Gone Hunting 11-15-10 | TheFencePost.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Gone Hunting 11-15-10

Jim Vanek
Greeley, Colo.

What do Roy Rogers, Elvis, Tutankhamun and the Chinese ring-necked pheasant have in common?

If you guessed “King,” you got it. Roy Rogers is known as the “King of the Cowboys.” Elvis, of course, is “The King” and then there is the “Boy King” of Egypt: King Tut.

The ring-necked pheasant is the reigning “king” of upland game birds. On Saturday, Nov. 13, Colorado and Kansas open their hunting seasons for the king.

Pheasant season is Mother Nature’s stimulus program. Just as in Montana, the Dakotas, Nebraska and Iowa before them, Colorado and Kansas will be overrun with hunters making their annual trek to their favorite locations. These hunters are going to pump a lot of money into the economies of eastern Colorado and western Kansas, and both states are boasting pheasant numbers that may be the best we’ve seen in several years.

I’ve been fortunate enough to hunt the opening days in Montana, North Dakota and Nebraska so far in 2010. One word comes to mind as I recall those openers: amazing.

Opening days are why calendars are published – so that you can have a countdown. I call it the “Neil Armstrong Syndrome.” There is nothing like the euphoric feeling hunters get when they are the first to walk a stubble field, fence row or coulee on opening day in search of that season’s naive hatch of pheasants, quail or grouse.

Ninety-nine percent of the land that I hunt on is private land belonging to farmers I know very well.

Most states have public access programs for hunters who are not as fortunate as I am. States publish booklets with maps to these tracts of land, which are generally privately owned, that are open to public hunting.

While in North Dakota I hunted land enrolled in their P.L.O.T.S. program. P.L.O.T.S. is the acronym for “Public Land Open To Sportsmen.”

It was the beginning of the third week of the season, and we took a limit of six roosters and a couple of bonus partridge in less than one hour off of PLOTS near Dickinson.

Nebraska opened its pheasant and quail season Halloween weekend. Again, the only word that comes to mind is amazing.

Practically all crops are out of the fields, and the birds were very accessible. It has been a dry, warm fall and farmers have been able to work in the fields. During the past several years some crops weren’t harvested until December or January.

Some states have made it illegal to hunt game birds in standing crops. Crops that get cut in December or January are actually a bonus to hunters. It is just like having another opening day. That is not going to happen this season.

The only bad luck we’ve had this fall has been trying to fill an antelope tag in Wyoming. Good friend Jeff Cogburn and I wounded several sagebrush and rocks trying to anchor one of those rascals traveling 40 miles per hour 500 yards away.

Recipie for success:

The best thing to come from my travels during the past month is a new recipe for those ring-necks you’re going to come home with after the opener.

My dear friend Marylin Horab from Williston, N.D., sends her recipe for her Knoepfla Soup. It is a combination of potatoes, dumplings and pheasant:

What do Roy Rogers, Elvis, Tutankhamun and the Chinese ring-necked pheasant have in common?

If you guessed “King,” you got it. Roy Rogers is known as the “King of the Cowboys.” Elvis, of course, is “The King” and then there is the “Boy King” of Egypt: King Tut.

The ring-necked pheasant is the reigning “king” of upland game birds. On Saturday, Nov. 13, Colorado and Kansas open their hunting seasons for the king.

Pheasant season is Mother Nature’s stimulus program. Just as in Montana, the Dakotas, Nebraska and Iowa before them, Colorado and Kansas will be overrun with hunters making their annual trek to their favorite locations. These hunters are going to pump a lot of money into the economies of eastern Colorado and western Kansas, and both states are boasting pheasant numbers that may be the best we’ve seen in several years.

I’ve been fortunate enough to hunt the opening days in Montana, North Dakota and Nebraska so far in 2010. One word comes to mind as I recall those openers: amazing.

Opening days are why calendars are published – so that you can have a countdown. I call it the “Neil Armstrong Syndrome.” There is nothing like the euphoric feeling hunters get when they are the first to walk a stubble field, fence row or coulee on opening day in search of that season’s naive hatch of pheasants, quail or grouse.

Ninety-nine percent of the land that I hunt on is private land belonging to farmers I know very well.

Most states have public access programs for hunters who are not as fortunate as I am. States publish booklets with maps to these tracts of land, which are generally privately owned, that are open to public hunting.

While in North Dakota I hunted land enrolled in their P.L.O.T.S. program. P.L.O.T.S. is the acronym for “Public Land Open To Sportsmen.”

It was the beginning of the third week of the season, and we took a limit of six roosters and a couple of bonus partridge in less than one hour off of PLOTS near Dickinson.

Nebraska opened its pheasant and quail season Halloween weekend. Again, the only word that comes to mind is amazing.

Practically all crops are out of the fields, and the birds were very accessible. It has been a dry, warm fall and farmers have been able to work in the fields. During the past several years some crops weren’t harvested until December or January.

Some states have made it illegal to hunt game birds in standing crops. Crops that get cut in December or January are actually a bonus to hunters. It is just like having another opening day. That is not going to happen this season.

The only bad luck we’ve had this fall has been trying to fill an antelope tag in Wyoming. Good friend Jeff Cogburn and I wounded several sagebrush and rocks trying to anchor one of those rascals traveling 40 miles per hour 500 yards away.

Recipie for success:

The best thing to come from my travels during the past month is a new recipe for those ring-necks you’re going to come home with after the opener.

My dear friend Marylin Horab from Williston, N.D., sends her recipe for her Knoepfla Soup. It is a combination of potatoes, dumplings and pheasant:


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User