Kettle corn aroma – What makes it so special? | TheFencePost.com

Kettle corn aroma – What makes it so special?

Fred Hendricks
Bucyrus, Ohio

The owner, Helen Picking Neff, is shown at the original desk in the office of D. Picking & Co.

Is there anything more tantalizing than the aroma of kettle corn when it fills the air? Its richness is soothing. Cooking methods have changed over time, but kettle corn still has that addicting taste of slightly sweet, slightly salty. And the compulsion to satisfy that taste is often overcome with the purchase of a bag to munch on the spot or take home to enjoy later.

What makes the aroma of kettle corn and therefore its sumptuous taste so unique? The countless vendors of this centuries old tradition all claim their special recipe. Certainly the basic ingredients of granulated sugar, salt and oil are foundational along with each vendor’s added touch. And yet, there is one common denominator they all assert; the cooper kettle used in cooking the corn.

The ancient art of making copper kettles has a storied history. Going back thousands of years, the ancients considered copper to be the most important of the seven basic metals. From it they made armor, cooking utensils, tools and articles of personal adornment. Our English forefathers brought copper cooking vessels to this country. And while these utensils were commonplace in colonial days, their use has diminished over time.

Is there anything more tantalizing than the aroma of kettle corn when it fills the air? Its richness is soothing. Cooking methods have changed over time, but kettle corn still has that addicting taste of slightly sweet, slightly salty. And the compulsion to satisfy that taste is often overcome with the purchase of a bag to munch on the spot or take home to enjoy later.

What makes the aroma of kettle corn and therefore its sumptuous taste so unique? The countless vendors of this centuries old tradition all claim their special recipe. Certainly the basic ingredients of granulated sugar, salt and oil are foundational along with each vendor’s added touch. And yet, there is one common denominator they all assert; the cooper kettle used in cooking the corn.

The ancient art of making copper kettles has a storied history. Going back thousands of years, the ancients considered copper to be the most important of the seven basic metals. From it they made armor, cooking utensils, tools and articles of personal adornment. Our English forefathers brought copper cooking vessels to this country. And while these utensils were commonplace in colonial days, their use has diminished over time.

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Is there anything more tantalizing than the aroma of kettle corn when it fills the air? Its richness is soothing. Cooking methods have changed over time, but kettle corn still has that addicting taste of slightly sweet, slightly salty. And the compulsion to satisfy that taste is often overcome with the purchase of a bag to munch on the spot or take home to enjoy later.

What makes the aroma of kettle corn and therefore its sumptuous taste so unique? The countless vendors of this centuries old tradition all claim their special recipe. Certainly the basic ingredients of granulated sugar, salt and oil are foundational along with each vendor’s added touch. And yet, there is one common denominator they all assert; the cooper kettle used in cooking the corn.

The ancient art of making copper kettles has a storied history. Going back thousands of years, the ancients considered copper to be the most important of the seven basic metals. From it they made armor, cooking utensils, tools and articles of personal adornment. Our English forefathers brought copper cooking vessels to this country. And while these utensils were commonplace in colonial days, their use has diminished over time.

Is there anything more tantalizing than the aroma of kettle corn when it fills the air? Its richness is soothing. Cooking methods have changed over time, but kettle corn still has that addicting taste of slightly sweet, slightly salty. And the compulsion to satisfy that taste is often overcome with the purchase of a bag to munch on the spot or take home to enjoy later.

What makes the aroma of kettle corn and therefore its sumptuous taste so unique? The countless vendors of this centuries old tradition all claim their special recipe. Certainly the basic ingredients of granulated sugar, salt and oil are foundational along with each vendor’s added touch. And yet, there is one common denominator they all assert; the cooper kettle used in cooking the corn.

The ancient art of making copper kettles has a storied history. Going back thousands of years, the ancients considered copper to be the most important of the seven basic metals. From it they made armor, cooking utensils, tools and articles of personal adornment. Our English forefathers brought copper cooking vessels to this country. And while these utensils were commonplace in colonial days, their use has diminished over time.

Is there anything more tantalizing than the aroma of kettle corn when it fills the air? Its richness is soothing. Cooking methods have changed over time, but kettle corn still has that addicting taste of slightly sweet, slightly salty. And the compulsion to satisfy that taste is often overcome with the purchase of a bag to munch on the spot or take home to enjoy later.

What makes the aroma of kettle corn and therefore its sumptuous taste so unique? The countless vendors of this centuries old tradition all claim their special recipe. Certainly the basic ingredients of granulated sugar, salt and oil are foundational along with each vendor’s added touch. And yet, there is one common denominator they all assert; the cooper kettle used in cooking the corn.

The ancient art of making copper kettles has a storied history. Going back thousands of years, the ancients considered copper to be the most important of the seven basic metals. From it they made armor, cooking utensils, tools and articles of personal adornment. Our English forefathers brought copper cooking vessels to this country. And while these utensils were commonplace in colonial days, their use has diminished over time.

Is there anything more tantalizing than the aroma of kettle corn when it fills the air? Its richness is soothing. Cooking methods have changed over time, but kettle corn still has that addicting taste of slightly sweet, slightly salty. And the compulsion to satisfy that taste is often overcome with the purchase of a bag to munch on the spot or take home to enjoy later.

What makes the aroma of kettle corn and therefore its sumptuous taste so unique? The countless vendors of this centuries old tradition all claim their special recipe. Certainly the basic ingredients of granulated sugar, salt and oil are foundational along with each vendor’s added touch. And yet, there is one common denominator they all assert; the cooper kettle used in cooking the corn.

The ancient art of making copper kettles has a storied history. Going back thousands of years, the ancients considered copper to be the most important of the seven basic metals. From it they made armor, cooking utensils, tools and articles of personal adornment. Our English forefathers brought copper cooking vessels to this country. And while these utensils were commonplace in colonial days, their use has diminished over time.