Historic Crutch Ranch wins top spot at 2011 Ride for the Brand Ranch Rodeo | TheFencePost.com

Historic Crutch Ranch wins top spot at 2011 Ride for the Brand Ranch Rodeo

Tony Bruguiere Ft. Collins, Colo.

Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November.

These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day.

There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team.

The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these.

The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading.

Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal.

Recommended Stories For You

Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them.

You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time.

Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it.

Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.”

One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain.

Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November.

These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day.

There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team.

The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these.

The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading.

Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal.

Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them.

You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time.

Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it.

Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.”

One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain.

Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November.

These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day.

There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team.

The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these.

The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading.

Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal.

Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them.

You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time.

Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it.

Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.”

One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain.

Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November.

These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day.

There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team.

The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these.

The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading.

Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal.

Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them.

You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time.

Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it.

Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.”

One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain.

Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November.

These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day.

There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team.

The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these.

The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading.

Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal.

Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them.

You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time.

Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it.

Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.”

One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain.

Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November.

These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day.

There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team.

The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these.

The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading.

Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal.

Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them.

You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time.

Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it.

Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.”

One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee.

The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain.