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Horsin’ Around

by Roger Thompson
Fort Collins, Colo.

This story is not about horses ” it’s about kids, and what better substitute? A while back, I got a letter from a school bus driver who that I not use a name. This is a shame when we have so many, amazingly good young people and school bus drivers in our area. Oh, I have to admit there are some who do not fall into that category, but for the most part, they are great and I am proud of them. Here is the letter sent to me:

To Whom It May Concern:

All you hear about these days is how bad kids are. The mistakes of our younger generation seem to take the forefront in the news and media. We are constantly hearing how our youth are up to no good. I would like to bring to your attention some kids that are breaking this mold and excelling at helping others.

I drive a school bus in northern Fort Collins area transporting your normal everyday high school kids, or so I thought. My entire opinion changed last spring. On April 12, 2007, I challenged the kids on my bus to take to the streets of Wellington and help raise money for ‘K99’s 28 Hours of Hope’.

The ’28 Hours of Hope’ is a fundraiser on the local radio station put on every year at tax time. The DJs stay on the air for 28 hours straight to help raise money for several organizations: A Child’s Place in Greeley, The Namaqua Center in Loveland, The Child Advocacy Center in Loveland and The Child Advocacy Center in Fort Collins.”

“After school, 16 kids and I lined each side of Main Street in Wellington with posters and coffee cans. My goal was about $300 and I made an agreement that for every $50 raised, I would wear a blue Mohawk for one school day. Crazy, yes, but for a good cause. Although it was really cold and snowing that evening and we had to share a couple pairs of gloves between us, the kids stayed out on the streets asking for donations for three-and-a-half hours. We had a blast and when it was all said and done, 16 kids with frozen fingers but amazingly warm hearts raised $1,100 ” $100 of which came from loose change people had in their cars.

This story is not about horses ” it’s about kids, and what better substitute? A while back, I got a letter from a school bus driver who that I not use a name. This is a shame when we have so many, amazingly good young people and school bus drivers in our area. Oh, I have to admit there are some who do not fall into that category, but for the most part, they are great and I am proud of them. Here is the letter sent to me:

To Whom It May Concern:

All you hear about these days is how bad kids are. The mistakes of our younger generation seem to take the forefront in the news and media. We are constantly hearing how our youth are up to no good. I would like to bring to your attention some kids that are breaking this mold and excelling at helping others.

I drive a school bus in northern Fort Collins area transporting your normal everyday high school kids, or so I thought. My entire opinion changed last spring. On April 12, 2007, I challenged the kids on my bus to take to the streets of Wellington and help raise money for ‘K99’s 28 Hours of Hope’.

The ’28 Hours of Hope’ is a fundraiser on the local radio station put on every year at tax time. The DJs stay on the air for 28 hours straight to help raise money for several organizations: A Child’s Place in Greeley, The Namaqua Center in Loveland, The Child Advocacy Center in Loveland and The Child Advocacy Center in Fort Collins.”

“After school, 16 kids and I lined each side of Main Street in Wellington with posters and coffee cans. My goal was about $300 and I made an agreement that for every $50 raised, I would wear a blue Mohawk for one school day. Crazy, yes, but for a good cause. Although it was really cold and snowing that evening and we had to share a couple pairs of gloves between us, the kids stayed out on the streets asking for donations for three-and-a-half hours. We had a blast and when it was all said and done, 16 kids with frozen fingers but amazingly warm hearts raised $1,100 ” $100 of which came from loose change people had in their cars.

This story is not about horses ” it’s about kids, and what better substitute? A while back, I got a letter from a school bus driver who that I not use a name. This is a shame when we have so many, amazingly good young people and school bus drivers in our area. Oh, I have to admit there are some who do not fall into that category, but for the most part, they are great and I am proud of them. Here is the letter sent to me:

To Whom It May Concern:

All you hear about these days is how bad kids are. The mistakes of our younger generation seem to take the forefront in the news and media. We are constantly hearing how our youth are up to no good. I would like to bring to your attention some kids that are breaking this mold and excelling at helping others.

I drive a school bus in northern Fort Collins area transporting your normal everyday high school kids, or so I thought. My entire opinion changed last spring. On April 12, 2007, I challenged the kids on my bus to take to the streets of Wellington and help raise money for ‘K99’s 28 Hours of Hope’.

The ’28 Hours of Hope’ is a fundraiser on the local radio station put on every year at tax time. The DJs stay on the air for 28 hours straight to help raise money for several organizations: A Child’s Place in Greeley, The Namaqua Center in Loveland, The Child Advocacy Center in Loveland and The Child Advocacy Center in Fort Collins.”

“After school, 16 kids and I lined each side of Main Street in Wellington with posters and coffee cans. My goal was about $300 and I made an agreement that for every $50 raised, I would wear a blue Mohawk for one school day. Crazy, yes, but for a good cause. Although it was really cold and snowing that evening and we had to share a couple pairs of gloves between us, the kids stayed out on the streets asking for donations for three-and-a-half hours. We had a blast and when it was all said and done, 16 kids with frozen fingers but amazingly warm hearts raised $1,100 ” $100 of which came from loose change people had in their cars.


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