Gateway Farm Expo welcomes thousands of visitors | TheFencePost.com

Gateway Farm Expo welcomes thousands of visitors

Robyn Scherer, M.Agr. Staff Reporter

People at the farm show talk to John Deere equipment dealers during the Gateway Farm Expo that was held at the Buffalo County Fairgrounds in Kearney, Neb.

The Gateway Farm Expo, held at the Buffalo County Fairgrounds in Kearney, Neb., brought in thousands of participants over the two day event. The event, coordinated by the Kearney Area Agricultural Producers Alliance (KAAPA), was held on November 16-17.

According to Jeff Burr, President of the Gateway Executive Committee and Financial Officer for Farm Credit Services of America, “A farmer or rancher can make very good use of their time by attending the show. They have the opportunity to visit with numerous vendors and get a first-hand look at new products and services which are being offered to the industry. The same is true for vendors as they will see more prospects and customers in two days than they could in a week of traveling the countryside. Exhibitors also get a chance to network and socialize with other exhibitors. It is really a nice mix of doing business and socializing.”

The Expo offered over 300 exhibitors spread out over 180,000 square feet. On both days of the event, a free lunch was offered to anyone who wanted to attend, and it is estimated that 5,000 lunches were served over the two days. Beef was served on Wednesday, and pork was served on Thursday. The first lunch was sponsored by Platte Valley State Bank and Monsanto, and the second lunch was sponsored by State Bank of Riverdale, Pioneer and NTV.

Speakers were also offered on both days. On the first day, four sessions were held. These included sessions by CropMetrics, GrainBridge, the ARC Group and Dreamland Industries, LTD.

On Thursday, speakers included KAAPA Ethanol, L.L.C., KAAPA, AgWest Commodities and Rayeman Elements, Inc. Mike Thomas, Director of Technology and co-founder of Rayeman Elements, introduced participates to a new line of range cubes that are made from dried distillers grains.

Thomas showed those who went to the seminar the new cube, which is first one of its’ kind produced. “Our cubes don’t have any limiters in them. We use density as a limiter,” he said.

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Entertainment was provided on both days during the luncheon, and on the first day, Alex Whipple, a Nebraska county music artist, treated people to his native country sound.

On the second day, Dave Thorell, radio broadcast personality, talked about life with The Supreme Commander. His comedy skit talked about the different motivators in one’s life through funny stories about parents, teachers, siblings and spouses.

There were several interesting vendors at the expo, including Bio-Ag Industries, L.L.C. The booth, run by Mitch Huebner and Donovan Dirks, introduced expo participants to a different kind of fertilizer.

Instead of a chemical fertilizer, the duo offered compost fertilizer. The fertilizer is made from manure, where it is composted for a minimum of eight weeks, and an internal temperature of 140 degrees Fahrenheit helps to kill bacteria and weed seeds, which then makes the fertilizer safe for use.

This compost fertilizer can help build soil and organic matter for the future. “The compost can be applied before crop planting, and then the liquid ‘tea’ can be applied as many times as you want,” said Heubner.

The “tea” is what is extracted from the fertilizer after it is composted, and a nutrient rich liquid that is safe to apply to crops in all stages of growth. The company is out of Hershey, Neb.

Another booth that brought interesting information was the one run by Ag Navigator, which is a real estate and farm and risk management solution company. George Fond helped people find out about opportunities for new farmers wanting to enter into the agricultural industry.

“We want to help older generations maintain their land while being able to have the younger generations farm it,” Fond said.

He continued, “There are a lot of younger people who want to get into the agricultural industry who can’t afford it. With this program, we can guarantee revenue to the landowner, and help the younger generations get into farming.”

Ag Navigator connects landowners who may not want to farm anymore with other people who are looking for land to farm, but cannot afford to buy the land. The land can then be rented or leased, and is still used for production.

The United States Department of Agriculture had a booth in which they let people know about a rural development program. In this program, farmers and ranchers who make 50 percent or more of their income from farming can receive assistance in the form of energy grants.

According to the USDA, “The REAP Energy Audit and Renewable Energy Development Assistance Grant provides grant assistance to entities that will assist agriculture producers and small rural businesses by conducting energy audits and providing information on renewable energy development assistance.”

Producers may apply for up to $100,000. According to David Willis, the program is pretty popular. “We have had more applicants than funds right now,” he said.

Booths like these help area farmers and ranchers find out about new technologies, and new opportunities in the agricultural industry. The main purpose of the expo is to give exhibitors exposure, and to educate producers.

For Jeff Burr, the best part of the show was “The opportunity to bring so many aspects of agriculture together is at the top of my list. Farmers and ranchers and agribusiness people of every sort have the opportunity to do business and renew old friendships. This year we also added several educational seminars which were a big hit,” he said.

He continued, “We’re very pleased with how the show went. Each year is also a celebration of the volunteer efforts which make the show possible. Because the show is volunteer run, the people involved take a great deal of pride in creating a productive and enjoyable experience for everyone involved. The tradition of hospitality feeds on itself and creates a really positive chemistry for the show. We were also blessed with a timely harvest and nice weather during the show. The show is also the beneficiary of the strong economy that has been created by some of the best times every in production agriculture.”

The Gateway Farm Expo, held at the Buffalo County Fairgrounds in Kearney, Neb., brought in thousands of participants over the two day event. The event, coordinated by the Kearney Area Agricultural Producers Alliance (KAAPA), was held on November 16-17.

According to Jeff Burr, President of the Gateway Executive Committee and Financial Officer for Farm Credit Services of America, “A farmer or rancher can make very good use of their time by attending the show. They have the opportunity to visit with numerous vendors and get a first-hand look at new products and services which are being offered to the industry. The same is true for vendors as they will see more prospects and customers in two days than they could in a week of traveling the countryside. Exhibitors also get a chance to network and socialize with other exhibitors. It is really a nice mix of doing business and socializing.”

The Expo offered over 300 exhibitors spread out over 180,000 square feet. On both days of the event, a free lunch was offered to anyone who wanted to attend, and it is estimated that 5,000 lunches were served over the two days. Beef was served on Wednesday, and pork was served on Thursday. The first lunch was sponsored by Platte Valley State Bank and Monsanto, and the second lunch was sponsored by State Bank of Riverdale, Pioneer and NTV.

Speakers were also offered on both days. On the first day, four sessions were held. These included sessions by CropMetrics, GrainBridge, the ARC Group and Dreamland Industries, LTD.

On Thursday, speakers included KAAPA Ethanol, L.L.C., KAAPA, AgWest Commodities and Rayeman Elements, Inc. Mike Thomas, Director of Technology and co-founder of Rayeman Elements, introduced participates to a new line of range cubes that are made from dried distillers grains.

Thomas showed those who went to the seminar the new cube, which is first one of its’ kind produced. “Our cubes don’t have any limiters in them. We use density as a limiter,” he said.

Entertainment was provided on both days during the luncheon, and on the first day, Alex Whipple, a Nebraska county music artist, treated people to his native country sound.

On the second day, Dave Thorell, radio broadcast personality, talked about life with The Supreme Commander. His comedy skit talked about the different motivators in one’s life through funny stories about parents, teachers, siblings and spouses.

There were several interesting vendors at the expo, including Bio-Ag Industries, L.L.C. The booth, run by Mitch Huebner and Donovan Dirks, introduced expo participants to a different kind of fertilizer.

Instead of a chemical fertilizer, the duo offered compost fertilizer. The fertilizer is made from manure, where it is composted for a minimum of eight weeks, and an internal temperature of 140 degrees Fahrenheit helps to kill bacteria and weed seeds, which then makes the fertilizer safe for use.

This compost fertilizer can help build soil and organic matter for the future. “The compost can be applied before crop planting, and then the liquid ‘tea’ can be applied as many times as you want,” said Heubner.

The “tea” is what is extracted from the fertilizer after it is composted, and a nutrient rich liquid that is safe to apply to crops in all stages of growth. The company is out of Hershey, Neb.

Another booth that brought interesting information was the one run by Ag Navigator, which is a real estate and farm and risk management solution company. George Fond helped people find out about opportunities for new farmers wanting to enter into the agricultural industry.

“We want to help older generations maintain their land while being able to have the younger generations farm it,” Fond said.

He continued, “There are a lot of younger people who want to get into the agricultural industry who can’t afford it. With this program, we can guarantee revenue to the landowner, and help the younger generations get into farming.”

Ag Navigator connects landowners who may not want to farm anymore with other people who are looking for land to farm, but cannot afford to buy the land. The land can then be rented or leased, and is still used for production.

The United States Department of Agriculture had a booth in which they let people know about a rural development program. In this program, farmers and ranchers who make 50 percent or more of their income from farming can receive assistance in the form of energy grants.

According to the USDA, “The REAP Energy Audit and Renewable Energy Development Assistance Grant provides grant assistance to entities that will assist agriculture producers and small rural businesses by conducting energy audits and providing information on renewable energy development assistance.”

Producers may apply for up to $100,000. According to David Willis, the program is pretty popular. “We have had more applicants than funds right now,” he said.

Booths like these help area farmers and ranchers find out about new technologies, and new opportunities in the agricultural industry. The main purpose of the expo is to give exhibitors exposure, and to educate producers.

For Jeff Burr, the best part of the show was “The opportunity to bring so many aspects of agriculture together is at the top of my list. Farmers and ranchers and agribusiness people of every sort have the opportunity to do business and renew old friendships. This year we also added several educational seminars which were a big hit,” he said.

He continued, “We’re very pleased with how the show went. Each year is also a celebration of the volunteer efforts which make the show possible. Because the show is volunteer run, the people involved take a great deal of pride in creating a productive and enjoyable experience for everyone involved. The tradition of hospitality feeds on itself and creates a really positive chemistry for the show. We were also blessed with a timely harvest and nice weather during the show. The show is also the beneficiary of the strong economy that has been created by some of the best times every in production agriculture.”