Kids in the kitchen | TheFencePost.com

Kids in the kitchen

Anna Aughenbaugh
Fort Collins, Colo.

Children 2 to 5-years-old love to help. This time together makes them feel important and can be used to develop coordination, dexterity, and ability to follow directions.

They can put the silverware and napkins next to the plates. They can use a wire whisk to stir puddings or pancake batter. Whisking 1/2 cup plain yogurt and 1/2 cup orange juice for a snack will bring a smile to your helper’s face as it is enjoyed.

Little hands can tear lettuce for a salad, or pull grapes off the stems.

Older children can spread butter on toast, peanut butter and jelly on bread, frosting or cream cheese on graham crackers.

Children can think of cooking as a science project. They can learn how to measure liquid ingredients and to scoop and level dry ingredients in dry measuring cups. A dry measure cup is level at the top so ingredient can be leveled off with the back of a knife. Don’t shake or press down flour when you measure it. A liquid measuring cup is glass or plastic with a spout to aid in pouring. Shortening may be packed into a dry measuring cup, or use the water displacement method. If a recipe calls for 1/2 cup of shortening, put 1/2 cup cold water into a 1 cup liquid measuring cup. Spoon in shortening until the water reaches the 1 cup line.

They enjoy rolling out and cutting or dropping cookie dough by teaspoons onto cookie sheets. Using clean hands, they can mix ingredients for meatloaf.

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Learning to break an egg into a dish (not into the ingredients in case bits of shells need to be removed, or worse yet, the egg is rotten) is a big accomplishment.

Ten to 14-year-olds can learn to read and follow recipes. Have them read all the way through the recipe then assemble ingredients in the order they will be used. This assures that you have all the ingredients and won’t accidentally omit any.

With a little help from a patient adult, children can prepare easy to do recipes from ‘scratch’, adding to their self esteem and giving them knowledge that will last a life time.

These recipes are fun for the children to help with. When the cookies have cooled, little ones can put them into the cookie jar or tins.

Children 2 to 5-years-old love to help. This time together makes them feel important and can be used to develop coordination, dexterity, and ability to follow directions.

They can put the silverware and napkins next to the plates. They can use a wire whisk to stir puddings or pancake batter. Whisking 1/2 cup plain yogurt and 1/2 cup orange juice for a snack will bring a smile to your helper’s face as it is enjoyed.

Little hands can tear lettuce for a salad, or pull grapes off the stems.

Older children can spread butter on toast, peanut butter and jelly on bread, frosting or cream cheese on graham crackers.

Children can think of cooking as a science project. They can learn how to measure liquid ingredients and to scoop and level dry ingredients in dry measuring cups. A dry measure cup is level at the top so ingredient can be leveled off with the back of a knife. Don’t shake or press down flour when you measure it. A liquid measuring cup is glass or plastic with a spout to aid in pouring. Shortening may be packed into a dry measuring cup, or use the water displacement method. If a recipe calls for 1/2 cup of shortening, put 1/2 cup cold water into a 1 cup liquid measuring cup. Spoon in shortening until the water reaches the 1 cup line.

They enjoy rolling out and cutting or dropping cookie dough by teaspoons onto cookie sheets. Using clean hands, they can mix ingredients for meatloaf.

Learning to break an egg into a dish (not into the ingredients in case bits of shells need to be removed, or worse yet, the egg is rotten) is a big accomplishment.

Ten to 14-year-olds can learn to read and follow recipes. Have them read all the way through the recipe then assemble ingredients in the order they will be used. This assures that you have all the ingredients and won’t accidentally omit any.

With a little help from a patient adult, children can prepare easy to do recipes from ‘scratch’, adding to their self esteem and giving them knowledge that will last a life time.

These recipes are fun for the children to help with. When the cookies have cooled, little ones can put them into the cookie jar or tins.

Children 2 to 5-years-old love to help. This time together makes them feel important and can be used to develop coordination, dexterity, and ability to follow directions.

They can put the silverware and napkins next to the plates. They can use a wire whisk to stir puddings or pancake batter. Whisking 1/2 cup plain yogurt and 1/2 cup orange juice for a snack will bring a smile to your helper’s face as it is enjoyed.

Little hands can tear lettuce for a salad, or pull grapes off the stems.

Older children can spread butter on toast, peanut butter and jelly on bread, frosting or cream cheese on graham crackers.

Children can think of cooking as a science project. They can learn how to measure liquid ingredients and to scoop and level dry ingredients in dry measuring cups. A dry measure cup is level at the top so ingredient can be leveled off with the back of a knife. Don’t shake or press down flour when you measure it. A liquid measuring cup is glass or plastic with a spout to aid in pouring. Shortening may be packed into a dry measuring cup, or use the water displacement method. If a recipe calls for 1/2 cup of shortening, put 1/2 cup cold water into a 1 cup liquid measuring cup. Spoon in shortening until the water reaches the 1 cup line.

They enjoy rolling out and cutting or dropping cookie dough by teaspoons onto cookie sheets. Using clean hands, they can mix ingredients for meatloaf.

Learning to break an egg into a dish (not into the ingredients in case bits of shells need to be removed, or worse yet, the egg is rotten) is a big accomplishment.

Ten to 14-year-olds can learn to read and follow recipes. Have them read all the way through the recipe then assemble ingredients in the order they will be used. This assures that you have all the ingredients and won’t accidentally omit any.

With a little help from a patient adult, children can prepare easy to do recipes from ‘scratch’, adding to their self esteem and giving them knowledge that will last a life time.

These recipes are fun for the children to help with. When the cookies have cooled, little ones can put them into the cookie jar or tins.

Children 2 to 5-years-old love to help. This time together makes them feel important and can be used to develop coordination, dexterity, and ability to follow directions.

They can put the silverware and napkins next to the plates. They can use a wire whisk to stir puddings or pancake batter. Whisking 1/2 cup plain yogurt and 1/2 cup orange juice for a snack will bring a smile to your helper’s face as it is enjoyed.

Little hands can tear lettuce for a salad, or pull grapes off the stems.

Older children can spread butter on toast, peanut butter and jelly on bread, frosting or cream cheese on graham crackers.

Children can think of cooking as a science project. They can learn how to measure liquid ingredients and to scoop and level dry ingredients in dry measuring cups. A dry measure cup is level at the top so ingredient can be leveled off with the back of a knife. Don’t shake or press down flour when you measure it. A liquid measuring cup is glass or plastic with a spout to aid in pouring. Shortening may be packed into a dry measuring cup, or use the water displacement method. If a recipe calls for 1/2 cup of shortening, put 1/2 cup cold water into a 1 cup liquid measuring cup. Spoon in shortening until the water reaches the 1 cup line.

They enjoy rolling out and cutting or dropping cookie dough by teaspoons onto cookie sheets. Using clean hands, they can mix ingredients for meatloaf.

Learning to break an egg into a dish (not into the ingredients in case bits of shells need to be removed, or worse yet, the egg is rotten) is a big accomplishment.

Ten to 14-year-olds can learn to read and follow recipes. Have them read all the way through the recipe then assemble ingredients in the order they will be used. This assures that you have all the ingredients and won’t accidentally omit any.

With a little help from a patient adult, children can prepare easy to do recipes from ‘scratch’, adding to their self esteem and giving them knowledge that will last a life time.

These recipes are fun for the children to help with. When the cookies have cooled, little ones can put them into the cookie jar or tins.