Local cowboys fair well at Wrangler National Finals Rodeo | TheFencePost.com

Local cowboys fair well at Wrangler National Finals Rodeo

Robyn Scherer, M.Agr.
Staff Reporter

Las Vegas can be considered the city of luck for many people, but for professional cowboys, it takes more than luck to become a world champion. For local cowboys in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska, the NFR was a chance to chase their dreams.

The NFR, which ran from December 1-10 in Las Vegas, Nev., was attended by hundreds of thousands of people. Competitors competed in seven events including bareback riding, steer wrestling, team roping, saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

“This rodeo has been sold out for every performance for the last 20 years. The winners this year was a wonderful mix of champions like Trevor Brazile, and new champions who came back from way back in the pack to win the average. They thought it was never gonna happen,” said Jim Bainbridge, senior public relations coordinator for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

The winner of the bareback riding event was Kaycee Feild from Payson, Utah. He rode all 10 bulls, with a total score of 860.5. He won the average, and the world title. He earned a total of $319,986, which was a single-season record.

Steven Dent, from Mullen, Neb., was fourth in the average and fourth in the world standings. Casey Colletti, from Pueblo, Colo., finished fifth in the average and fifth in the world.

Colletti grew up around rodeo, and learned from his father, who rode bareback horses for 20 years. Colletti got on his first horse at 17, and going to the NFR has always been a dream of his.

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“The biggest dream I had was to win a world title but just making it to the NFR is big. You work at it your whole life to make it, and then you do. It’s surreal,” he said.

He continued, “I didn’t know what to expect getting down there. You are getting on the rankest bareback horses in the world. They are the best of the best. I expect myself, as far as a personal goal, to ride all of them. I wanted to ride all 10. I had to have a winning attitude. I drove out to Vegas by myself, so I had a vehicle out there, and I had a lot of thinking on the way down. I told myself I wanted to keep a positive attitude about it. I might never get to go again, and I might go the next 10 years. I wanted to be able to enjoy the experience. I didn’t want to think this wasn’t fun anymore. I wanted to take in all the experience, good or bad and just have fun.”

In steer wrestling, the overall world champion and average winner was Luke Branquinho of Los Alamos, Calif., who posted 41.9 seconds on 10 head. Jason Miller, from Lance Creek, Wyo., was fifth in the average, and third in the world standings. Dean Gorsuch, from Gering, Neb., finished eighth in the average, and fifth in the world standings.

“My family has always been in rodeo. Since I was 4, I knew that is all I wanted to do. I wanted to go to the finals and win a world championship. My dad was a bulldogger, and then I got into it, so I just love the steer wrestling. I liked the other events, but I was really dedicated to steer wrestling,” said Gorsuch.

Gorsuch is no stranger to the winner’s circle. He won the world championship in 2006 and 2010, and has made the finals six times. He continued, “This year was a good year. Even though I missed a steer, you never quit. I knew it probably took me out of the world championship. Luke, he deserved it. He made 10 great runs. We are good friends, and I am happy for him.”

The only world champion to come out of the event was Jhett Johnson, who won the team roping – heeling title. Johnson is from Casper, Wyo., and ropes with his partner Turtle Powell, from Stephenville, Texas.

Johnson finished the NFR first in the average as well. He and Powell had nine complete runs, with a total time of 57.5 seconds. He earned a total of $45,865 while in Vegas, and $197,112 over the course of the year.

The duo also broke the NFR earnings record, which was set last year by Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith. The old record was $120,419, and Johnson and Powell earned $125,625 over 10 rounds.

Johnson entered the NFR with a year earnings of $71,487, and was in 12th place. Powell had earned $69,782 and was in 13th. The two placed in seven of the 10 rounds, to move from their entry places to first.

Johnson and his partner won round five, which was especially important to Johnson. He is a cancer survivor, and round five was the Tough Enough to Wear Pink night. He was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the 1990s, and is now cancer free. The TEWP campaign has raised $12 million in the battle against breast cancer, according to the PRCA.

In saddle bronc riding, Jesse Wright, from Milford, Utah, won the average. He posted 848.5 points on 10 head. The world title went to Taos Muncy, from Corona, N.M., who earned $249,914 on the year.

Tuf Cooper of Decatur, Texas, was the world champion in the tie-down roping event. Cooper, who is only 21, won his first world championship this year. He has competed in the NFR for four years. He earned a total of $192,042 on the year. The average winner was Matt Shiozawa from Chubbuck, Idaho, who posted 88.3 seconds on 10 head.

In barrel racing, Lindsay Sears won the world title and the average. Sears, from Nanton, Alberta, posted a time of 139.5 seconds on 10 runs, and earned $238,864 over the year.

In the final event, bull riding, the world title went to Shane Proctor of Grand Coulee, Wash., who earned $238,249 on the year. Proctor broke his free arm in the final round, after he was bucked off Power River Rodeo’s Black Attack when the bull stepped on him. He is undergoing surgery and is expected to be able to return in eight to 12 weeks.

The average winner was L.J. Jenkins of Porum, Okla., who posted 501 points on six head. He earned a total of $45,865 over 10 rounds. Gillette, Wyo., cowboy Bobby Welsh finished second in the average, and fourth in the world standings.

Tyler Willis, from Wheatland, Wyo., finished third in the average, and sixth in the world standings. Seth Glause, from Cheyenne, Wyo., finished 10th in the average, and 10th in the world standings.

“Winning the first round was really special to me. That stood out as the number one thing. The whole experience was pretty phenomenal though. It’s been a dream since I was a kid, and to actually be there is amazing,” said Glause.

The all-around world championship was won again by Trevor Brazile, who claimed his sixth all-around average title, tied the record with Ty Murray. He also won his ninth world all-around title, which is two more than anyone else.

“He was the only one who qualified in more than one event,” said Bainbridge.

The biggest change in the NFR this year was in the live coverage. The event was moved this year from ESPN to Great American Country (GAC), and every ride and run were televised.

“This is the first year we have been with GAC. They were committed to running every run and every ride, so a two-hour rodeo was a three-hour broadcast. The viewers got to see everything. This year the response to that was tremendous. All 10 performances were live for the first time ever. We had a lot of interview and features, but we also didn’t miss any of the rodeo,” said Bainbridge.

Overall, the rodeo was a great success for both participants and spectators. “I thank everyone for their support and well-wishes. It still means a lot to me that they are people out there who support me,” said Colletti.

Las Vegas can be considered the city of luck for many people, but for professional cowboys, it takes more than luck to become a world champion. For local cowboys in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska, the NFR was a chance to chase their dreams.

The NFR, which ran from December 1-10 in Las Vegas, Nev., was attended by hundreds of thousands of people. Competitors competed in seven events including bareback riding, steer wrestling, team roping, saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

“This rodeo has been sold out for every performance for the last 20 years. The winners this year was a wonderful mix of champions like Trevor Brazile, and new champions who came back from way back in the pack to win the average. They thought it was never gonna happen,” said Jim Bainbridge, senior public relations coordinator for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

The winner of the bareback riding event was Kaycee Feild from Payson, Utah. He rode all 10 bulls, with a total score of 860.5. He won the average, and the world title. He earned a total of $319,986, which was a single-season record.

Steven Dent, from Mullen, Neb., was fourth in the average and fourth in the world standings. Casey Colletti, from Pueblo, Colo., finished fifth in the average and fifth in the world.

Colletti grew up around rodeo, and learned from his father, who rode bareback horses for 20 years. Colletti got on his first horse at 17, and going to the NFR has always been a dream of his.

“The biggest dream I had was to win a world title but just making it to the NFR is big. You work at it your whole life to make it, and then you do. It’s surreal,” he said.

He continued, “I didn’t know what to expect getting down there. You are getting on the rankest bareback horses in the world. They are the best of the best. I expect myself, as far as a personal goal, to ride all of them. I wanted to ride all 10. I had to have a winning attitude. I drove out to Vegas by myself, so I had a vehicle out there, and I had a lot of thinking on the way down. I told myself I wanted to keep a positive attitude about it. I might never get to go again, and I might go the next 10 years. I wanted to be able to enjoy the experience. I didn’t want to think this wasn’t fun anymore. I wanted to take in all the experience, good or bad and just have fun.”

In steer wrestling, the overall world champion and average winner was Luke Branquinho of Los Alamos, Calif., who posted 41.9 seconds on 10 head. Jason Miller, from Lance Creek, Wyo., was fifth in the average, and third in the world standings. Dean Gorsuch, from Gering, Neb., finished eighth in the average, and fifth in the world standings.

“My family has always been in rodeo. Since I was 4, I knew that is all I wanted to do. I wanted to go to the finals and win a world championship. My dad was a bulldogger, and then I got into it, so I just love the steer wrestling. I liked the other events, but I was really dedicated to steer wrestling,” said Gorsuch.

Gorsuch is no stranger to the winner’s circle. He won the world championship in 2006 and 2010, and has made the finals six times. He continued, “This year was a good year. Even though I missed a steer, you never quit. I knew it probably took me out of the world championship. Luke, he deserved it. He made 10 great runs. We are good friends, and I am happy for him.”

The only world champion to come out of the event was Jhett Johnson, who won the team roping – heeling title. Johnson is from Casper, Wyo., and ropes with his partner Turtle Powell, from Stephenville, Texas.

Johnson finished the NFR first in the average as well. He and Powell had nine complete runs, with a total time of 57.5 seconds. He earned a total of $45,865 while in Vegas, and $197,112 over the course of the year.

The duo also broke the NFR earnings record, which was set last year by Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith. The old record was $120,419, and Johnson and Powell earned $125,625 over 10 rounds.

Johnson entered the NFR with a year earnings of $71,487, and was in 12th place. Powell had earned $69,782 and was in 13th. The two placed in seven of the 10 rounds, to move from their entry places to first.

Johnson and his partner won round five, which was especially important to Johnson. He is a cancer survivor, and round five was the Tough Enough to Wear Pink night. He was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the 1990s, and is now cancer free. The TEWP campaign has raised $12 million in the battle against breast cancer, according to the PRCA.

In saddle bronc riding, Jesse Wright, from Milford, Utah, won the average. He posted 848.5 points on 10 head. The world title went to Taos Muncy, from Corona, N.M., who earned $249,914 on the year.

Tuf Cooper of Decatur, Texas, was the world champion in the tie-down roping event. Cooper, who is only 21, won his first world championship this year. He has competed in the NFR for four years. He earned a total of $192,042 on the year. The average winner was Matt Shiozawa from Chubbuck, Idaho, who posted 88.3 seconds on 10 head.

In barrel racing, Lindsay Sears won the world title and the average. Sears, from Nanton, Alberta, posted a time of 139.5 seconds on 10 runs, and earned $238,864 over the year.

In the final event, bull riding, the world title went to Shane Proctor of Grand Coulee, Wash., who earned $238,249 on the year. Proctor broke his free arm in the final round, after he was bucked off Power River Rodeo’s Black Attack when the bull stepped on him. He is undergoing surgery and is expected to be able to return in eight to 12 weeks.

The average winner was L.J. Jenkins of Porum, Okla., who posted 501 points on six head. He earned a total of $45,865 over 10 rounds. Gillette, Wyo., cowboy Bobby Welsh finished second in the average, and fourth in the world standings.

Tyler Willis, from Wheatland, Wyo., finished third in the average, and sixth in the world standings. Seth Glause, from Cheyenne, Wyo., finished 10th in the average, and 10th in the world standings.

“Winning the first round was really special to me. That stood out as the number one thing. The whole experience was pretty phenomenal though. It’s been a dream since I was a kid, and to actually be there is amazing,” said Glause.

The all-around world championship was won again by Trevor Brazile, who claimed his sixth all-around average title, tied the record with Ty Murray. He also won his ninth world all-around title, which is two more than anyone else.

“He was the only one who qualified in more than one event,” said Bainbridge.

The biggest change in the NFR this year was in the live coverage. The event was moved this year from ESPN to Great American Country (GAC), and every ride and run were televised.

“This is the first year we have been with GAC. They were committed to running every run and every ride, so a two-hour rodeo was a three-hour broadcast. The viewers got to see everything. This year the response to that was tremendous. All 10 performances were live for the first time ever. We had a lot of interview and features, but we also didn’t miss any of the rodeo,” said Bainbridge.

Overall, the rodeo was a great success for both participants and spectators. “I thank everyone for their support and well-wishes. It still means a lot to me that they are people out there who support me,” said Colletti.

Las Vegas can be considered the city of luck for many people, but for professional cowboys, it takes more than luck to become a world champion. For local cowboys in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska, the NFR was a chance to chase their dreams.

The NFR, which ran from December 1-10 in Las Vegas, Nev., was attended by hundreds of thousands of people. Competitors competed in seven events including bareback riding, steer wrestling, team roping, saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

“This rodeo has been sold out for every performance for the last 20 years. The winners this year was a wonderful mix of champions like Trevor Brazile, and new champions who came back from way back in the pack to win the average. They thought it was never gonna happen,” said Jim Bainbridge, senior public relations coordinator for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

The winner of the bareback riding event was Kaycee Feild from Payson, Utah. He rode all 10 bulls, with a total score of 860.5. He won the average, and the world title. He earned a total of $319,986, which was a single-season record.

Steven Dent, from Mullen, Neb., was fourth in the average and fourth in the world standings. Casey Colletti, from Pueblo, Colo., finished fifth in the average and fifth in the world.

Colletti grew up around rodeo, and learned from his father, who rode bareback horses for 20 years. Colletti got on his first horse at 17, and going to the NFR has always been a dream of his.

“The biggest dream I had was to win a world title but just making it to the NFR is big. You work at it your whole life to make it, and then you do. It’s surreal,” he said.

He continued, “I didn’t know what to expect getting down there. You are getting on the rankest bareback horses in the world. They are the best of the best. I expect myself, as far as a personal goal, to ride all of them. I wanted to ride all 10. I had to have a winning attitude. I drove out to Vegas by myself, so I had a vehicle out there, and I had a lot of thinking on the way down. I told myself I wanted to keep a positive attitude about it. I might never get to go again, and I might go the next 10 years. I wanted to be able to enjoy the experience. I didn’t want to think this wasn’t fun anymore. I wanted to take in all the experience, good or bad and just have fun.”

In steer wrestling, the overall world champion and average winner was Luke Branquinho of Los Alamos, Calif., who posted 41.9 seconds on 10 head. Jason Miller, from Lance Creek, Wyo., was fifth in the average, and third in the world standings. Dean Gorsuch, from Gering, Neb., finished eighth in the average, and fifth in the world standings.

“My family has always been in rodeo. Since I was 4, I knew that is all I wanted to do. I wanted to go to the finals and win a world championship. My dad was a bulldogger, and then I got into it, so I just love the steer wrestling. I liked the other events, but I was really dedicated to steer wrestling,” said Gorsuch.

Gorsuch is no stranger to the winner’s circle. He won the world championship in 2006 and 2010, and has made the finals six times. He continued, “This year was a good year. Even though I missed a steer, you never quit. I knew it probably took me out of the world championship. Luke, he deserved it. He made 10 great runs. We are good friends, and I am happy for him.”

The only world champion to come out of the event was Jhett Johnson, who won the team roping – heeling title. Johnson is from Casper, Wyo., and ropes with his partner Turtle Powell, from Stephenville, Texas.

Johnson finished the NFR first in the average as well. He and Powell had nine complete runs, with a total time of 57.5 seconds. He earned a total of $45,865 while in Vegas, and $197,112 over the course of the year.

The duo also broke the NFR earnings record, which was set last year by Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith. The old record was $120,419, and Johnson and Powell earned $125,625 over 10 rounds.

Johnson entered the NFR with a year earnings of $71,487, and was in 12th place. Powell had earned $69,782 and was in 13th. The two placed in seven of the 10 rounds, to move from their entry places to first.

Johnson and his partner won round five, which was especially important to Johnson. He is a cancer survivor, and round five was the Tough Enough to Wear Pink night. He was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the 1990s, and is now cancer free. The TEWP campaign has raised $12 million in the battle against breast cancer, according to the PRCA.

In saddle bronc riding, Jesse Wright, from Milford, Utah, won the average. He posted 848.5 points on 10 head. The world title went to Taos Muncy, from Corona, N.M., who earned $249,914 on the year.

Tuf Cooper of Decatur, Texas, was the world champion in the tie-down roping event. Cooper, who is only 21, won his first world championship this year. He has competed in the NFR for four years. He earned a total of $192,042 on the year. The average winner was Matt Shiozawa from Chubbuck, Idaho, who posted 88.3 seconds on 10 head.

In barrel racing, Lindsay Sears won the world title and the average. Sears, from Nanton, Alberta, posted a time of 139.5 seconds on 10 runs, and earned $238,864 over the year.

In the final event, bull riding, the world title went to Shane Proctor of Grand Coulee, Wash., who earned $238,249 on the year. Proctor broke his free arm in the final round, after he was bucked off Power River Rodeo’s Black Attack when the bull stepped on him. He is undergoing surgery and is expected to be able to return in eight to 12 weeks.

The average winner was L.J. Jenkins of Porum, Okla., who posted 501 points on six head. He earned a total of $45,865 over 10 rounds. Gillette, Wyo., cowboy Bobby Welsh finished second in the average, and fourth in the world standings.

Tyler Willis, from Wheatland, Wyo., finished third in the average, and sixth in the world standings. Seth Glause, from Cheyenne, Wyo., finished 10th in the average, and 10th in the world standings.

“Winning the first round was really special to me. That stood out as the number one thing. The whole experience was pretty phenomenal though. It’s been a dream since I was a kid, and to actually be there is amazing,” said Glause.

The all-around world championship was won again by Trevor Brazile, who claimed his sixth all-around average title, tied the record with Ty Murray. He also won his ninth world all-around title, which is two more than anyone else.

“He was the only one who qualified in more than one event,” said Bainbridge.

The biggest change in the NFR this year was in the live coverage. The event was moved this year from ESPN to Great American Country (GAC), and every ride and run were televised.

“This is the first year we have been with GAC. They were committed to running every run and every ride, so a two-hour rodeo was a three-hour broadcast. The viewers got to see everything. This year the response to that was tremendous. All 10 performances were live for the first time ever. We had a lot of interview and features, but we also didn’t miss any of the rodeo,” said Bainbridge.

Overall, the rodeo was a great success for both participants and spectators. “I thank everyone for their support and well-wishes. It still means a lot to me that they are people out there who support me,” said Colletti.

Las Vegas can be considered the city of luck for many people, but for professional cowboys, it takes more than luck to become a world champion. For local cowboys in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska, the NFR was a chance to chase their dreams.

The NFR, which ran from December 1-10 in Las Vegas, Nev., was attended by hundreds of thousands of people. Competitors competed in seven events including bareback riding, steer wrestling, team roping, saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

“This rodeo has been sold out for every performance for the last 20 years. The winners this year was a wonderful mix of champions like Trevor Brazile, and new champions who came back from way back in the pack to win the average. They thought it was never gonna happen,” said Jim Bainbridge, senior public relations coordinator for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

The winner of the bareback riding event was Kaycee Feild from Payson, Utah. He rode all 10 bulls, with a total score of 860.5. He won the average, and the world title. He earned a total of $319,986, which was a single-season record.

Steven Dent, from Mullen, Neb., was fourth in the average and fourth in the world standings. Casey Colletti, from Pueblo, Colo., finished fifth in the average and fifth in the world.

Colletti grew up around rodeo, and learned from his father, who rode bareback horses for 20 years. Colletti got on his first horse at 17, and going to the NFR has always been a dream of his.

“The biggest dream I had was to win a world title but just making it to the NFR is big. You work at it your whole life to make it, and then you do. It’s surreal,” he said.

He continued, “I didn’t know what to expect getting down there. You are getting on the rankest bareback horses in the world. They are the best of the best. I expect myself, as far as a personal goal, to ride all of them. I wanted to ride all 10. I had to have a winning attitude. I drove out to Vegas by myself, so I had a vehicle out there, and I had a lot of thinking on the way down. I told myself I wanted to keep a positive attitude about it. I might never get to go again, and I might go the next 10 years. I wanted to be able to enjoy the experience. I didn’t want to think this wasn’t fun anymore. I wanted to take in all the experience, good or bad and just have fun.”

In steer wrestling, the overall world champion and average winner was Luke Branquinho of Los Alamos, Calif., who posted 41.9 seconds on 10 head. Jason Miller, from Lance Creek, Wyo., was fifth in the average, and third in the world standings. Dean Gorsuch, from Gering, Neb., finished eighth in the average, and fifth in the world standings.

“My family has always been in rodeo. Since I was 4, I knew that is all I wanted to do. I wanted to go to the finals and win a world championship. My dad was a bulldogger, and then I got into it, so I just love the steer wrestling. I liked the other events, but I was really dedicated to steer wrestling,” said Gorsuch.

Gorsuch is no stranger to the winner’s circle. He won the world championship in 2006 and 2010, and has made the finals six times. He continued, “This year was a good year. Even though I missed a steer, you never quit. I knew it probably took me out of the world championship. Luke, he deserved it. He made 10 great runs. We are good friends, and I am happy for him.”

The only world champion to come out of the event was Jhett Johnson, who won the team roping – heeling title. Johnson is from Casper, Wyo., and ropes with his partner Turtle Powell, from Stephenville, Texas.

Johnson finished the NFR first in the average as well. He and Powell had nine complete runs, with a total time of 57.5 seconds. He earned a total of $45,865 while in Vegas, and $197,112 over the course of the year.

The duo also broke the NFR earnings record, which was set last year by Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith. The old record was $120,419, and Johnson and Powell earned $125,625 over 10 rounds.

Johnson entered the NFR with a year earnings of $71,487, and was in 12th place. Powell had earned $69,782 and was in 13th. The two placed in seven of the 10 rounds, to move from their entry places to first.

Johnson and his partner won round five, which was especially important to Johnson. He is a cancer survivor, and round five was the Tough Enough to Wear Pink night. He was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the 1990s, and is now cancer free. The TEWP campaign has raised $12 million in the battle against breast cancer, according to the PRCA.

In saddle bronc riding, Jesse Wright, from Milford, Utah, won the average. He posted 848.5 points on 10 head. The world title went to Taos Muncy, from Corona, N.M., who earned $249,914 on the year.

Tuf Cooper of Decatur, Texas, was the world champion in the tie-down roping event. Cooper, who is only 21, won his first world championship this year. He has competed in the NFR for four years. He earned a total of $192,042 on the year. The average winner was Matt Shiozawa from Chubbuck, Idaho, who posted 88.3 seconds on 10 head.

In barrel racing, Lindsay Sears won the world title and the average. Sears, from Nanton, Alberta, posted a time of 139.5 seconds on 10 runs, and earned $238,864 over the year.

In the final event, bull riding, the world title went to Shane Proctor of Grand Coulee, Wash., who earned $238,249 on the year. Proctor broke his free arm in the final round, after he was bucked off Power River Rodeo’s Black Attack when the bull stepped on him. He is undergoing surgery and is expected to be able to return in eight to 12 weeks.

The average winner was L.J. Jenkins of Porum, Okla., who posted 501 points on six head. He earned a total of $45,865 over 10 rounds. Gillette, Wyo., cowboy Bobby Welsh finished second in the average, and fourth in the world standings.

Tyler Willis, from Wheatland, Wyo., finished third in the average, and sixth in the world standings. Seth Glause, from Cheyenne, Wyo., finished 10th in the average, and 10th in the world standings.

“Winning the first round was really special to me. That stood out as the number one thing. The whole experience was pretty phenomenal though. It’s been a dream since I was a kid, and to actually be there is amazing,” said Glause.

The all-around world championship was won again by Trevor Brazile, who claimed his sixth all-around average title, tied the record with Ty Murray. He also won his ninth world all-around title, which is two more than anyone else.

“He was the only one who qualified in more than one event,” said Bainbridge.

The biggest change in the NFR this year was in the live coverage. The event was moved this year from ESPN to Great American Country (GAC), and every ride and run were televised.

“This is the first year we have been with GAC. They were committed to running every run and every ride, so a two-hour rodeo was a three-hour broadcast. The viewers got to see everything. This year the response to that was tremendous. All 10 performances were live for the first time ever. We had a lot of interview and features, but we also didn’t miss any of the rodeo,” said Bainbridge.

Overall, the rodeo was a great success for both participants and spectators. “I thank everyone for their support and well-wishes. It still means a lot to me that they are people out there who support me,” said Colletti.

Las Vegas can be considered the city of luck for many people, but for professional cowboys, it takes more than luck to become a world champion. For local cowboys in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska, the NFR was a chance to chase their dreams.

The NFR, which ran from December 1-10 in Las Vegas, Nev., was attended by hundreds of thousands of people. Competitors competed in seven events including bareback riding, steer wrestling, team roping, saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

“This rodeo has been sold out for every performance for the last 20 years. The winners this year was a wonderful mix of champions like Trevor Brazile, and new champions who came back from way back in the pack to win the average. They thought it was never gonna happen,” said Jim Bainbridge, senior public relations coordinator for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

The winner of the bareback riding event was Kaycee Feild from Payson, Utah. He rode all 10 bulls, with a total score of 860.5. He won the average, and the world title. He earned a total of $319,986, which was a single-season record.

Steven Dent, from Mullen, Neb., was fourth in the average and fourth in the world standings. Casey Colletti, from Pueblo, Colo., finished fifth in the average and fifth in the world.

Colletti grew up around rodeo, and learned from his father, who rode bareback horses for 20 years. Colletti got on his first horse at 17, and going to the NFR has always been a dream of his.

“The biggest dream I had was to win a world title but just making it to the NFR is big. You work at it your whole life to make it, and then you do. It’s surreal,” he said.

He continued, “I didn’t know what to expect getting down there. You are getting on the rankest bareback horses in the world. They are the best of the best. I expect myself, as far as a personal goal, to ride all of them. I wanted to ride all 10. I had to have a winning attitude. I drove out to Vegas by myself, so I had a vehicle out there, and I had a lot of thinking on the way down. I told myself I wanted to keep a positive attitude about it. I might never get to go again, and I might go the next 10 years. I wanted to be able to enjoy the experience. I didn’t want to think this wasn’t fun anymore. I wanted to take in all the experience, good or bad and just have fun.”

In steer wrestling, the overall world champion and average winner was Luke Branquinho of Los Alamos, Calif., who posted 41.9 seconds on 10 head. Jason Miller, from Lance Creek, Wyo., was fifth in the average, and third in the world standings. Dean Gorsuch, from Gering, Neb., finished eighth in the average, and fifth in the world standings.

“My family has always been in rodeo. Since I was 4, I knew that is all I wanted to do. I wanted to go to the finals and win a world championship. My dad was a bulldogger, and then I got into it, so I just love the steer wrestling. I liked the other events, but I was really dedicated to steer wrestling,” said Gorsuch.

Gorsuch is no stranger to the winner’s circle. He won the world championship in 2006 and 2010, and has made the finals six times. He continued, “This year was a good year. Even though I missed a steer, you never quit. I knew it probably took me out of the world championship. Luke, he deserved it. He made 10 great runs. We are good friends, and I am happy for him.”

The only world champion to come out of the event was Jhett Johnson, who won the team roping – heeling title. Johnson is from Casper, Wyo., and ropes with his partner Turtle Powell, from Stephenville, Texas.

Johnson finished the NFR first in the average as well. He and Powell had nine complete runs, with a total time of 57.5 seconds. He earned a total of $45,865 while in Vegas, and $197,112 over the course of the year.

The duo also broke the NFR earnings record, which was set last year by Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith. The old record was $120,419, and Johnson and Powell earned $125,625 over 10 rounds.

Johnson entered the NFR with a year earnings of $71,487, and was in 12th place. Powell had earned $69,782 and was in 13th. The two placed in seven of the 10 rounds, to move from their entry places to first.

Johnson and his partner won round five, which was especially important to Johnson. He is a cancer survivor, and round five was the Tough Enough to Wear Pink night. He was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the 1990s, and is now cancer free. The TEWP campaign has raised $12 million in the battle against breast cancer, according to the PRCA.

In saddle bronc riding, Jesse Wright, from Milford, Utah, won the average. He posted 848.5 points on 10 head. The world title went to Taos Muncy, from Corona, N.M., who earned $249,914 on the year.

Tuf Cooper of Decatur, Texas, was the world champion in the tie-down roping event. Cooper, who is only 21, won his first world championship this year. He has competed in the NFR for four years. He earned a total of $192,042 on the year. The average winner was Matt Shiozawa from Chubbuck, Idaho, who posted 88.3 seconds on 10 head.

In barrel racing, Lindsay Sears won the world title and the average. Sears, from Nanton, Alberta, posted a time of 139.5 seconds on 10 runs, and earned $238,864 over the year.

In the final event, bull riding, the world title went to Shane Proctor of Grand Coulee, Wash., who earned $238,249 on the year. Proctor broke his free arm in the final round, after he was bucked off Power River Rodeo’s Black Attack when the bull stepped on him. He is undergoing surgery and is expected to be able to return in eight to 12 weeks.

The average winner was L.J. Jenkins of Porum, Okla., who posted 501 points on six head. He earned a total of $45,865 over 10 rounds. Gillette, Wyo., cowboy Bobby Welsh finished second in the average, and fourth in the world standings.

Tyler Willis, from Wheatland, Wyo., finished third in the average, and sixth in the world standings. Seth Glause, from Cheyenne, Wyo., finished 10th in the average, and 10th in the world standings.

“Winning the first round was really special to me. That stood out as the number one thing. The whole experience was pretty phenomenal though. It’s been a dream since I was a kid, and to actually be there is amazing,” said Glause.

The all-around world championship was won again by Trevor Brazile, who claimed his sixth all-around average title, tied the record with Ty Murray. He also won his ninth world all-around title, which is two more than anyone else.

“He was the only one who qualified in more than one event,” said Bainbridge.

The biggest change in the NFR this year was in the live coverage. The event was moved this year from ESPN to Great American Country (GAC), and every ride and run were televised.

“This is the first year we have been with GAC. They were committed to running every run and every ride, so a two-hour rodeo was a three-hour broadcast. The viewers got to see everything. This year the response to that was tremendous. All 10 performances were live for the first time ever. We had a lot of interview and features, but we also didn’t miss any of the rodeo,” said Bainbridge.

Overall, the rodeo was a great success for both participants and spectators. “I thank everyone for their support and well-wishes. It still means a lot to me that they are people out there who support me,” said Colletti.

Las Vegas can be considered the city of luck for many people, but for professional cowboys, it takes more than luck to become a world champion. For local cowboys in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska, the NFR was a chance to chase their dreams.

The NFR, which ran from December 1-10 in Las Vegas, Nev., was attended by hundreds of thousands of people. Competitors competed in seven events including bareback riding, steer wrestling, team roping, saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

“This rodeo has been sold out for every performance for the last 20 years. The winners this year was a wonderful mix of champions like Trevor Brazile, and new champions who came back from way back in the pack to win the average. They thought it was never gonna happen,” said Jim Bainbridge, senior public relations coordinator for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

The winner of the bareback riding event was Kaycee Feild from Payson, Utah. He rode all 10 bulls, with a total score of 860.5. He won the average, and the world title. He earned a total of $319,986, which was a single-season record.

Steven Dent, from Mullen, Neb., was fourth in the average and fourth in the world standings. Casey Colletti, from Pueblo, Colo., finished fifth in the average and fifth in the world.

Colletti grew up around rodeo, and learned from his father, who rode bareback horses for 20 years. Colletti got on his first horse at 17, and going to the NFR has always been a dream of his.

“The biggest dream I had was to win a world title but just making it to the NFR is big. You work at it your whole life to make it, and then you do. It’s surreal,” he said.

He continued, “I didn’t know what to expect getting down there. You are getting on the rankest bareback horses in the world. They are the best of the best. I expect myself, as far as a personal goal, to ride all of them. I wanted to ride all 10. I had to have a winning attitude. I drove out to Vegas by myself, so I had a vehicle out there, and I had a lot of thinking on the way down. I told myself I wanted to keep a positive attitude about it. I might never get to go again, and I might go the next 10 years. I wanted to be able to enjoy the experience. I didn’t want to think this wasn’t fun anymore. I wanted to take in all the experience, good or bad and just have fun.”

In steer wrestling, the overall world champion and average winner was Luke Branquinho of Los Alamos, Calif., who posted 41.9 seconds on 10 head. Jason Miller, from Lance Creek, Wyo., was fifth in the average, and third in the world standings. Dean Gorsuch, from Gering, Neb., finished eighth in the average, and fifth in the world standings.

“My family has always been in rodeo. Since I was 4, I knew that is all I wanted to do. I wanted to go to the finals and win a world championship. My dad was a bulldogger, and then I got into it, so I just love the steer wrestling. I liked the other events, but I was really dedicated to steer wrestling,” said Gorsuch.

Gorsuch is no stranger to the winner’s circle. He won the world championship in 2006 and 2010, and has made the finals six times. He continued, “This year was a good year. Even though I missed a steer, you never quit. I knew it probably took me out of the world championship. Luke, he deserved it. He made 10 great runs. We are good friends, and I am happy for him.”

The only world champion to come out of the event was Jhett Johnson, who won the team roping – heeling title. Johnson is from Casper, Wyo., and ropes with his partner Turtle Powell, from Stephenville, Texas.

Johnson finished the NFR first in the average as well. He and Powell had nine complete runs, with a total time of 57.5 seconds. He earned a total of $45,865 while in Vegas, and $197,112 over the course of the year.

The duo also broke the NFR earnings record, which was set last year by Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith. The old record was $120,419, and Johnson and Powell earned $125,625 over 10 rounds.

Johnson entered the NFR with a year earnings of $71,487, and was in 12th place. Powell had earned $69,782 and was in 13th. The two placed in seven of the 10 rounds, to move from their entry places to first.

Johnson and his partner won round five, which was especially important to Johnson. He is a cancer survivor, and round five was the Tough Enough to Wear Pink night. He was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the 1990s, and is now cancer free. The TEWP campaign has raised $12 million in the battle against breast cancer, according to the PRCA.

In saddle bronc riding, Jesse Wright, from Milford, Utah, won the average. He posted 848.5 points on 10 head. The world title went to Taos Muncy, from Corona, N.M., who earned $249,914 on the year.

Tuf Cooper of Decatur, Texas, was the world champion in the tie-down roping event. Cooper, who is only 21, won his first world championship this year. He has competed in the NFR for four years. He earned a total of $192,042 on the year. The average winner was Matt Shiozawa from Chubbuck, Idaho, who posted 88.3 seconds on 10 head.

In barrel racing, Lindsay Sears won the world title and the average. Sears, from Nanton, Alberta, posted a time of 139.5 seconds on 10 runs, and earned $238,864 over the year.

In the final event, bull riding, the world title went to Shane Proctor of Grand Coulee, Wash., who earned $238,249 on the year. Proctor broke his free arm in the final round, after he was bucked off Power River Rodeo’s Black Attack when the bull stepped on him. He is undergoing surgery and is expected to be able to return in eight to 12 weeks.

The average winner was L.J. Jenkins of Porum, Okla., who posted 501 points on six head. He earned a total of $45,865 over 10 rounds. Gillette, Wyo., cowboy Bobby Welsh finished second in the average, and fourth in the world standings.

Tyler Willis, from Wheatland, Wyo., finished third in the average, and sixth in the world standings. Seth Glause, from Cheyenne, Wyo., finished 10th in the average, and 10th in the world standings.

“Winning the first round was really special to me. That stood out as the number one thing. The whole experience was pretty phenomenal though. It’s been a dream since I was a kid, and to actually be there is amazing,” said Glause.

The all-around world championship was won again by Trevor Brazile, who claimed his sixth all-around average title, tied the record with Ty Murray. He also won his ninth world all-around title, which is two more than anyone else.

“He was the only one who qualified in more than one event,” said Bainbridge.

The biggest change in the NFR this year was in the live coverage. The event was moved this year from ESPN to Great American Country (GAC), and every ride and run were televised.

“This is the first year we have been with GAC. They were committed to running every run and every ride, so a two-hour rodeo was a three-hour broadcast. The viewers got to see everything. This year the response to that was tremendous. All 10 performances were live for the first time ever. We had a lot of interview and features, but we also didn’t miss any of the rodeo,” said Bainbridge.

Overall, the rodeo was a great success for both participants and spectators. “I thank everyone for their support and well-wishes. It still means a lot to me that they are people out there who support me,” said Colletti.

Las Vegas can be considered the city of luck for many people, but for professional cowboys, it takes more than luck to become a world champion. For local cowboys in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska, the NFR was a chance to chase their dreams.

The NFR, which ran from December 1-10 in Las Vegas, Nev., was attended by hundreds of thousands of people. Competitors competed in seven events including bareback riding, steer wrestling, team roping, saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

“This rodeo has been sold out for every performance for the last 20 years. The winners this year was a wonderful mix of champions like Trevor Brazile, and new champions who came back from way back in the pack to win the average. They thought it was never gonna happen,” said Jim Bainbridge, senior public relations coordinator for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

The winner of the bareback riding event was Kaycee Feild from Payson, Utah. He rode all 10 bulls, with a total score of 860.5. He won the average, and the world title. He earned a total of $319,986, which was a single-season record.

Steven Dent, from Mullen, Neb., was fourth in the average and fourth in the world standings. Casey Colletti, from Pueblo, Colo., finished fifth in the average and fifth in the world.

Colletti grew up around rodeo, and learned from his father, who rode bareback horses for 20 years. Colletti got on his first horse at 17, and going to the NFR has always been a dream of his.

“The biggest dream I had was to win a world title but just making it to the NFR is big. You work at it your whole life to make it, and then you do. It’s surreal,” he said.

He continued, “I didn’t know what to expect getting down there. You are getting on the rankest bareback horses in the world. They are the best of the best. I expect myself, as far as a personal goal, to ride all of them. I wanted to ride all 10. I had to have a winning attitude. I drove out to Vegas by myself, so I had a vehicle out there, and I had a lot of thinking on the way down. I told myself I wanted to keep a positive attitude about it. I might never get to go again, and I might go the next 10 years. I wanted to be able to enjoy the experience. I didn’t want to think this wasn’t fun anymore. I wanted to take in all the experience, good or bad and just have fun.”

In steer wrestling, the overall world champion and average winner was Luke Branquinho of Los Alamos, Calif., who posted 41.9 seconds on 10 head. Jason Miller, from Lance Creek, Wyo., was fifth in the average, and third in the world standings. Dean Gorsuch, from Gering, Neb., finished eighth in the average, and fifth in the world standings.

“My family has always been in rodeo. Since I was 4, I knew that is all I wanted to do. I wanted to go to the finals and win a world championship. My dad was a bulldogger, and then I got into it, so I just love the steer wrestling. I liked the other events, but I was really dedicated to steer wrestling,” said Gorsuch.

Gorsuch is no stranger to the winner’s circle. He won the world championship in 2006 and 2010, and has made the finals six times. He continued, “This year was a good year. Even though I missed a steer, you never quit. I knew it probably took me out of the world championship. Luke, he deserved it. He made 10 great runs. We are good friends, and I am happy for him.”

The only world champion to come out of the event was Jhett Johnson, who won the team roping – heeling title. Johnson is from Casper, Wyo., and ropes with his partner Turtle Powell, from Stephenville, Texas.

Johnson finished the NFR first in the average as well. He and Powell had nine complete runs, with a total time of 57.5 seconds. He earned a total of $45,865 while in Vegas, and $197,112 over the course of the year.

The duo also broke the NFR earnings record, which was set last year by Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith. The old record was $120,419, and Johnson and Powell earned $125,625 over 10 rounds.

Johnson entered the NFR with a year earnings of $71,487, and was in 12th place. Powell had earned $69,782 and was in 13th. The two placed in seven of the 10 rounds, to move from their entry places to first.

Johnson and his partner won round five, which was especially important to Johnson. He is a cancer survivor, and round five was the Tough Enough to Wear Pink night. He was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the 1990s, and is now cancer free. The TEWP campaign has raised $12 million in the battle against breast cancer, according to the PRCA.

In saddle bronc riding, Jesse Wright, from Milford, Utah, won the average. He posted 848.5 points on 10 head. The world title went to Taos Muncy, from Corona, N.M., who earned $249,914 on the year.

Tuf Cooper of Decatur, Texas, was the world champion in the tie-down roping event. Cooper, who is only 21, won his first world championship this year. He has competed in the NFR for four years. He earned a total of $192,042 on the year. The average winner was Matt Shiozawa from Chubbuck, Idaho, who posted 88.3 seconds on 10 head.

In barrel racing, Lindsay Sears won the world title and the average. Sears, from Nanton, Alberta, posted a time of 139.5 seconds on 10 runs, and earned $238,864 over the year.

In the final event, bull riding, the world title went to Shane Proctor of Grand Coulee, Wash., who earned $238,249 on the year. Proctor broke his free arm in the final round, after he was bucked off Power River Rodeo’s Black Attack when the bull stepped on him. He is undergoing surgery and is expected to be able to return in eight to 12 weeks.

The average winner was L.J. Jenkins of Porum, Okla., who posted 501 points on six head. He earned a total of $45,865 over 10 rounds. Gillette, Wyo., cowboy Bobby Welsh finished second in the average, and fourth in the world standings.

Tyler Willis, from Wheatland, Wyo., finished third in the average, and sixth in the world standings. Seth Glause, from Cheyenne, Wyo., finished 10th in the average, and 10th in the world standings.

“Winning the first round was really special to me. That stood out as the number one thing. The whole experience was pretty phenomenal though. It’s been a dream since I was a kid, and to actually be there is amazing,” said Glause.

The all-around world championship was won again by Trevor Brazile, who claimed his sixth all-around average title, tied the record with Ty Murray. He also won his ninth world all-around title, which is two more than anyone else.

“He was the only one who qualified in more than one event,” said Bainbridge.

The biggest change in the NFR this year was in the live coverage. The event was moved this year from ESPN to Great American Country (GAC), and every ride and run were televised.

“This is the first year we have been with GAC. They were committed to running every run and every ride, so a two-hour rodeo was a three-hour broadcast. The viewers got to see everything. This year the response to that was tremendous. All 10 performances were live for the first time ever. We had a lot of interview and features, but we also didn’t miss any of the rodeo,” said Bainbridge.

Overall, the rodeo was a great success for both participants and spectators. “I thank everyone for their support and well-wishes. It still means a lot to me that they are people out there who support me,” said Colletti.