Great Rodeo and History at the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo | TheFencePost.com

Great Rodeo and History at the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo

Cade Burns is keeping the family rodeo tradition alive. His father, Hal Burns, and grandfather, Pete Burns have both had careers in rodeo. Cade has his PRCA card as a bull fighter and worked the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo.

This area is fortunate to have some of the biggest and best rodeos in the country, but there is something to be said for the charm of a small town rodeo and we also have one of the best small rodeos. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is held in Grover, Colo., and this year celebrates its 87th year of bringing a top flight, professional rodeo to the plains of northeastern Colorado. When you consider that Grover has a population of around 150 and is pretty much out in the middle of nowhere, you begin to get a sense of what an achievement this is.

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo calls itself the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West” and since 1921 has been putting on a great rodeo. This is real professional rodeo that is sanctioned by the PRCA and draws top cowboys like Josh Peek, a regular contender for the All Around buckle at the National Finals Rodeo.

All those good cowboys need good stock to make a great rodeo, and the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo has that covered with the world famous Burns Rodeo Company of Laramie, Wyo. You can not be around for 87 years without generating a little history and the Burns family has been closely tied to the Grover rodeo for many years. Three generations of the Burns family were at the 2010 edition of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo.

Pete Burns, the patriarch of the Burns family, has done just about everything you can do at a rodeo, from being a contestant, to a timer, to taking 10 horses to the first Finals rodeo, which was held in Dallas, Texas. Pete summed up his career as, “I began rodeo in 1947 and kept after it for 10 years and then Les Gore, Jim R. White, and I started the Summit Rodeo Company and we were in business for about 20 years. About four years after Summit broke up, my son Hal and I started Burns Rodeo Company.”

Summit rodeo was very successful and has put on the Little Britches National Finals Rodeo. Pete Burns, together with Jim Rausch and Hyde Merritt has three times put on the National Finals High School Rodeo, and the National Finals College Rodeo. The same team put on the National Finals Steer Roping off and on for over 17 years.

The Anderson and Burns families have been intertwined at the Grover rodeo for many years. The first rodeo put on in Grover was in 1921 and Earl Anderson took over the rodeo in 1929. Back then there was no arena and the rodeo was held under the town’s water tower. That part has not changed a whole lot today. If you go to the PRCA Business Journal, you will find the address of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is listed as “just south of the water tower.”

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“Earl Anderson was a stock contractor and had been putting on the rodeo in Grover for years.” recalls Pete Burns, “Summit Rodeo bought our bulls from him and he began to retire. In 1958 Summit took over the Grover rodeo. Mike Cervi had it for a while and then Burns Rodeo took over in the late 80s and has been the stock contractor ever since.”

The third and youngest generation is Cade Burns. Cade worked the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo as a bull fighter. He has been a bull fighter for three years and got his PRCA card last year. Having spent his entire life surrounded by some of the rankest bulls in the country accounts, in part, for his being selected to fight at the Mountain States Circuit Finals.

Burns Rodeo is probably best known for their great bucking bull, Mr. T. He was big and mean with a huge set of horns. In addition to being the 1986 PRCA Bull of the Year, he was also voted Bucking Bull of the National Finals in 1986 and 1989. Mr. T was unridden until 1989 when veteran bull rider Marty Stanert rode him for 93 points at Cheyenne Frontier Days.

The DNA of Mr. T is still present in the bucking bulls of Burns Rodeo Company and the reason why the action is always great at the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo. Hal Burns explains, “We will buck a lot of young bulls and horses at Grover. It’s a throw-back rodeo. There are no other rodeos like this any more. We come and try and put on a good show for them – buck some young horses and young bulls and have some fun here in Grover.”

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo, the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West,” is held in Grover on Father’s Day. There are not many rodeos like this around any more and Jack Anderson, son of the late Earl Anderson, promises that the 2011 event will be the best yet. So next Father’s Day weekend, take Dad out to Grover for some of the best small town rodeo and hospitality that Colorado has to offer.

This area is fortunate to have some of the biggest and best rodeos in the country, but there is something to be said for the charm of a small town rodeo and we also have one of the best small rodeos. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is held in Grover, Colo., and this year celebrates its 87th year of bringing a top flight, professional rodeo to the plains of northeastern Colorado. When you consider that Grover has a population of around 150 and is pretty much out in the middle of nowhere, you begin to get a sense of what an achievement this is.

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo calls itself the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West” and since 1921 has been putting on a great rodeo. This is real professional rodeo that is sanctioned by the PRCA and draws top cowboys like Josh Peek, a regular contender for the All Around buckle at the National Finals Rodeo.

All those good cowboys need good stock to make a great rodeo, and the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo has that covered with the world famous Burns Rodeo Company of Laramie, Wyo. You can not be around for 87 years without generating a little history and the Burns family has been closely tied to the Grover rodeo for many years. Three generations of the Burns family were at the 2010 edition of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo.

Pete Burns, the patriarch of the Burns family, has done just about everything you can do at a rodeo, from being a contestant, to a timer, to taking 10 horses to the first Finals rodeo, which was held in Dallas, Texas. Pete summed up his career as, “I began rodeo in 1947 and kept after it for 10 years and then Les Gore, Jim R. White, and I started the Summit Rodeo Company and we were in business for about 20 years. About four years after Summit broke up, my son Hal and I started Burns Rodeo Company.”

Summit rodeo was very successful and has put on the Little Britches National Finals Rodeo. Pete Burns, together with Jim Rausch and Hyde Merritt has three times put on the National Finals High School Rodeo, and the National Finals College Rodeo. The same team put on the National Finals Steer Roping off and on for over 17 years.

The Anderson and Burns families have been intertwined at the Grover rodeo for many years. The first rodeo put on in Grover was in 1921 and Earl Anderson took over the rodeo in 1929. Back then there was no arena and the rodeo was held under the town’s water tower. That part has not changed a whole lot today. If you go to the PRCA Business Journal, you will find the address of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is listed as “just south of the water tower.”

“Earl Anderson was a stock contractor and had been putting on the rodeo in Grover for years.” recalls Pete Burns, “Summit Rodeo bought our bulls from him and he began to retire. In 1958 Summit took over the Grover rodeo. Mike Cervi had it for a while and then Burns Rodeo took over in the late 80s and has been the stock contractor ever since.”

The third and youngest generation is Cade Burns. Cade worked the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo as a bull fighter. He has been a bull fighter for three years and got his PRCA card last year. Having spent his entire life surrounded by some of the rankest bulls in the country accounts, in part, for his being selected to fight at the Mountain States Circuit Finals.

Burns Rodeo is probably best known for their great bucking bull, Mr. T. He was big and mean with a huge set of horns. In addition to being the 1986 PRCA Bull of the Year, he was also voted Bucking Bull of the National Finals in 1986 and 1989. Mr. T was unridden until 1989 when veteran bull rider Marty Stanert rode him for 93 points at Cheyenne Frontier Days.

The DNA of Mr. T is still present in the bucking bulls of Burns Rodeo Company and the reason why the action is always great at the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo. Hal Burns explains, “We will buck a lot of young bulls and horses at Grover. It’s a throw-back rodeo. There are no other rodeos like this any more. We come and try and put on a good show for them – buck some young horses and young bulls and have some fun here in Grover.”

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo, the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West,” is held in Grover on Father’s Day. There are not many rodeos like this around any more and Jack Anderson, son of the late Earl Anderson, promises that the 2011 event will be the best yet. So next Father’s Day weekend, take Dad out to Grover for some of the best small town rodeo and hospitality that Colorado has to offer.

This area is fortunate to have some of the biggest and best rodeos in the country, but there is something to be said for the charm of a small town rodeo and we also have one of the best small rodeos. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is held in Grover, Colo., and this year celebrates its 87th year of bringing a top flight, professional rodeo to the plains of northeastern Colorado. When you consider that Grover has a population of around 150 and is pretty much out in the middle of nowhere, you begin to get a sense of what an achievement this is.

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo calls itself the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West” and since 1921 has been putting on a great rodeo. This is real professional rodeo that is sanctioned by the PRCA and draws top cowboys like Josh Peek, a regular contender for the All Around buckle at the National Finals Rodeo.

All those good cowboys need good stock to make a great rodeo, and the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo has that covered with the world famous Burns Rodeo Company of Laramie, Wyo. You can not be around for 87 years without generating a little history and the Burns family has been closely tied to the Grover rodeo for many years. Three generations of the Burns family were at the 2010 edition of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo.

Pete Burns, the patriarch of the Burns family, has done just about everything you can do at a rodeo, from being a contestant, to a timer, to taking 10 horses to the first Finals rodeo, which was held in Dallas, Texas. Pete summed up his career as, “I began rodeo in 1947 and kept after it for 10 years and then Les Gore, Jim R. White, and I started the Summit Rodeo Company and we were in business for about 20 years. About four years after Summit broke up, my son Hal and I started Burns Rodeo Company.”

Summit rodeo was very successful and has put on the Little Britches National Finals Rodeo. Pete Burns, together with Jim Rausch and Hyde Merritt has three times put on the National Finals High School Rodeo, and the National Finals College Rodeo. The same team put on the National Finals Steer Roping off and on for over 17 years.

The Anderson and Burns families have been intertwined at the Grover rodeo for many years. The first rodeo put on in Grover was in 1921 and Earl Anderson took over the rodeo in 1929. Back then there was no arena and the rodeo was held under the town’s water tower. That part has not changed a whole lot today. If you go to the PRCA Business Journal, you will find the address of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is listed as “just south of the water tower.”

“Earl Anderson was a stock contractor and had been putting on the rodeo in Grover for years.” recalls Pete Burns, “Summit Rodeo bought our bulls from him and he began to retire. In 1958 Summit took over the Grover rodeo. Mike Cervi had it for a while and then Burns Rodeo took over in the late 80s and has been the stock contractor ever since.”

The third and youngest generation is Cade Burns. Cade worked the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo as a bull fighter. He has been a bull fighter for three years and got his PRCA card last year. Having spent his entire life surrounded by some of the rankest bulls in the country accounts, in part, for his being selected to fight at the Mountain States Circuit Finals.

Burns Rodeo is probably best known for their great bucking bull, Mr. T. He was big and mean with a huge set of horns. In addition to being the 1986 PRCA Bull of the Year, he was also voted Bucking Bull of the National Finals in 1986 and 1989. Mr. T was unridden until 1989 when veteran bull rider Marty Stanert rode him for 93 points at Cheyenne Frontier Days.

The DNA of Mr. T is still present in the bucking bulls of Burns Rodeo Company and the reason why the action is always great at the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo. Hal Burns explains, “We will buck a lot of young bulls and horses at Grover. It’s a throw-back rodeo. There are no other rodeos like this any more. We come and try and put on a good show for them – buck some young horses and young bulls and have some fun here in Grover.”

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo, the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West,” is held in Grover on Father’s Day. There are not many rodeos like this around any more and Jack Anderson, son of the late Earl Anderson, promises that the 2011 event will be the best yet. So next Father’s Day weekend, take Dad out to Grover for some of the best small town rodeo and hospitality that Colorado has to offer.

This area is fortunate to have some of the biggest and best rodeos in the country, but there is something to be said for the charm of a small town rodeo and we also have one of the best small rodeos. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is held in Grover, Colo., and this year celebrates its 87th year of bringing a top flight, professional rodeo to the plains of northeastern Colorado. When you consider that Grover has a population of around 150 and is pretty much out in the middle of nowhere, you begin to get a sense of what an achievement this is.

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo calls itself the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West” and since 1921 has been putting on a great rodeo. This is real professional rodeo that is sanctioned by the PRCA and draws top cowboys like Josh Peek, a regular contender for the All Around buckle at the National Finals Rodeo.

All those good cowboys need good stock to make a great rodeo, and the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo has that covered with the world famous Burns Rodeo Company of Laramie, Wyo. You can not be around for 87 years without generating a little history and the Burns family has been closely tied to the Grover rodeo for many years. Three generations of the Burns family were at the 2010 edition of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo.

Pete Burns, the patriarch of the Burns family, has done just about everything you can do at a rodeo, from being a contestant, to a timer, to taking 10 horses to the first Finals rodeo, which was held in Dallas, Texas. Pete summed up his career as, “I began rodeo in 1947 and kept after it for 10 years and then Les Gore, Jim R. White, and I started the Summit Rodeo Company and we were in business for about 20 years. About four years after Summit broke up, my son Hal and I started Burns Rodeo Company.”

Summit rodeo was very successful and has put on the Little Britches National Finals Rodeo. Pete Burns, together with Jim Rausch and Hyde Merritt has three times put on the National Finals High School Rodeo, and the National Finals College Rodeo. The same team put on the National Finals Steer Roping off and on for over 17 years.

The Anderson and Burns families have been intertwined at the Grover rodeo for many years. The first rodeo put on in Grover was in 1921 and Earl Anderson took over the rodeo in 1929. Back then there was no arena and the rodeo was held under the town’s water tower. That part has not changed a whole lot today. If you go to the PRCA Business Journal, you will find the address of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is listed as “just south of the water tower.”

“Earl Anderson was a stock contractor and had been putting on the rodeo in Grover for years.” recalls Pete Burns, “Summit Rodeo bought our bulls from him and he began to retire. In 1958 Summit took over the Grover rodeo. Mike Cervi had it for a while and then Burns Rodeo took over in the late 80s and has been the stock contractor ever since.”

The third and youngest generation is Cade Burns. Cade worked the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo as a bull fighter. He has been a bull fighter for three years and got his PRCA card last year. Having spent his entire life surrounded by some of the rankest bulls in the country accounts, in part, for his being selected to fight at the Mountain States Circuit Finals.

Burns Rodeo is probably best known for their great bucking bull, Mr. T. He was big and mean with a huge set of horns. In addition to being the 1986 PRCA Bull of the Year, he was also voted Bucking Bull of the National Finals in 1986 and 1989. Mr. T was unridden until 1989 when veteran bull rider Marty Stanert rode him for 93 points at Cheyenne Frontier Days.

The DNA of Mr. T is still present in the bucking bulls of Burns Rodeo Company and the reason why the action is always great at the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo. Hal Burns explains, “We will buck a lot of young bulls and horses at Grover. It’s a throw-back rodeo. There are no other rodeos like this any more. We come and try and put on a good show for them – buck some young horses and young bulls and have some fun here in Grover.”

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo, the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West,” is held in Grover on Father’s Day. There are not many rodeos like this around any more and Jack Anderson, son of the late Earl Anderson, promises that the 2011 event will be the best yet. So next Father’s Day weekend, take Dad out to Grover for some of the best small town rodeo and hospitality that Colorado has to offer.

This area is fortunate to have some of the biggest and best rodeos in the country, but there is something to be said for the charm of a small town rodeo and we also have one of the best small rodeos. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is held in Grover, Colo., and this year celebrates its 87th year of bringing a top flight, professional rodeo to the plains of northeastern Colorado. When you consider that Grover has a population of around 150 and is pretty much out in the middle of nowhere, you begin to get a sense of what an achievement this is.

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo calls itself the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West” and since 1921 has been putting on a great rodeo. This is real professional rodeo that is sanctioned by the PRCA and draws top cowboys like Josh Peek, a regular contender for the All Around buckle at the National Finals Rodeo.

All those good cowboys need good stock to make a great rodeo, and the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo has that covered with the world famous Burns Rodeo Company of Laramie, Wyo. You can not be around for 87 years without generating a little history and the Burns family has been closely tied to the Grover rodeo for many years. Three generations of the Burns family were at the 2010 edition of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo.

Pete Burns, the patriarch of the Burns family, has done just about everything you can do at a rodeo, from being a contestant, to a timer, to taking 10 horses to the first Finals rodeo, which was held in Dallas, Texas. Pete summed up his career as, “I began rodeo in 1947 and kept after it for 10 years and then Les Gore, Jim R. White, and I started the Summit Rodeo Company and we were in business for about 20 years. About four years after Summit broke up, my son Hal and I started Burns Rodeo Company.”

Summit rodeo was very successful and has put on the Little Britches National Finals Rodeo. Pete Burns, together with Jim Rausch and Hyde Merritt has three times put on the National Finals High School Rodeo, and the National Finals College Rodeo. The same team put on the National Finals Steer Roping off and on for over 17 years.

The Anderson and Burns families have been intertwined at the Grover rodeo for many years. The first rodeo put on in Grover was in 1921 and Earl Anderson took over the rodeo in 1929. Back then there was no arena and the rodeo was held under the town’s water tower. That part has not changed a whole lot today. If you go to the PRCA Business Journal, you will find the address of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is listed as “just south of the water tower.”

“Earl Anderson was a stock contractor and had been putting on the rodeo in Grover for years.” recalls Pete Burns, “Summit Rodeo bought our bulls from him and he began to retire. In 1958 Summit took over the Grover rodeo. Mike Cervi had it for a while and then Burns Rodeo took over in the late 80s and has been the stock contractor ever since.”

The third and youngest generation is Cade Burns. Cade worked the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo as a bull fighter. He has been a bull fighter for three years and got his PRCA card last year. Having spent his entire life surrounded by some of the rankest bulls in the country accounts, in part, for his being selected to fight at the Mountain States Circuit Finals.

Burns Rodeo is probably best known for their great bucking bull, Mr. T. He was big and mean with a huge set of horns. In addition to being the 1986 PRCA Bull of the Year, he was also voted Bucking Bull of the National Finals in 1986 and 1989. Mr. T was unridden until 1989 when veteran bull rider Marty Stanert rode him for 93 points at Cheyenne Frontier Days.

The DNA of Mr. T is still present in the bucking bulls of Burns Rodeo Company and the reason why the action is always great at the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo. Hal Burns explains, “We will buck a lot of young bulls and horses at Grover. It’s a throw-back rodeo. There are no other rodeos like this any more. We come and try and put on a good show for them – buck some young horses and young bulls and have some fun here in Grover.”

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo, the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West,” is held in Grover on Father’s Day. There are not many rodeos like this around any more and Jack Anderson, son of the late Earl Anderson, promises that the 2011 event will be the best yet. So next Father’s Day weekend, take Dad out to Grover for some of the best small town rodeo and hospitality that Colorado has to offer.

This area is fortunate to have some of the biggest and best rodeos in the country, but there is something to be said for the charm of a small town rodeo and we also have one of the best small rodeos. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is held in Grover, Colo., and this year celebrates its 87th year of bringing a top flight, professional rodeo to the plains of northeastern Colorado. When you consider that Grover has a population of around 150 and is pretty much out in the middle of nowhere, you begin to get a sense of what an achievement this is.

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo calls itself the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West” and since 1921 has been putting on a great rodeo. This is real professional rodeo that is sanctioned by the PRCA and draws top cowboys like Josh Peek, a regular contender for the All Around buckle at the National Finals Rodeo.

All those good cowboys need good stock to make a great rodeo, and the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo has that covered with the world famous Burns Rodeo Company of Laramie, Wyo. You can not be around for 87 years without generating a little history and the Burns family has been closely tied to the Grover rodeo for many years. Three generations of the Burns family were at the 2010 edition of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo.

Pete Burns, the patriarch of the Burns family, has done just about everything you can do at a rodeo, from being a contestant, to a timer, to taking 10 horses to the first Finals rodeo, which was held in Dallas, Texas. Pete summed up his career as, “I began rodeo in 1947 and kept after it for 10 years and then Les Gore, Jim R. White, and I started the Summit Rodeo Company and we were in business for about 20 years. About four years after Summit broke up, my son Hal and I started Burns Rodeo Company.”

Summit rodeo was very successful and has put on the Little Britches National Finals Rodeo. Pete Burns, together with Jim Rausch and Hyde Merritt has three times put on the National Finals High School Rodeo, and the National Finals College Rodeo. The same team put on the National Finals Steer Roping off and on for over 17 years.

The Anderson and Burns families have been intertwined at the Grover rodeo for many years. The first rodeo put on in Grover was in 1921 and Earl Anderson took over the rodeo in 1929. Back then there was no arena and the rodeo was held under the town’s water tower. That part has not changed a whole lot today. If you go to the PRCA Business Journal, you will find the address of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is listed as “just south of the water tower.”

“Earl Anderson was a stock contractor and had been putting on the rodeo in Grover for years.” recalls Pete Burns, “Summit Rodeo bought our bulls from him and he began to retire. In 1958 Summit took over the Grover rodeo. Mike Cervi had it for a while and then Burns Rodeo took over in the late 80s and has been the stock contractor ever since.”

The third and youngest generation is Cade Burns. Cade worked the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo as a bull fighter. He has been a bull fighter for three years and got his PRCA card last year. Having spent his entire life surrounded by some of the rankest bulls in the country accounts, in part, for his being selected to fight at the Mountain States Circuit Finals.

Burns Rodeo is probably best known for their great bucking bull, Mr. T. He was big and mean with a huge set of horns. In addition to being the 1986 PRCA Bull of the Year, he was also voted Bucking Bull of the National Finals in 1986 and 1989. Mr. T was unridden until 1989 when veteran bull rider Marty Stanert rode him for 93 points at Cheyenne Frontier Days.

The DNA of Mr. T is still present in the bucking bulls of Burns Rodeo Company and the reason why the action is always great at the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo. Hal Burns explains, “We will buck a lot of young bulls and horses at Grover. It’s a throw-back rodeo. There are no other rodeos like this any more. We come and try and put on a good show for them – buck some young horses and young bulls and have some fun here in Grover.”

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo, the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West,” is held in Grover on Father’s Day. There are not many rodeos like this around any more and Jack Anderson, son of the late Earl Anderson, promises that the 2011 event will be the best yet. So next Father’s Day weekend, take Dad out to Grover for some of the best small town rodeo and hospitality that Colorado has to offer.

This area is fortunate to have some of the biggest and best rodeos in the country, but there is something to be said for the charm of a small town rodeo and we also have one of the best small rodeos. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is held in Grover, Colo., and this year celebrates its 87th year of bringing a top flight, professional rodeo to the plains of northeastern Colorado. When you consider that Grover has a population of around 150 and is pretty much out in the middle of nowhere, you begin to get a sense of what an achievement this is.

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo calls itself the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West” and since 1921 has been putting on a great rodeo. This is real professional rodeo that is sanctioned by the PRCA and draws top cowboys like Josh Peek, a regular contender for the All Around buckle at the National Finals Rodeo.

All those good cowboys need good stock to make a great rodeo, and the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo has that covered with the world famous Burns Rodeo Company of Laramie, Wyo. You can not be around for 87 years without generating a little history and the Burns family has been closely tied to the Grover rodeo for many years. Three generations of the Burns family were at the 2010 edition of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo.

Pete Burns, the patriarch of the Burns family, has done just about everything you can do at a rodeo, from being a contestant, to a timer, to taking 10 horses to the first Finals rodeo, which was held in Dallas, Texas. Pete summed up his career as, “I began rodeo in 1947 and kept after it for 10 years and then Les Gore, Jim R. White, and I started the Summit Rodeo Company and we were in business for about 20 years. About four years after Summit broke up, my son Hal and I started Burns Rodeo Company.”

Summit rodeo was very successful and has put on the Little Britches National Finals Rodeo. Pete Burns, together with Jim Rausch and Hyde Merritt has three times put on the National Finals High School Rodeo, and the National Finals College Rodeo. The same team put on the National Finals Steer Roping off and on for over 17 years.

The Anderson and Burns families have been intertwined at the Grover rodeo for many years. The first rodeo put on in Grover was in 1921 and Earl Anderson took over the rodeo in 1929. Back then there was no arena and the rodeo was held under the town’s water tower. That part has not changed a whole lot today. If you go to the PRCA Business Journal, you will find the address of the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo is listed as “just south of the water tower.”

“Earl Anderson was a stock contractor and had been putting on the rodeo in Grover for years.” recalls Pete Burns, “Summit Rodeo bought our bulls from him and he began to retire. In 1958 Summit took over the Grover rodeo. Mike Cervi had it for a while and then Burns Rodeo took over in the late 80s and has been the stock contractor ever since.”

The third and youngest generation is Cade Burns. Cade worked the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo as a bull fighter. He has been a bull fighter for three years and got his PRCA card last year. Having spent his entire life surrounded by some of the rankest bulls in the country accounts, in part, for his being selected to fight at the Mountain States Circuit Finals.

Burns Rodeo is probably best known for their great bucking bull, Mr. T. He was big and mean with a huge set of horns. In addition to being the 1986 PRCA Bull of the Year, he was also voted Bucking Bull of the National Finals in 1986 and 1989. Mr. T was unridden until 1989 when veteran bull rider Marty Stanert rode him for 93 points at Cheyenne Frontier Days.

The DNA of Mr. T is still present in the bucking bulls of Burns Rodeo Company and the reason why the action is always great at the Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo. Hal Burns explains, “We will buck a lot of young bulls and horses at Grover. It’s a throw-back rodeo. There are no other rodeos like this any more. We come and try and put on a good show for them – buck some young horses and young bulls and have some fun here in Grover.”

The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo, the “Biggest Little Rodeo in the West,” is held in Grover on Father’s Day. There are not many rodeos like this around any more and Jack Anderson, son of the late Earl Anderson, promises that the 2011 event will be the best yet. So next Father’s Day weekend, take Dad out to Grover for some of the best small town rodeo and hospitality that Colorado has to offer.