Jordan Cattle Co. of Briggsdale, Colo., recognized for excellence in range management | TheFencePost.com

Jordan Cattle Co. of Briggsdale, Colo., recognized for excellence in range management

Ben Berlinger
Colorado Section of the Society for Range Management

(L to R) Colorado Section SRM president Josh Saunders, Emmett Jordan, and Colorado Section member Ben Berlinger present the Excellence in Rangeland Conservation Award at the annual meeting of the Colorado Section SRM in Pueblo on Oct. 31.

The Jordan Cattle Co. of Briggsdale, Colo., was recently given the Excellence in Rangeland Conservation Award by the Colorado Section of the Society for Range Management. The presentation was made at the annual meeting of the Colorado Section held in Pueblo on Oct. 31. The Jordan Cattle Co. was nominated for the Colorado Section SRM Excellence in Rangeland Conservation award for consistently demonstrating exemplary efforts in the stewardship of the rangeland resources under their management. Emmett Jordan was honored to receive the award on behalf of his family; wife Carrie, and sons Wyatt and Walter.

The Jordan Cattle Co. ranch is located about 7 miles east of Briggsdale in northern Colorado's high plains in a shortgrass prairie ecosystem. The average annual precipitation is 11 to 12 inches. The large fluctuations in timing and quantity of rainfall — from month to month and year to year — is a continuous challenge to range management. Currently, as put together by the Jordan family, the ranching unit consists of 10,740 acres.

The ranch is operated as a cow-calf enterprise. A minor enterprise consists of developing and selling register Angus bulls. The ranch strives for the cattle operation to be, as much as possible, a reflection of the natural processes that drive a healthy ecosystem. Managed grazing is the tool used on the ranch to improve soil and plant health; water absorption and retention; and nutrient and energy cycling. "We seek competitive business advantage through our grazing methods. Our sense of stewardship is that wise use is an ongoing process, not an end," Jordan said.

Jordan summarized his rangeland conservation ethic this way. "Our work is an expression of gratitude for the privilege to be on the land. Our strategy is to foster nature's healing and regenerative powers. When we plan grazing and infrastructure, we strategize to balance our goals to improve the range; foster good animal husbandry; earn a profit; and to be enjoyable."