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Kersey man chosen as top volunteer at Colorado Farm Show

Bill Jackson
Greeley, Colo.

Larry Connell said he was somewhat surprised but appreciative when he was informed he will be honored as the Colorado Farm Show Volunteer of the Year at the 2010 show, which starts Tuesday.

“I appreciate it, I really do. It’s been a good bunch of guys that I’ve worked with,” Connell said.

A member of the buildings and grounds committee since 2003, Connell and his group of 8-10 volunteers are responsible for setting up signs, getting all the electrical and fire extinguishers set up prior to the show, then helping with traffic during and after the show each year.

The annual show is planned and conducted by a group of about 100 volunteers. Exhibitions and programs will be open to the public, at no cost, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday for the 2010 show.

Mark Long of Windsor is in his second and last year as general chairman of the farm show and said he has not seen any real effect as a result of the economy on this year’s show. He said all the spaces for vendors are sold out.

“We lost one big implement dealer from Fort Collins, but sold that space instantly. And we still have a waiting list to get into the show, and I think there’s still about 15 on the list,” Long said.

He said he’s expecting good crowds again this year, which for the past 10 years or so has approached 30,000 visitors for the three-day show.

“Last year, we had to open the overflow parking lot on the first day and that’s the first time that’s happened. We’re hoping for the same again this year,” Long said.

Parking for the show is $5, which is good for one day or all three days. Money raised from parking fees is used to fund scholarships to high school students from around the state. Each year, the farm show awards six of those scholarships named in memory of Chuck Urano, a former horticulturist at the Weld County office of Colorado State University and one of the five founders of what was to become the farm show in 1967 in downtown Greeley.

The show is now conducted from facilities at Greeley’s Island Grove Regional Park, including the Events Center, Exhibition and 4-H buildings, and the livestock pavilion.

Connell, who farms south of Kersey and has his own trucking business hauling his own grain and hay, as well as corn stalks following each year’s harvest, will take some time out this week to be at the show. The corn stalks, he added, are used by dairies and feedlots in the area.

“Usually, I’ve had 100 or so loads of corn stalks by this time of the year, but so far I’ve only done 10 or 12. It’s just been one of those years trying to get the corn harvested and getting the stalks out of the fields,” Connell said.

The theme for this year’s show is Saluting American Agriculture.

Credit dynamics and volatility of agricultural lending will lead off this year’s show at 10 a.m. Tuesday. Dennis Blick, a senior vice president and regional manager for CoBank of Wichita, Kan., will give a brief overview of the “housing bubble” and how the ensuing credit crisis has hit all aspects of bank/borrower relationships. He will discuss the current bank regulatory environment and its impact on lending practices, including how traditional credit risks and “new” risks have evolved.

Blick will also review some of the factors that influence the perspectives of bankers lending to those involved in production agriculture, as well as those in agri-businesses.

He will be followed by Norm Dalsted, an extension farm and ranch management economist from Colorado State University who will discuss financial management of agricultural operations.

Both talks will be given in the Events Center Room A.

They will start the three days of seminars for cattle and dairy producers, horse owners, hay and forage producers, partners in ag presentations and a Colorado weather report by Nolan Doesken, state climatologist from CSU.

Larry Connell said he was somewhat surprised but appreciative when he was informed he will be honored as the Colorado Farm Show Volunteer of the Year at the 2010 show, which starts Tuesday.

“I appreciate it, I really do. It’s been a good bunch of guys that I’ve worked with,” Connell said.

A member of the buildings and grounds committee since 2003, Connell and his group of 8-10 volunteers are responsible for setting up signs, getting all the electrical and fire extinguishers set up prior to the show, then helping with traffic during and after the show each year.

The annual show is planned and conducted by a group of about 100 volunteers. Exhibitions and programs will be open to the public, at no cost, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday for the 2010 show.

Mark Long of Windsor is in his second and last year as general chairman of the farm show and said he has not seen any real effect as a result of the economy on this year’s show. He said all the spaces for vendors are sold out.

“We lost one big implement dealer from Fort Collins, but sold that space instantly. And we still have a waiting list to get into the show, and I think there’s still about 15 on the list,” Long said.

He said he’s expecting good crowds again this year, which for the past 10 years or so has approached 30,000 visitors for the three-day show.

“Last year, we had to open the overflow parking lot on the first day and that’s the first time that’s happened. We’re hoping for the same again this year,” Long said.

Parking for the show is $5, which is good for one day or all three days. Money raised from parking fees is used to fund scholarships to high school students from around the state. Each year, the farm show awards six of those scholarships named in memory of Chuck Urano, a former horticulturist at the Weld County office of Colorado State University and one of the five founders of what was to become the farm show in 1967 in downtown Greeley.

The show is now conducted from facilities at Greeley’s Island Grove Regional Park, including the Events Center, Exhibition and 4-H buildings, and the livestock pavilion.

Connell, who farms south of Kersey and has his own trucking business hauling his own grain and hay, as well as corn stalks following each year’s harvest, will take some time out this week to be at the show. The corn stalks, he added, are used by dairies and feedlots in the area.

“Usually, I’ve had 100 or so loads of corn stalks by this time of the year, but so far I’ve only done 10 or 12. It’s just been one of those years trying to get the corn harvested and getting the stalks out of the fields,” Connell said.

The theme for this year’s show is Saluting American Agriculture.

Credit dynamics and volatility of agricultural lending will lead off this year’s show at 10 a.m. Tuesday. Dennis Blick, a senior vice president and regional manager for CoBank of Wichita, Kan., will give a brief overview of the “housing bubble” and how the ensuing credit crisis has hit all aspects of bank/borrower relationships. He will discuss the current bank regulatory environment and its impact on lending practices, including how traditional credit risks and “new” risks have evolved.

Blick will also review some of the factors that influence the perspectives of bankers lending to those involved in production agriculture, as well as those in agri-businesses.

He will be followed by Norm Dalsted, an extension farm and ranch management economist from Colorado State University who will discuss financial management of agricultural operations.

Both talks will be given in the Events Center Room A.

They will start the three days of seminars for cattle and dairy producers, horse owners, hay and forage producers, partners in ag presentations and a Colorado weather report by Nolan Doesken, state climatologist from CSU.


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