Jeremy Sparks retires from bullfighting | TheFencePost.com

Jeremy Sparks retires from bullfighting

Tony BruguiereJeremy Sparks spent nine years protecting the cowboys at Cheyenne Frontier Days before he retired this year.

Five years ago I wrote an article about Jeremy Sparks, a bullfighter at Cheyenne Frontier Days, this year, at the 114th edition of Cheyenne Frontier Days, Jeremy Sparks retired.

I wrote the original article because Jeremy Sparks was pretty unique as a bullfighter. It is not often that you find a bullfighter that is a Lieutenant on active duty in the U.S. Air Force. Besides his regular duties as a member of the 90th Space Wing at F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, Wyo., he was also sponsored by the Air Force to travel as a bullfighter and do public relations for the Air Force.

Jeremy was well suited for the job. According to the PRCA, “Jeremy Sparks has one of the most impressive lists of academic accomplishments in pro rodeo.” He is a magna cum laude graduate from the University of Arkansas-Monticello with a degree in communications and is a three-time All American Scholar.

His bullfighting resume is equally impressive, and he is best known to area fans as being chosen as a cowboy protector at Cheyenne Frontier Days for nine consecutive years.

Jeremy decided to hang up his cleats and ‘baggies’ after one last performance at CFD, the rodeo that had meant so much to him. “To be honest with you, this last time is like every other time, but I know that when this one is over, I’m turning a page, and for that, I’m pretty excited.” Jeremy said, “But I still get the same excitement out there with the bull riders and the bucking bulls. I’m excited. I wouldn’t lie and tell you that I’m not. It’s a little different because I’m excited to be here and, at the same time, I’m excited that it is going to end.”

Asked why he decided to retire, Sparks said, “With so many people, either the game quits them or they don’t know how to quit the game, because that’s what they have done for so long. For me, it’s great to be able to do this on my own term. I’m young and still healthy and I can leave here and move on to the next stage in my life.”

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So what is the next stage of Jeremy Sparks’ life? “My main focus is just being a ‘dad’ to my kids. I’ve got the twins and a little boy that is five,” said Sparks, “and my primary goal is to provide the resources and the training to let my kids pursue whatever they want to in life.”

Jeremy is still on active duty in the military, although his uniform has changed. He is now a Captain in the Wyoming Army National Guard. He heads the Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program. Sparks and the program function as a support system for the families of National Guard members who are on active duty. When the Guard members return, the program helps to integrate the soldier back into the life they left as a ‘citizen soldier.’

Asked if he had anything that he wanted to say to his fans, Jeremy replied, “The fans are what make this sport so unique. There are not too many cowboys that are getting rich and famous, but the cowboys come back time after time because the fans appreciate what they are doing.”

“Bullfighters are literally putting our life on the line when we go into the arena. Obliviously, we know how to mitigate the risk, but there is definitely a life or death aspect to this sport.” Jeremy said, “So we do it for the fans for a large part. I thank the fans for coming back year after year to watch us entertain them.”

“I just want to thank the fans for all of their support and I want to thank God for keeping me safe and always being there for me.” Jeremy said.

Bullfighting is a dangerous business and Jeremy Sparks is retiring for all the right reasons, but he will be missed by the fans and the cowboys that he has protected at Cheyenne Frontier days.

Five years ago I wrote an article about Jeremy Sparks, a bullfighter at Cheyenne Frontier Days, this year, at the 114th edition of Cheyenne Frontier Days, Jeremy Sparks retired.

I wrote the original article because Jeremy Sparks was pretty unique as a bullfighter. It is not often that you find a bullfighter that is a Lieutenant on active duty in the U.S. Air Force. Besides his regular duties as a member of the 90th Space Wing at F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, Wyo., he was also sponsored by the Air Force to travel as a bullfighter and do public relations for the Air Force.

Jeremy was well suited for the job. According to the PRCA, “Jeremy Sparks has one of the most impressive lists of academic accomplishments in pro rodeo.” He is a magna cum laude graduate from the University of Arkansas-Monticello with a degree in communications and is a three-time All American Scholar.

His bullfighting resume is equally impressive, and he is best known to area fans as being chosen as a cowboy protector at Cheyenne Frontier Days for nine consecutive years.

Jeremy decided to hang up his cleats and ‘baggies’ after one last performance at CFD, the rodeo that had meant so much to him. “To be honest with you, this last time is like every other time, but I know that when this one is over, I’m turning a page, and for that, I’m pretty excited.” Jeremy said, “But I still get the same excitement out there with the bull riders and the bucking bulls. I’m excited. I wouldn’t lie and tell you that I’m not. It’s a little different because I’m excited to be here and, at the same time, I’m excited that it is going to end.”

Asked why he decided to retire, Sparks said, “With so many people, either the game quits them or they don’t know how to quit the game, because that’s what they have done for so long. For me, it’s great to be able to do this on my own term. I’m young and still healthy and I can leave here and move on to the next stage in my life.”

So what is the next stage of Jeremy Sparks’ life? “My main focus is just being a ‘dad’ to my kids. I’ve got the twins and a little boy that is five,” said Sparks, “and my primary goal is to provide the resources and the training to let my kids pursue whatever they want to in life.”

Jeremy is still on active duty in the military, although his uniform has changed. He is now a Captain in the Wyoming Army National Guard. He heads the Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program. Sparks and the program function as a support system for the families of National Guard members who are on active duty. When the Guard members return, the program helps to integrate the soldier back into the life they left as a ‘citizen soldier.’

Asked if he had anything that he wanted to say to his fans, Jeremy replied, “The fans are what make this sport so unique. There are not too many cowboys that are getting rich and famous, but the cowboys come back time after time because the fans appreciate what they are doing.”

“Bullfighters are literally putting our life on the line when we go into the arena. Obliviously, we know how to mitigate the risk, but there is definitely a life or death aspect to this sport.” Jeremy said, “So we do it for the fans for a large part. I thank the fans for coming back year after year to watch us entertain them.”

“I just want to thank the fans for all of their support and I want to thank God for keeping me safe and always being there for me.” Jeremy said.

Bullfighting is a dangerous business and Jeremy Sparks is retiring for all the right reasons, but he will be missed by the fans and the cowboys that he has protected at Cheyenne Frontier days.