Gregory’s Radio-Controlled Deere | TheFencePost.com

Gregory’s Radio-Controlled Deere

Fred Hendricks
Bucyrus, Ohio

Photo By Fred HendricksGene Gregory is shown with his scratch-built and radio-controlled 1/4 scale John Deere Model 8020 diesel.

Engineers evolve in different ways. Some are formally educated. Some develop their skills through applied experience. And still others hone their craft by tinkering. The tinker aptly describes Gene Gregory. Gene was employed most of his working career in the potter industry. Although he did not grow up on a farm, he became an admirer of farm tractors and equipment. This admiration progressed into owning and restoring about a dozen vintage tractors. Then he contemplated building his own tractors, the scaled down versions. “I have never been an engineer, but I like the challenge of planning and building. I tell people I just tinker. It’s gratifying to see a project completed to my satisfaction,” Gene commented.

Gene and Doris Gregory reside in the fertile rolling farmland of northeast Ohio. The area was once the hunting grounds of the Delaware Indians. There were several Delaware villages located nearby in the Mohican valley. Settlement of non-Indians began at the turn of the 19th century. Indians were eventually driven from the area during the War of 1812. John Chapman, immortalized as Johnny Appleseed, frequented the region during the 1800s as he cared for his apple tree nurseries. And now, farming thrives throughout much of the rural areas.

Engineers evolve in different ways. Some are formally educated. Some develop their skills through applied experience. And still others hone their craft by tinkering. The tinker aptly describes Gene Gregory. Gene was employed most of his working career in the potter industry. Although he did not grow up on a farm, he became an admirer of farm tractors and equipment. This admiration progressed into owning and restoring about a dozen vintage tractors. Then he contemplated building his own tractors, the scaled down versions. “I have never been an engineer, but I like the challenge of planning and building. I tell people I just tinker. It’s gratifying to see a project completed to my satisfaction,” Gene commented.

Gene and Doris Gregory reside in the fertile rolling farmland of northeast Ohio. The area was once the hunting grounds of the Delaware Indians. There were several Delaware villages located nearby in the Mohican valley. Settlement of non-Indians began at the turn of the 19th century. Indians were eventually driven from the area during the War of 1812. John Chapman, immortalized as Johnny Appleseed, frequented the region during the 1800s as he cared for his apple tree nurseries. And now, farming thrives throughout much of the rural areas.

Engineers evolve in different ways. Some are formally educated. Some develop their skills through applied experience. And still others hone their craft by tinkering. The tinker aptly describes Gene Gregory. Gene was employed most of his working career in the potter industry. Although he did not grow up on a farm, he became an admirer of farm tractors and equipment. This admiration progressed into owning and restoring about a dozen vintage tractors. Then he contemplated building his own tractors, the scaled down versions. “I have never been an engineer, but I like the challenge of planning and building. I tell people I just tinker. It’s gratifying to see a project completed to my satisfaction,” Gene commented.

Gene and Doris Gregory reside in the fertile rolling farmland of northeast Ohio. The area was once the hunting grounds of the Delaware Indians. There were several Delaware villages located nearby in the Mohican valley. Settlement of non-Indians began at the turn of the 19th century. Indians were eventually driven from the area during the War of 1812. John Chapman, immortalized as Johnny Appleseed, frequented the region during the 1800s as he cared for his apple tree nurseries. And now, farming thrives throughout much of the rural areas.

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Engineers evolve in different ways. Some are formally educated. Some develop their skills through applied experience. And still others hone their craft by tinkering. The tinker aptly describes Gene Gregory. Gene was employed most of his working career in the potter industry. Although he did not grow up on a farm, he became an admirer of farm tractors and equipment. This admiration progressed into owning and restoring about a dozen vintage tractors. Then he contemplated building his own tractors, the scaled down versions. “I have never been an engineer, but I like the challenge of planning and building. I tell people I just tinker. It’s gratifying to see a project completed to my satisfaction,” Gene commented.

Gene and Doris Gregory reside in the fertile rolling farmland of northeast Ohio. The area was once the hunting grounds of the Delaware Indians. There were several Delaware villages located nearby in the Mohican valley. Settlement of non-Indians began at the turn of the 19th century. Indians were eventually driven from the area during the War of 1812. John Chapman, immortalized as Johnny Appleseed, frequented the region during the 1800s as he cared for his apple tree nurseries. And now, farming thrives throughout much of the rural areas.