of Commerce and her helpers used tongs to lift tasty hamburgers and hot dogs onto fresh buns on the paper plates held out by hungry adults and giggling children.

Two smiling employees of Co-Op Country, Mark Liff and Teresa Davis, offered the diners snack-size bags of potato chips and paper cups to hold the lemonade and iced tea resting at the end of the table.

Near the alpacas down the way, a fenced-in mama goat and her four baby kids attracted the children who wanted to gingerly touch them, while their parents “ooohed and aaahed” in the background, some with their cameras.

And at the end of the field, stood beautiful, regal horses from the Summit School Ranch Equestrian Center, Gateway Canyons. Their owners, A.J. and Amy Valdez, stood proudly next to them, explaining their ranch program. “We know our horses and can fit each person with a horse they will love. We know how precious your children are. We will always give them a horse to fit their capabilities if they want to learn how to ride,” Amy enthused.

They schedule everything from corporate team-building to private events; from birthday parties to pony cart rides. The Summit School Ranch Equestrian Center consists of 500 acres and is located 15 miles north of the Gateway Canyons resort at 28501 Hwy 141, Whitewater, Colo., 81527.

For more information please call (970) 931-2442.

From alpacas, to mama goats and her kids; from elegant horses, to baby chicks and baby rabbits inside the Co-Op Country Store; from the DOW bobcat exhibit to big draft, farm horses, there was more at the third annual Farm and Ranch Days than Old Farmer MacDonald could ever imagine on this sunny Saturday in Fruita, Colo.

At the third annual Farm and Ranch Days in Fruita, Colo., on March 13, Leah Reynolds had one of the many fun and informational booths. Penned up behind her tented booth were four of her alpacas, attracting many onlookers to observe and pet the gentle animals raised by this knowledgeable elementary school teacher. If you missed her this time, she and her alpacas are regulars at the downtown Farmer’s Market every summer. She enjoys sharing her expertise and can answer any alpaca questions you might have. She and her husband, Dan, own Horse Mountain Alpacas.

The Fruita Area Chamber of Commerce, Co-op Country/Ace Hardware, and CSU Extension Service hosted the third annual Farm and Ranch Days. We realize that many small towns across America have their own farm and ranch days to celebrate living in the country.

Even though it wasn’t officially spring, Mid-March is the time to plan gardens, purchase feed or fencing for livestock, find out what’s new in the area, while honoring the old ways of doing things on the farm or in home gardens. What could be more perfect than to meet and chat with neighbors and friends munching free hot dogs and hamburgers, and cups of lemonade or iced tea, while seated on hay bales outdoors in the Colorado sunshine?

As an added bonus, Ernie McHugh, musician and teacher at 8/9 School in Fruita, played country-western tunes on his guitar, entertaining those seated at white tables inside the open tent and those outside perched on the hay bales.

The list of booths goes on and on: Tony Arreola and Wayne Fry, employees of the Grand Valley Drainage District, handed out maps for Division 1, 2 and 3 to those who inquired. The District was started in 1915 and continues today to get rid of ground water seepage. For more information, please call (970) 242-4343 or write P.O. Box 969, Grand Junction, Colo., 81502.

Another interesting booth had two Colorado Division of Wildlife employees offering booklets, along with four-page a brochure for children, and Junior Ranger badges. In front of them was a stuffed bobcat exhibit, one of the many animals found in the fantastic Colorado National Monument, our close neighbor.

Lee Gagne was teaching Connor Meredith the art of blacksmithing. Lee donates the money he receives from the sale of items made from horseshoes and other iron materials for sale on a table, directly to the FFA members. He also has arranged and supports some junior and senior student musicians purchase music books and a place to practice their music downtown in a room at the Museum of Western Colorado.

In the rear area behind Lee and Connor, a four-row surrey with the fringe on top harnessed to two huge, draft horses, stood parked with its driver patiently waiting for passengers to hire him to be driven around the area in style.

The smell of burning charcoal filled the air late morning air as the sun broke through the clouds overhead. The aroma seduced the willing crowd to line up for the free barbecue lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mary Lou Wilson, Director of the Fruita Chamber of Commerce and her helpers used tongs to lift tasty hamburgers and hot dogs onto fresh buns on the paper plates held out by hungry adults and giggling children.

Two smiling employees of Co-Op Country, Mark Liff and Teresa Davis, offered the diners snack-size bags of potato chips and paper cups to hold the lemonade and iced tea resting at the end of the table.

Near the alpacas down the way, a fenced-in mama goat and her four baby kids attracted the children who wanted to gingerly touch them, while their parents “ooohed and aaahed” in the background, some with their cameras.

And at the end of the field, stood beautiful, regal horses from the Summit School Ranch Equestrian Center, Gateway Canyons. Their owners, A.J. and Amy Valdez, stood proudly next to them, explaining their ranch program. “We know our horses and can fit each person with a horse they will love. We know how precious your children are. We will always give them a horse to fit their capabilities if they want to learn how to ride,” Amy enthused.

They schedule everything from corporate team-building to private events; from birthday parties to pony cart rides. The Summit School Ranch Equestrian Center consists of 500 acres and is located 15 miles north of the Gateway Canyons resort at 28501 Hwy 141, Whitewater, Colo., 81527.

For more information please call (970) 931-2442.

From alpacas, to mama goats and her kids; from elegant horses, to baby chicks and baby rabbits inside the Co-Op Country Store; from the DOW bobcat exhibit to big draft, farm horses, there was more at the third annual Farm and Ranch Days than Old Farmer MacDonald could ever imagine on this sunny Saturday in Fruita, Colo.

At the third annual Farm and Ranch Days in Fruita, Colo., on March 13, Leah Reynolds had one of the many fun and informational booths. Penned up behind her tented booth were four of her alpacas, attracting many onlookers to observe and pet the gentle animals raised by this knowledgeable elementary school teacher. If you missed her this time, she and her alpacas are regulars at the downtown Farmer’s Market every summer. She enjoys sharing her expertise and can answer any alpaca questions you might have. She and her husband, Dan, own Horse Mountain Alpacas.

The Fruita Area Chamber of Commerce, Co-op Country/Ace Hardware, and CSU Extension Service hosted the third annual Farm and Ranch Days. We realize that many small towns across America have their own farm and ranch days to celebrate living in the country.

Even though it wasn’t officially spring, Mid-March is the time to plan gardens, purchase feed or fencing for livestock, find out what’s new in the area, while honoring the old ways of doing things on the farm or in home gardens. What could be more perfect than to meet and chat with neighbors and friends munching free hot dogs and hamburgers, and cups of lemonade or iced tea, while seated on hay bales outdoors in the Colorado sunshine?

As an added bonus, Ernie McHugh, musician and teacher at 8/9 School in Fruita, played country-western tunes on his guitar, entertaining those seated at white tables inside the open tent and those outside perched on the hay bales.

The list of booths goes on and on: Tony Arreola and Wayne Fry, employees of the Grand Valley Drainage District, handed out maps for Division 1, 2 and 3 to those who inquired. The District was started in 1915 and continues today to get rid of ground water seepage. For more information, please call (970) 242-4343 or write P.O. Box 969, Grand Junction, Colo., 81502.

Another interesting booth had two Colorado Division of Wildlife employees offering booklets, along with four-page a brochure for children, and Junior Ranger badges. In front of them was a stuffed bobcat exhibit, one of the many animals found in the fantastic Colorado National Monument, our close neighbor.

Lee Gagne was teaching Connor Meredith the art of blacksmithing. Lee donates the money he receives from the sale of items made from horseshoes and other iron materials for sale on a table, directly to the FFA members. He also has arranged and supports some junior and senior student musicians purchase music books and a place to practice their music downtown in a room at the Museum of Western Colorado.

In the rear area behind Lee and Connor, a four-row surrey with the fringe on top harnessed to two huge, draft horses, stood parked with its driver patiently waiting for passengers to hire him to be driven around the area in style.

The smell of burning charcoal filled the air late morning air as the sun broke through the clouds overhead. The aroma seduced the willing crowd to line up for the free barbecue lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mary Lou Wilson, Director of the Fruita Chamber of Commerce and her helpers used tongs to lift tasty hamburgers and hot dogs onto fresh buns on the paper plates held out by hungry adults and giggling children.

Two smiling employees of Co-Op Country, Mark Liff and Teresa Davis, offered the diners snack-size bags of potato chips and paper cups to hold the lemonade and iced tea resting at the end of the table.

Near the alpacas down the way, a fenced-in mama goat and her four baby kids attracted the children who wanted to gingerly touch them, while their parents “ooohed and aaahed” in the background, some with their cameras.

And at the end of the field, stood beautiful, regal horses from the Summit School Ranch Equestrian Center, Gateway Canyons. Their owners, A.J. and Amy Valdez, stood proudly next to them, explaining their ranch program. “We know our horses and can fit each person with a horse they will love. We know how precious your children are. We will always give them a horse to fit their capabilities if they want to learn how to ride,” Amy enthused.

They schedule everything from corporate team-building to private events; from birthday parties to pony cart rides. The Summit School Ranch Equestrian Center consists of 500 acres and is located 15 miles north of the Gateway Canyons resort at 28501 Hwy 141, Whitewater, Colo., 81527.

For more information please call (970) 931-2442.

From alpacas, to mama goats and her kids; from elegant horses, to baby chicks and baby rabbits inside the Co-Op Country Store; from the DOW bobcat exhibit to big draft, farm horses, there was more at the third annual Farm and Ranch Days than Old Farmer MacDonald could ever imagine on this sunny Saturday in Fruita, Colo.

At the third annual Farm and Ranch Days in Fruita, Colo., on March 13, Leah Reynolds had one of the many fun and informational booths. Penned up behind her tented booth were four of her alpacas, attracting many onlookers to observe and pet the gentle animals raised by this knowledgeable elementary school teacher. If you missed her this time, she and her alpacas are regulars at the downtown Farmer’s Market every summer. She enjoys sharing her expertise and can answer any alpaca questions you might have. She and her husband, Dan, own Horse Mountain Alpacas.

The Fruita Area Chamber of Commerce, Co-op Country/Ace Hardware, and CSU Extension Service hosted the third annual Farm and Ranch Days. We realize that many small towns across America have their own farm and ranch days to celebrate living in the country.

Even though it wasn’t officially spring, Mid-March is the time to plan gardens, purchase feed or fencing for livestock, find out what’s new in the area, while honoring the old ways of doing things on the farm or in home gardens. What could be more perfect than to meet and chat with neighbors and friends munching free hot dogs and hamburgers, and cups of lemonade or iced tea, while seated on hay bales outdoors in the Colorado sunshine?

As an added bonus, Ernie McHugh, musician and teacher at 8/9 School in Fruita, played country-western tunes on his guitar, entertaining those seated at white tables inside the open tent and those outside perched on the hay bales.

The list of booths goes on and on: Tony Arreola and Wayne Fry, employees of the Grand Valley Drainage District, handed out maps for Division 1, 2 and 3 to those who inquired. The District was started in 1915 and continues today to get rid of ground water seepage. For more information, please call (970) 242-4343 or write P.O. Box 969, Grand Junction, Colo., 81502.

Another interesting booth had two Colorado Division of Wildlife employees offering booklets, along with four-page a brochure for children, and Junior Ranger badges. In front of them was a stuffed bobcat exhibit, one of the many animals found in the fantastic Colorado National Monument, our close neighbor.

Lee Gagne was teaching Connor Meredith the art of blacksmithing. Lee donates the money he receives from the sale of items made from horseshoes and other iron materials for sale on a table, directly to the FFA members. He also has arranged and supports some junior and senior student musicians purchase music books and a place to practice their music downtown in a room at the Museum of Western Colorado.

In the rear area behind Lee and Connor, a four-row surrey with the fringe on top harnessed to two huge, draft horses, stood parked with its driver patiently waiting for passengers to hire him to be driven around the area in style.

The smell of burning charcoal filled the air late morning air as the sun broke through the clouds overhead. The aroma seduced the willing crowd to line up for the free barbecue lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mary Lou Wilson, Director of the Fruita Chamber of Commerce and her helpers used tongs to lift tasty hamburgers and hot dogs onto fresh buns on the paper plates held out by hungry adults and giggling children.

Two smiling employees of Co-Op Country, Mark Liff and Teresa Davis, offered the diners snack-size bags of potato chips and paper cups to hold the lemonade and iced tea resting at the end of the table.

Near the alpacas down the way, a fenced-in mama goat and her four baby kids attracted the children who wanted to gingerly touch them, while their parents “ooohed and aaahed” in the background, some with their cameras.

And at the end of the field, stood beautiful, regal horses from the Summit School Ranch Equestrian Center, Gateway Canyons. Their owners, A.J. and Amy Valdez, stood proudly next to them, explaining their ranch program. “We know our horses and can fit each person with a horse they will love. We know how precious your children are. We will always give them a horse to fit their capabilities if they want to learn how to ride,” Amy enthused.

They schedule everything from corporate team-building to private events; from birthday parties to pony cart rides. The Summit School Ranch Equestrian Center consists of 500 acres and is located 15 miles north of the Gateway Canyons resort at 28501 Hwy 141, Whitewater, Colo., 81527.

For more information please call (970) 931-2442.

From alpacas, to mama goats and her kids; from elegant horses, to baby chicks and baby rabbits inside the Co-Op Country Store; from the DOW bobcat exhibit to big draft, farm horses, there was more at the third annual Farm and Ranch Days than Old Farmer MacDonald could ever imagine on this sunny Saturday in Fruita, Colo.