Independent Cattlemen of Wyoming hold state convention in Casper | TheFencePost.com

Independent Cattlemen of Wyoming hold state convention in Casper

Terry Henderson
ICOW Media Chairman

The Independent Cattlemen of Wyoming held its state convention in Casper, Nov 2-3, 2018. Several outstanding speakers provided a great deal of information and education.

Bill Bullard, CEO from Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund, United Stockgrowers of America listed several facts and presented illustrated charts showing how the governmental rejection of Country of Origin Labeling, which allows the consumer to know where their meat truly comes from, precipitated a severe drop in cattle prices directly after COOL ended. He also used the government's own data to show the drastic decline in the number of ranches today versus when the Beef Checkoff was implemented. Tatum Lee, development director for R-CALF USA also spoke about ranchers working together to counter several industry issues.

Stacy Lynn, an investigative journalist, gave several pointers on how to fight incrementalism. Incrementalism is where an idea is slowly pushed into a culture, to eventually change the attitude of a society, even when that idea may be something totally ridiculous. It is the process of making small changes until the goal is finally reached. The backers ultimately desensitize natural human behavior through subtle control. Most of the time those ideas are pushed by a minority group with an agenda. Lynn said a person must use direct evidence countering the fallacy. For example, climate control has caused increased regulations on all society despite conflicting information regarding climate change. She explained the difference between the RAND approach versus Radical consensus. In essence, the RAND approach is a scientific method used to reduce a range of responses to come to a consensus. The Radical consensus destroys the scientific process and has a total disregard for our country's Constitution (our nation's ultimate law). The Radical group will spew any data to reach their goal, including the lowest form of evidence — their opinion. Some steps to fix the problem are by doing research such as with Google Scholar, watch for idea workshops to track who is 'incrementalizing,' go straight to the contacts, immerse yourself in the subject, ask "What is broken?," and show your elected officials the unconstitutionality of a particular statute. Many issues need to be verified as a truly scientific problem and not just a special interest "want."

Rep. Chuck Gray, R-District 57, outlined what the Wyoming legislature did to fill the fiscal shortfall of $1.1 billion for the 2017 session and looked at some of the short- and long-term proposals for 2018. Other topics discussed included prohibition of sanctuary cities in Wyoming, coal export terminal litigation, the health care transparency act and the Medicaid work requirement. He said such issues as a Taxpayer's Bill of Rights, which could provide that any tax increase would have to be approved by voters, and term limits would need voter's insistence that they want those changes.

Matt and Janet Thompson shared the heart-breaking story of how they had built from scratch (over several years) a 10,000-head cattle feedyard in Western Australia, but were ultimately shut down by unfair political processes and environmental agendas. The events that happened to them are very similar to the political and regulatory processes that are happening to American agriculture. They illustrated one of the big forces in the radical environmental field by showing a video of Jason Gray of the World Wildlife Fund. Gray clearly outlined his plan to undercut agriculture, including the beef industry, through global roundtables. He used the ruse that it was helping consumers have a better life with better food, while in the same video he admitted that he had no compassion for the consumer at all; that they didn't matter. One disconcerting point was the beef check off emblem prominently displayed on the World Wildlife Fund's web page, thus showing how hard-earned rancher dollars are being used against their own industry. ❖