Loveland named Colorado’s official Veterans Day site | TheFencePost.com

Loveland named Colorado’s official Veterans Day site

Ella Marie Hayes
Saratoga, Wyo.

American Legion Commander Dan Diefenderfer and VFW commander Ed Aitkin post flags in the wreath at the end of the ceremony of those veterans who passed in the past year during the 2010 event.

For the third year straight Loveland has been recognized by the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington D.C. as an official regional Veterans Day site and Colorado’s official site for the observance of Veterans Day. Loveland is one of the few cities in the nation to received this recognition thanks to the many local veterans and volunteers who make this happen. These sites serve as models for other communities’ observance of Veteran’s Day.

Veteran’s Day is a national “thank you” to the men and women who have served all of us in uniform. These regional observances enable the federal government to bring resources closer to more veterans. This year’s special tribute is to the Female Veterans of the past and present.

World War I officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed June 28, 1919, but fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day. The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades, public meetings, and a brief suspension of business beginning at 11 a.m.

A congressional Act approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November a legal holiday known as Armistice Day. In 1954, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting in its place the word “Veterans” and November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

The Uniform Holiday Bill enacted in 1968 was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by celebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day and Columbus Day. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates causing much confusion. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of Veterans Day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of citizens, so in 1975 President Gerald R. Ford signed a law which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978.

The 2011 Loveland Veterans Day celebration begins from 4 a.m. to 6 a.m., with the Loveland Bell Ringers ringing the sound of freedom throughout the city. Tony DuMosch, American Legion Post 15 said, “Loveland still rings the bells of freedom just as they had done on Nov. 11, 1918. It was then that bells of all kinds rang around the world to signify the ‘war to end all wars’ was over.” (At that time no one could imagine any war being greater.)

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DuMosch continued, “The bells range in sizes from large church and school bells to small farm dinner bells. Each truck with a bell will have its own area of the city and ring the bells as they go through neighborhood streets.

By 6 a.m. the bells have stopped with only a few still ringing as they come through the Loveland Burial Park on Hwy 287 in honor of those who have passed. Over 50 American flags on 18-foot poles are raised by local Boy Scouts, veterans, and volunteers. Each of these casket flags were donated by a family member who wanted their loved one remembered every Veterans Day and Memorial Day.

From 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. breakfast will also be served at the Associated Vets Club at 305 Cleveland Ave. The public is invited for meals for an admission charge. The funds go to the Sons of the American Legion.

Veterans in full uniform from past and present eat free. To see uniforms and veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Cold War Era and even today’s modern wars on terror is a sight to behold, and brings a sense of history to life that no history books can do.

The Vets Club will be open (free) to the public to view table displays, but closes at 10:30 for the parade which begins at 11:11 a.m. (It was on the 11th month of the 11th day of the 11 hour and the 11th minute when the armistice was signed in 1918.)

The local Elks Club busses in hundreds of fifth graders from local schools to line the parade route along with hundreds of other spectators. Flags are handed to the kids and along the route signs are held high saying “thank you” to veterans while the kids wave those flags and cheer. This is a certainly a living history lesson for all ages that no books can provide.

Parade entries stage at 3rd and Railroad Avenue on the southwest corner of the intersections from the Vet Club. The parade begins at 11:11 a.m. at the corner of 4th Street and Railroad Avenue and ends at 12-Noon at the Dwayne Webster Veterans Memorial Park (DWVM) located at Grant and Eisenhower (aka Hwy 34).

The special program at the DWVM Park at noon following the parade will feature presentation of the colors, guest speaker, live band music by the local high school band, a white dove release, Taps and more.

The public is invited to return to the Veterans Club at 1 p.m. where lunch will be served by the Sons of the American Legion. Displays including historical artifacts, military memorabilia, and information about benefits and other assistance for Veterans and families will still be available.

The public will be invited to a program at the Hospice Veterans Memorial Garden at 305 Carpenter Rd., Fort Collins, from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Various veteran organizations will be present for this dedication to those who are there in their final hours.

For more information, please email Tony DuMosch at tdumosch@yahoo.com. Although Tony has served as Loveland’s Veterans Day Organizer, American Legion Post 15, for several years, he is taking a break this year, and serving as a “technical advisor” when needed.

For the third year straight Loveland has been recognized by the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington D.C. as an official regional Veterans Day site and Colorado’s official site for the observance of Veterans Day. Loveland is one of the few cities in the nation to received this recognition thanks to the many local veterans and volunteers who make this happen. These sites serve as models for other communities’ observance of Veteran’s Day.

Veteran’s Day is a national “thank you” to the men and women who have served all of us in uniform. These regional observances enable the federal government to bring resources closer to more veterans. This year’s special tribute is to the Female Veterans of the past and present.

World War I officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed June 28, 1919, but fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day. The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades, public meetings, and a brief suspension of business beginning at 11 a.m.

A congressional Act approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November a legal holiday known as Armistice Day. In 1954, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting in its place the word “Veterans” and November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

The Uniform Holiday Bill enacted in 1968 was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by celebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day and Columbus Day. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates causing much confusion. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of Veterans Day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of citizens, so in 1975 President Gerald R. Ford signed a law which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978.

The 2011 Loveland Veterans Day celebration begins from 4 a.m. to 6 a.m., with the Loveland Bell Ringers ringing the sound of freedom throughout the city. Tony DuMosch, American Legion Post 15 said, “Loveland still rings the bells of freedom just as they had done on Nov. 11, 1918. It was then that bells of all kinds rang around the world to signify the ‘war to end all wars’ was over.” (At that time no one could imagine any war being greater.)

DuMosch continued, “The bells range in sizes from large church and school bells to small farm dinner bells. Each truck with a bell will have its own area of the city and ring the bells as they go through neighborhood streets.

By 6 a.m. the bells have stopped with only a few still ringing as they come through the Loveland Burial Park on Hwy 287 in honor of those who have passed. Over 50 American flags on 18-foot poles are raised by local Boy Scouts, veterans, and volunteers. Each of these casket flags were donated by a family member who wanted their loved one remembered every Veterans Day and Memorial Day.

From 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. breakfast will also be served at the Associated Vets Club at 305 Cleveland Ave. The public is invited for meals for an admission charge. The funds go to the Sons of the American Legion.

Veterans in full uniform from past and present eat free. To see uniforms and veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Cold War Era and even today’s modern wars on terror is a sight to behold, and brings a sense of history to life that no history books can do.

The Vets Club will be open (free) to the public to view table displays, but closes at 10:30 for the parade which begins at 11:11 a.m. (It was on the 11th month of the 11th day of the 11 hour and the 11th minute when the armistice was signed in 1918.)

The local Elks Club busses in hundreds of fifth graders from local schools to line the parade route along with hundreds of other spectators. Flags are handed to the kids and along the route signs are held high saying “thank you” to veterans while the kids wave those flags and cheer. This is a certainly a living history lesson for all ages that no books can provide.

Parade entries stage at 3rd and Railroad Avenue on the southwest corner of the intersections from the Vet Club. The parade begins at 11:11 a.m. at the corner of 4th Street and Railroad Avenue and ends at 12-Noon at the Dwayne Webster Veterans Memorial Park (DWVM) located at Grant and Eisenhower (aka Hwy 34).

The special program at the DWVM Park at noon following the parade will feature presentation of the colors, guest speaker, live band music by the local high school band, a white dove release, Taps and more.

The public is invited to return to the Veterans Club at 1 p.m. where lunch will be served by the Sons of the American Legion. Displays including historical artifacts, military memorabilia, and information about benefits and other assistance for Veterans and families will still be available.

The public will be invited to a program at the Hospice Veterans Memorial Garden at 305 Carpenter Rd., Fort Collins, from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Various veteran organizations will be present for this dedication to those who are there in their final hours.

For more information, please email Tony DuMosch at tdumosch@yahoo.com. Although Tony has served as Loveland’s Veterans Day Organizer, American Legion Post 15, for several years, he is taking a break this year, and serving as a “technical advisor” when needed.

For the third year straight Loveland has been recognized by the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington D.C. as an official regional Veterans Day site and Colorado’s official site for the observance of Veterans Day. Loveland is one of the few cities in the nation to received this recognition thanks to the many local veterans and volunteers who make this happen. These sites serve as models for other communities’ observance of Veteran’s Day.

Veteran’s Day is a national “thank you” to the men and women who have served all of us in uniform. These regional observances enable the federal government to bring resources closer to more veterans. This year’s special tribute is to the Female Veterans of the past and present.

World War I officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed June 28, 1919, but fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day. The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades, public meetings, and a brief suspension of business beginning at 11 a.m.

A congressional Act approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November a legal holiday known as Armistice Day. In 1954, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting in its place the word “Veterans” and November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

The Uniform Holiday Bill enacted in 1968 was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by celebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day and Columbus Day. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates causing much confusion. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of Veterans Day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of citizens, so in 1975 President Gerald R. Ford signed a law which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978.

The 2011 Loveland Veterans Day celebration begins from 4 a.m. to 6 a.m., with the Loveland Bell Ringers ringing the sound of freedom throughout the city. Tony DuMosch, American Legion Post 15 said, “Loveland still rings the bells of freedom just as they had done on Nov. 11, 1918. It was then that bells of all kinds rang around the world to signify the ‘war to end all wars’ was over.” (At that time no one could imagine any war being greater.)

DuMosch continued, “The bells range in sizes from large church and school bells to small farm dinner bells. Each truck with a bell will have its own area of the city and ring the bells as they go through neighborhood streets.

By 6 a.m. the bells have stopped with only a few still ringing as they come through the Loveland Burial Park on Hwy 287 in honor of those who have passed. Over 50 American flags on 18-foot poles are raised by local Boy Scouts, veterans, and volunteers. Each of these casket flags were donated by a family member who wanted their loved one remembered every Veterans Day and Memorial Day.

From 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. breakfast will also be served at the Associated Vets Club at 305 Cleveland Ave. The public is invited for meals for an admission charge. The funds go to the Sons of the American Legion.

Veterans in full uniform from past and present eat free. To see uniforms and veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Cold War Era and even today’s modern wars on terror is a sight to behold, and brings a sense of history to life that no history books can do.

The Vets Club will be open (free) to the public to view table displays, but closes at 10:30 for the parade which begins at 11:11 a.m. (It was on the 11th month of the 11th day of the 11 hour and the 11th minute when the armistice was signed in 1918.)

The local Elks Club busses in hundreds of fifth graders from local schools to line the parade route along with hundreds of other spectators. Flags are handed to the kids and along the route signs are held high saying “thank you” to veterans while the kids wave those flags and cheer. This is a certainly a living history lesson for all ages that no books can provide.

Parade entries stage at 3rd and Railroad Avenue on the southwest corner of the intersections from the Vet Club. The parade begins at 11:11 a.m. at the corner of 4th Street and Railroad Avenue and ends at 12-Noon at the Dwayne Webster Veterans Memorial Park (DWVM) located at Grant and Eisenhower (aka Hwy 34).

The special program at the DWVM Park at noon following the parade will feature presentation of the colors, guest speaker, live band music by the local high school band, a white dove release, Taps and more.

The public is invited to return to the Veterans Club at 1 p.m. where lunch will be served by the Sons of the American Legion. Displays including historical artifacts, military memorabilia, and information about benefits and other assistance for Veterans and families will still be available.

The public will be invited to a program at the Hospice Veterans Memorial Garden at 305 Carpenter Rd., Fort Collins, from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Various veteran organizations will be present for this dedication to those who are there in their final hours.

For more information, please email Tony DuMosch at tdumosch@yahoo.com. Although Tony has served as Loveland’s Veterans Day Organizer, American Legion Post 15, for several years, he is taking a break this year, and serving as a “technical advisor” when needed.