Ham: A meat for all seasons | TheFencePost.com

Ham: A meat for all seasons

Anna Aughenbaugh
Fort Collins, Colo.

Closeup of delicious whole baked sliced ham with fresh strawberries and figs on holiday table.

Ham is enjoyed by most everyone. It is easy to prepare and goes well with all kinds of vegetables and other side dishes. It lends itself to a family feast with scalloped potatoes, Brussels sprouts and tossed salad and then the leftovers can be turned into bean soup, casseroles and sandwiches.

Most hams sold now contain water and are fully cooked. Whole hams weigh 15 to 18 pounds. Butt or shank hams weight 7 to 10 pounds.

Butt end ones have more meat, but are harder to carve than the shank end. Bone-in hams have a better flavor and the added bonus of having the bone for other recipes. A whole ham provides 24 to 28 slices; a half ham provides 10 to 16 servings.

The best hams contain no added water. Ham labeled with natural juices contains water, but when cooked, it sheds the added water. Most hams in the grocery stores have water added. Spiral cut ham has thin slices that are cut around the bone. These are prone to dry out when reheated in the oven. Picnic ham is boneless and falls apart when sliced, so is best for family meals or used in casseroles and soups. Boneless hams are the least expensive, and contain as much water as the manufacturer wants to pump into it, which may be more than 30 percent. These often have a spongy, unappealing texture. Deli ham is formed into an oval shape that is easy to slice for sandwiches. It is best served cold because when heated, it can be rubbery. Boiled ham is boneless, cured, but unsmoked and cooked in water. This is good for sandwiches.

Southern country-style hams are cured, using only salt. They require soaking before cooking. Hams that are sold in most grocery stores are soaked in brine, and then quickly smoked in a few hours in a cloud of liquid smoke. The temperature and humidity in the smoke houses are controlled; once the meat is smoked, the houses become giant ovens that turn it into a mild, smoke flavored, fully cooked ham.

Baking ham in the oven improves its texture and warms it all the way through. Before baking, cut a half inch deep slices in a crisscross diamond pattern on the top of the ham. Using a glaze adds flavor; brush it over ham when the internal temperature reaches 130 degrees F. Brush with remaining glaze every 15 minutes. When ham is done, place on a carving board and tent with foil. Let stand 20 minutes before slicing.

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Ham is enjoyed by most everyone. It is easy to prepare and goes well with all kinds of vegetables and other side dishes. It lends itself to a family feast with scalloped potatoes, Brussels sprouts and tossed salad and then the leftovers can be turned into bean soup, casseroles and sandwiches.

Most hams sold now contain water and are fully cooked. Whole hams weigh 15 to 18 pounds. Butt or shank hams weight 7 to 10 pounds.

Butt end ones have more meat, but are harder to carve than the shank end. Bone-in hams have a better flavor and the added bonus of having the bone for other recipes. A whole ham provides 24 to 28 slices; a half ham provides 10 to 16 servings.

The best hams contain no added water. Ham labeled with natural juices contains water, but when cooked, it sheds the added water. Most hams in the grocery stores have water added. Spiral cut ham has thin slices that are cut around the bone. These are prone to dry out when reheated in the oven. Picnic ham is boneless and falls apart when sliced, so is best for family meals or used in casseroles and soups. Boneless hams are the least expensive, and contain as much water as the manufacturer wants to pump into it, which may be more than 30 percent. These often have a spongy, unappealing texture. Deli ham is formed into an oval shape that is easy to slice for sandwiches. It is best served cold because when heated, it can be rubbery. Boiled ham is boneless, cured, but unsmoked and cooked in water. This is good for sandwiches.

Southern country-style hams are cured, using only salt. They require soaking before cooking. Hams that are sold in most grocery stores are soaked in brine, and then quickly smoked in a few hours in a cloud of liquid smoke. The temperature and humidity in the smoke houses are controlled; once the meat is smoked, the houses become giant ovens that turn it into a mild, smoke flavored, fully cooked ham.

Baking ham in the oven improves its texture and warms it all the way through. Before baking, cut a half inch deep slices in a crisscross diamond pattern on the top of the ham. Using a glaze adds flavor; brush it over ham when the internal temperature reaches 130 degrees F. Brush with remaining glaze every 15 minutes. When ham is done, place on a carving board and tent with foil. Let stand 20 minutes before slicing.

Ham is enjoyed by most everyone. It is easy to prepare and goes well with all kinds of vegetables and other side dishes. It lends itself to a family feast with scalloped potatoes, Brussels sprouts and tossed salad and then the leftovers can be turned into bean soup, casseroles and sandwiches.

Most hams sold now contain water and are fully cooked. Whole hams weigh 15 to 18 pounds. Butt or shank hams weight 7 to 10 pounds.

Butt end ones have more meat, but are harder to carve than the shank end. Bone-in hams have a better flavor and the added bonus of having the bone for other recipes. A whole ham provides 24 to 28 slices; a half ham provides 10 to 16 servings.

The best hams contain no added water. Ham labeled with natural juices contains water, but when cooked, it sheds the added water. Most hams in the grocery stores have water added. Spiral cut ham has thin slices that are cut around the bone. These are prone to dry out when reheated in the oven. Picnic ham is boneless and falls apart when sliced, so is best for family meals or used in casseroles and soups. Boneless hams are the least expensive, and contain as much water as the manufacturer wants to pump into it, which may be more than 30 percent. These often have a spongy, unappealing texture. Deli ham is formed into an oval shape that is easy to slice for sandwiches. It is best served cold because when heated, it can be rubbery. Boiled ham is boneless, cured, but unsmoked and cooked in water. This is good for sandwiches.

Southern country-style hams are cured, using only salt. They require soaking before cooking. Hams that are sold in most grocery stores are soaked in brine, and then quickly smoked in a few hours in a cloud of liquid smoke. The temperature and humidity in the smoke houses are controlled; once the meat is smoked, the houses become giant ovens that turn it into a mild, smoke flavored, fully cooked ham.

Baking ham in the oven improves its texture and warms it all the way through. Before baking, cut a half inch deep slices in a crisscross diamond pattern on the top of the ham. Using a glaze adds flavor; brush it over ham when the internal temperature reaches 130 degrees F. Brush with remaining glaze every 15 minutes. When ham is done, place on a carving board and tent with foil. Let stand 20 minutes before slicing.

Ham is enjoyed by most everyone. It is easy to prepare and goes well with all kinds of vegetables and other side dishes. It lends itself to a family feast with scalloped potatoes, Brussels sprouts and tossed salad and then the leftovers can be turned into bean soup, casseroles and sandwiches.

Most hams sold now contain water and are fully cooked. Whole hams weigh 15 to 18 pounds. Butt or shank hams weight 7 to 10 pounds.

Butt end ones have more meat, but are harder to carve than the shank end. Bone-in hams have a better flavor and the added bonus of having the bone for other recipes. A whole ham provides 24 to 28 slices; a half ham provides 10 to 16 servings.

The best hams contain no added water. Ham labeled with natural juices contains water, but when cooked, it sheds the added water. Most hams in the grocery stores have water added. Spiral cut ham has thin slices that are cut around the bone. These are prone to dry out when reheated in the oven. Picnic ham is boneless and falls apart when sliced, so is best for family meals or used in casseroles and soups. Boneless hams are the least expensive, and contain as much water as the manufacturer wants to pump into it, which may be more than 30 percent. These often have a spongy, unappealing texture. Deli ham is formed into an oval shape that is easy to slice for sandwiches. It is best served cold because when heated, it can be rubbery. Boiled ham is boneless, cured, but unsmoked and cooked in water. This is good for sandwiches.

Southern country-style hams are cured, using only salt. They require soaking before cooking. Hams that are sold in most grocery stores are soaked in brine, and then quickly smoked in a few hours in a cloud of liquid smoke. The temperature and humidity in the smoke houses are controlled; once the meat is smoked, the houses become giant ovens that turn it into a mild, smoke flavored, fully cooked ham.

Baking ham in the oven improves its texture and warms it all the way through. Before baking, cut a half inch deep slices in a crisscross diamond pattern on the top of the ham. Using a glaze adds flavor; brush it over ham when the internal temperature reaches 130 degrees F. Brush with remaining glaze every 15 minutes. When ham is done, place on a carving board and tent with foil. Let stand 20 minutes before slicing.

Ham is enjoyed by most everyone. It is easy to prepare and goes well with all kinds of vegetables and other side dishes. It lends itself to a family feast with scalloped potatoes, Brussels sprouts and tossed salad and then the leftovers can be turned into bean soup, casseroles and sandwiches.

Most hams sold now contain water and are fully cooked. Whole hams weigh 15 to 18 pounds. Butt or shank hams weight 7 to 10 pounds.

Butt end ones have more meat, but are harder to carve than the shank end. Bone-in hams have a better flavor and the added bonus of having the bone for other recipes. A whole ham provides 24 to 28 slices; a half ham provides 10 to 16 servings.

The best hams contain no added water. Ham labeled with natural juices contains water, but when cooked, it sheds the added water. Most hams in the grocery stores have water added. Spiral cut ham has thin slices that are cut around the bone. These are prone to dry out when reheated in the oven. Picnic ham is boneless and falls apart when sliced, so is best for family meals or used in casseroles and soups. Boneless hams are the least expensive, and contain as much water as the manufacturer wants to pump into it, which may be more than 30 percent. These often have a spongy, unappealing texture. Deli ham is formed into an oval shape that is easy to slice for sandwiches. It is best served cold because when heated, it can be rubbery. Boiled ham is boneless, cured, but unsmoked and cooked in water. This is good for sandwiches.

Southern country-style hams are cured, using only salt. They require soaking before cooking. Hams that are sold in most grocery stores are soaked in brine, and then quickly smoked in a few hours in a cloud of liquid smoke. The temperature and humidity in the smoke houses are controlled; once the meat is smoked, the houses become giant ovens that turn it into a mild, smoke flavored, fully cooked ham.

Baking ham in the oven improves its texture and warms it all the way through. Before baking, cut a half inch deep slices in a crisscross diamond pattern on the top of the ham. Using a glaze adds flavor; brush it over ham when the internal temperature reaches 130 degrees F. Brush with remaining glaze every 15 minutes. When ham is done, place on a carving board and tent with foil. Let stand 20 minutes before slicing.

Ham is enjoyed by most everyone. It is easy to prepare and goes well with all kinds of vegetables and other side dishes. It lends itself to a family feast with scalloped potatoes, Brussels sprouts and tossed salad and then the leftovers can be turned into bean soup, casseroles and sandwiches.

Most hams sold now contain water and are fully cooked. Whole hams weigh 15 to 18 pounds. Butt or shank hams weight 7 to 10 pounds.

Butt end ones have more meat, but are harder to carve than the shank end. Bone-in hams have a better flavor and the added bonus of having the bone for other recipes. A whole ham provides 24 to 28 slices; a half ham provides 10 to 16 servings.

The best hams contain no added water. Ham labeled with natural juices contains water, but when cooked, it sheds the added water. Most hams in the grocery stores have water added. Spiral cut ham has thin slices that are cut around the bone. These are prone to dry out when reheated in the oven. Picnic ham is boneless and falls apart when sliced, so is best for family meals or used in casseroles and soups. Boneless hams are the least expensive, and contain as much water as the manufacturer wants to pump into it, which may be more than 30 percent. These often have a spongy, unappealing texture. Deli ham is formed into an oval shape that is easy to slice for sandwiches. It is best served cold because when heated, it can be rubbery. Boiled ham is boneless, cured, but unsmoked and cooked in water. This is good for sandwiches.

Southern country-style hams are cured, using only salt. They require soaking before cooking. Hams that are sold in most grocery stores are soaked in brine, and then quickly smoked in a few hours in a cloud of liquid smoke. The temperature and humidity in the smoke houses are controlled; once the meat is smoked, the houses become giant ovens that turn it into a mild, smoke flavored, fully cooked ham.

Baking ham in the oven improves its texture and warms it all the way through. Before baking, cut a half inch deep slices in a crisscross diamond pattern on the top of the ham. Using a glaze adds flavor; brush it over ham when the internal temperature reaches 130 degrees F. Brush with remaining glaze every 15 minutes. When ham is done, place on a carving board and tent with foil. Let stand 20 minutes before slicing.

Ham is enjoyed by most everyone. It is easy to prepare and goes well with all kinds of vegetables and other side dishes. It lends itself to a family feast with scalloped potatoes, Brussels sprouts and tossed salad and then the leftovers can be turned into bean soup, casseroles and sandwiches.

Most hams sold now contain water and are fully cooked. Whole hams weigh 15 to 18 pounds. Butt or shank hams weight 7 to 10 pounds.

Butt end ones have more meat, but are harder to carve than the shank end. Bone-in hams have a better flavor and the added bonus of having the bone for other recipes. A whole ham provides 24 to 28 slices; a half ham provides 10 to 16 servings.

The best hams contain no added water. Ham labeled with natural juices contains water, but when cooked, it sheds the added water. Most hams in the grocery stores have water added. Spiral cut ham has thin slices that are cut around the bone. These are prone to dry out when reheated in the oven. Picnic ham is boneless and falls apart when sliced, so is best for family meals or used in casseroles and soups. Boneless hams are the least expensive, and contain as much water as the manufacturer wants to pump into it, which may be more than 30 percent. These often have a spongy, unappealing texture. Deli ham is formed into an oval shape that is easy to slice for sandwiches. It is best served cold because when heated, it can be rubbery. Boiled ham is boneless, cured, but unsmoked and cooked in water. This is good for sandwiches.

Southern country-style hams are cured, using only salt. They require soaking before cooking. Hams that are sold in most grocery stores are soaked in brine, and then quickly smoked in a few hours in a cloud of liquid smoke. The temperature and humidity in the smoke houses are controlled; once the meat is smoked, the houses become giant ovens that turn it into a mild, smoke flavored, fully cooked ham.

Baking ham in the oven improves its texture and warms it all the way through. Before baking, cut a half inch deep slices in a crisscross diamond pattern on the top of the ham. Using a glaze adds flavor; brush it over ham when the internal temperature reaches 130 degrees F. Brush with remaining glaze every 15 minutes. When ham is done, place on a carving board and tent with foil. Let stand 20 minutes before slicing.