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Kauai Coffee Company

by Ella Marie Hayes
Saratoga, Wyo.
The Kauai Coffee Visitor Center is located on the southwest side of Kauai about 17 miles from Lihue. The Center features information about coffee growing and its history, a video explaining modern coffee production, and offers an opportunity to sample many flavors of coffee.

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When it appears that winter doesn’t want to release its grip on snowy weather in our area, we hibernate, and think of warmer climates we have visited like Hawaii. When we once mentioned that it was 60 degrees in Denver in February, our Hawaii friends asked, “Is that warm or cold?” To us it is warm, but to them it meant “cold”!

During our winter trip to Hawaii we had an opportunity to visit fields and processing plants that replaced the sugar cane plantations that once predominated.

Over 150 years ago the first coffee plantation was established near Koloa on Kauai. Abundant water, fertile volcanic soil and Pacific sun make ideal conditions, but when sugar cane became king the coffee plantations were planted with sugar cane. When the current day sugar markets caused many sugar plantations to close, the search began for alternate crops and industries, the logical move was back to coffee.

As we drove through Kauai’s southwest side, we begin to see acres and acres of coffee fields. The fields, located about 17 miles from Lihue, yield the beans marketed by the Kauai Coffee Company on its 3,400-acre estate, the largest coffee plantation in Hawaii.

Kauai Coffee is a relatively new company, but its fields are near the site of Hawaii’s first commercial coffee plantation, established more than 150 years ago.

When sugar production slowed following World War II, bowing to political and global market pressures, many sugar plantations chose to diversify, and the sugar plantation near Koloa turned to coffee production.

Coffee is also grown on Maui, Molokai, and Hawaii Island where ideal conditions are also found. The coffee tree is somewhat hardy, but not where temperatures dip below 32 degrees for any length of time.

When it appears that winter doesn’t want to release its grip on snowy weather in our area, we hibernate, and think of warmer climates we have visited like Hawaii. When we once mentioned that it was 60 degrees in Denver in February, our Hawaii friends asked, “Is that warm or cold?” To us it is warm, but to them it meant “cold”!

During our winter trip to Hawaii we had an opportunity to visit fields and processing plants that replaced the sugar cane plantations that once predominated.

Over 150 years ago the first coffee plantation was established near Koloa on Kauai. Abundant water, fertile volcanic soil and Pacific sun make ideal conditions, but when sugar cane became king the coffee plantations were planted with sugar cane. When the current day sugar markets caused many sugar plantations to close, the search began for alternate crops and industries, the logical move was back to coffee.

As we drove through Kauai’s southwest side, we begin to see acres and acres of coffee fields. The fields, located about 17 miles from Lihue, yield the beans marketed by the Kauai Coffee Company on its 3,400-acre estate, the largest coffee plantation in Hawaii.

Kauai Coffee is a relatively new company, but its fields are near the site of Hawaii’s first commercial coffee plantation, established more than 150 years ago.

When sugar production slowed following World War II, bowing to political and global market pressures, many sugar plantations chose to diversify, and the sugar plantation near Koloa turned to coffee production.

Coffee is also grown on Maui, Molokai, and Hawaii Island where ideal conditions are also found. The coffee tree is somewhat hardy, but not where temperatures dip below 32 degrees for any length of time.

When it appears that winter doesn’t want to release its grip on snowy weather in our area, we hibernate, and think of warmer climates we have visited like Hawaii. When we once mentioned that it was 60 degrees in Denver in February, our Hawaii friends asked, “Is that warm or cold?” To us it is warm, but to them it meant “cold”!

During our winter trip to Hawaii we had an opportunity to visit fields and processing plants that replaced the sugar cane plantations that once predominated.

Over 150 years ago the first coffee plantation was established near Koloa on Kauai. Abundant water, fertile volcanic soil and Pacific sun make ideal conditions, but when sugar cane became king the coffee plantations were planted with sugar cane. When the current day sugar markets caused many sugar plantations to close, the search began for alternate crops and industries, the logical move was back to coffee.

As we drove through Kauai’s southwest side, we begin to see acres and acres of coffee fields. The fields, located about 17 miles from Lihue, yield the beans marketed by the Kauai Coffee Company on its 3,400-acre estate, the largest coffee plantation in Hawaii.

Kauai Coffee is a relatively new company, but its fields are near the site of Hawaii’s first commercial coffee plantation, established more than 150 years ago.

When sugar production slowed following World War II, bowing to political and global market pressures, many sugar plantations chose to diversify, and the sugar plantation near Koloa turned to coffee production.

Coffee is also grown on Maui, Molokai, and Hawaii Island where ideal conditions are also found. The coffee tree is somewhat hardy, but not where temperatures dip below 32 degrees for any length of time.


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