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Loveland’s Veterans Day Celebration gets national recognition again in 2010

Ella Marie Hayes
Saratoga, Wyo.
Photos courtesy of Tony DuMosch, Loveland VeteransThis World War I truck is followed by a Korean War Duce 1/2 during a Loveland Veterans Day parade.

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Loveland, Colo., again received a letter of recognition from the Department of Veterans Affairs, designating the city as a Regional Site for the observance of Veterans Day 2010. Loveland is one of 41 cities in the nation to receive this recognition thanks to Tony DuMosch, Veterans Day Chairman and the many Veterans and Volunteers who make this happen every year. These sites serve as models for other communities’ observance of Veterans Day.

Veterans Day is a national “thank you” to the men and women who have served all of us in uniform. These regional observances enable the federal government to bring resources closer to more veterans. This year will include a special tribute to Korean War era Veterans to commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the start of the Korean War in 1950 (also called the “Forgotten War”).

The Korean War tribute is especially meaningful to us since Van was called to active duty in October 1950 while enrolled at CSU in Fort Collins (Aggies then). He was called to the phone in the middle of an exam and ordered to report immediately to Ft. Lewis in Washington, and sacrifice his credits for that quarter.

Van recalls when their troop ship reached Korea around Christmas time, the troops were loaded on box cars and traveled several days in the bitter cold, then housed in tents at their destination. Sleeping bags were not designed for the cold so the service men wrapped their ponchos around the bags during the night, then due to condensation had to dry their sleeping bags during the day.

Special parade entries focusing on the Korean War will include the Colorado Korean War Veterans Association Queen City Chapter 195. Other highlights are the Northern Colorado Fife and Drum Corps.; Cadets from the Thompson Valley JROTC; the Thompson Valley H.S. Band; US Army 5th Battalion 19th Special Forces Group; 40 soldiers from the 409th Engineer Company; a WWI Vintage Army Truck, and much more.

Loveland’s Veterans Day organizer Tony DuMosch, American Legion Post 15 said, “Loveland is one of two communities in Colorado who still ring the bells of freedom just as they had done on Nov. 11, 1918. It was then that bells of all kinds rang around the world to signify the ‘war that was to end all wars’ was over.” (At that time no one could imagine any war being greater.)

DuMosch continued, “I like to think of the ringing of the bells as a sign of hope and peace, but we also ring them in honor of the veterans. The bells range in sizes from large church and school bells to the small farm dinner bells. Each truck with a bell will have its own area of the city and ring the bells as they go through neighborhood streets from 4 to 6 a.m.

“By 6 a.m. the bells have stopped, with only a few still ringing as they come through the Loveland Burial Park in honor of those who have passed. Over 50 American flags are raised by the local Boy Scouts, veterans, and volunteers. Each of these flags were donated by a family member who wanted their loved one remembered every Veterans Day and Memorial Day.

“In downtown Loveland, Sons of the American Legion also post both the American and state colors down the main streets. Again, history is awakened to those who take the time to reflect.”

“By 4 a.m., at the Associated Vets Club at 305 Cleveland Ave., the ladies will already be busy cooking breakfast that starts at 6 a.m. and continues till 9 a.m. ($6/plate). Military in complete uniform from past and present eat free.”

“To see uniforms and veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Cold war era, and even today’s modern wars on terror is a sight to behold. The veterans bring a true sense of history to life that no history books can do.”

The Vets Club will be open for the public to view the table displays that tell the military history of local veterans and other information including Operation Military Kids, American Legion, US Army, US Navy, Freedom Car, and more. The display is closed at 10:30 a.m. for the parade which begins at 11:11 a.m. (It was on the 11th month of the 11th day of the 11th hour and the 11th minute when the armistice was signed in 1918.)

The parade stages outside the Veterans club that is the home of the American Legion, VFW, and meeting place for the Marine Corps League. The parade begins along the route from downtown Loveland, up Garfield Avenue then west a block to Dwayne Webster Veterans Park at the corner of Grant and West Eisenhower.

The Elks Club of Loveland buses in over 500 fifth-graders from local schools to line the parade route along with 100s of other spectators. Flags are handed to the kids and along the route signs are held high saying “Thank you” to veterans while the kids wave those flags and cheer.

Although the parade will end at Dwayne Webster Veterans Park, the floats and historic vehicles will be parked for another chance to view them. The “Path of Freedom” made of bricks inscribed with names of friends and family leads the way to the Veteran Memorial.

The special program at the park at Noon following the parade will feature guest speaker, Major Diggs Brown US National Guard, who will take time to reflect during the ceremony. The ceremony will include a replica cannon from the Colonial Army of 1776, and will end with a 21-gun salute and the bugle sounding taps as doves begin to fly. The familiar service melody for each branch will be played by the local high school band while the members of that branch stand at attention.

The public is invited to return to the Veterans Club at 1 p.m. where lunch will be served by Squadron 15, Sons of American Legion. ($3/plate). Displays including military memorabilia and information about benefits and other assistance for Veterans and families will be made available. Entertainment including DJ music, dancing, and camaraderie will continue well beyond a 12-hour day for these veterans. There will be free ice cream for kids.

For more information, please email Tony DuMosch, Loveland Veterans Day Event Chairman at tdumosch@yahoo.com or call him at (970) 290-7411.

Loveland, Colo., again received a letter of recognition from the Department of Veterans Affairs, designating the city as a Regional Site for the observance of Veterans Day 2010. Loveland is one of 41 cities in the nation to receive this recognition thanks to Tony DuMosch, Veterans Day Chairman and the many Veterans and Volunteers who make this happen every year. These sites serve as models for other communities’ observance of Veterans Day.

Veterans Day is a national “thank you” to the men and women who have served all of us in uniform. These regional observances enable the federal government to bring resources closer to more veterans. This year will include a special tribute to Korean War era Veterans to commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the start of the Korean War in 1950 (also called the “Forgotten War”).

The Korean War tribute is especially meaningful to us since Van was called to active duty in October 1950 while enrolled at CSU in Fort Collins (Aggies then). He was called to the phone in the middle of an exam and ordered to report immediately to Ft. Lewis in Washington, and sacrifice his credits for that quarter.

Van recalls when their troop ship reached Korea around Christmas time, the troops were loaded on box cars and traveled several days in the bitter cold, then housed in tents at their destination. Sleeping bags were not designed for the cold so the service men wrapped their ponchos around the bags during the night, then due to condensation had to dry their sleeping bags during the day.

Special parade entries focusing on the Korean War will include the Colorado Korean War Veterans Association Queen City Chapter 195. Other highlights are the Northern Colorado Fife and Drum Corps.; Cadets from the Thompson Valley JROTC; the Thompson Valley H.S. Band; US Army 5th Battalion 19th Special Forces Group; 40 soldiers from the 409th Engineer Company; a WWI Vintage Army Truck, and much more.

Loveland’s Veterans Day organizer Tony DuMosch, American Legion Post 15 said, “Loveland is one of two communities in Colorado who still ring the bells of freedom just as they had done on Nov. 11, 1918. It was then that bells of all kinds rang around the world to signify the ‘war that was to end all wars’ was over.” (At that time no one could imagine any war being greater.)

DuMosch continued, “I like to think of the ringing of the bells as a sign of hope and peace, but we also ring them in honor of the veterans. The bells range in sizes from large church and school bells to the small farm dinner bells. Each truck with a bell will have its own area of the city and ring the bells as they go through neighborhood streets from 4 to 6 a.m.

“By 6 a.m. the bells have stopped, with only a few still ringing as they come through the Loveland Burial Park in honor of those who have passed. Over 50 American flags are raised by the local Boy Scouts, veterans, and volunteers. Each of these flags were donated by a family member who wanted their loved one remembered every Veterans Day and Memorial Day.

“In downtown Loveland, Sons of the American Legion also post both the American and state colors down the main streets. Again, history is awakened to those who take the time to reflect.”

“By 4 a.m., at the Associated Vets Club at 305 Cleveland Ave., the ladies will already be busy cooking breakfast that starts at 6 a.m. and continues till 9 a.m. ($6/plate). Military in complete uniform from past and present eat free.”

“To see uniforms and veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Cold war era, and even today’s modern wars on terror is a sight to behold. The veterans bring a true sense of history to life that no history books can do.”

The Vets Club will be open for the public to view the table displays that tell the military history of local veterans and other information including Operation Military Kids, American Legion, US Army, US Navy, Freedom Car, and more. The display is closed at 10:30 a.m. for the parade which begins at 11:11 a.m. (It was on the 11th month of the 11th day of the 11th hour and the 11th minute when the armistice was signed in 1918.)

The parade stages outside the Veterans club that is the home of the American Legion, VFW, and meeting place for the Marine Corps League. The parade begins along the route from downtown Loveland, up Garfield Avenue then west a block to Dwayne Webster Veterans Park at the corner of Grant and West Eisenhower.

The Elks Club of Loveland buses in over 500 fifth-graders from local schools to line the parade route along with 100s of other spectators. Flags are handed to the kids and along the route signs are held high saying “Thank you” to veterans while the kids wave those flags and cheer.

Although the parade will end at Dwayne Webster Veterans Park, the floats and historic vehicles will be parked for another chance to view them. The “Path of Freedom” made of bricks inscribed with names of friends and family leads the way to the Veteran Memorial.

The special program at the park at Noon following the parade will feature guest speaker, Major Diggs Brown US National Guard, who will take time to reflect during the ceremony. The ceremony will include a replica cannon from the Colonial Army of 1776, and will end with a 21-gun salute and the bugle sounding taps as doves begin to fly. The familiar service melody for each branch will be played by the local high school band while the members of that branch stand at attention.

The public is invited to return to the Veterans Club at 1 p.m. where lunch will be served by Squadron 15, Sons of American Legion. ($3/plate). Displays including military memorabilia and information about benefits and other assistance for Veterans and families will be made available. Entertainment including DJ music, dancing, and camaraderie will continue well beyond a 12-hour day for these veterans. There will be free ice cream for kids.

For more information, please email Tony DuMosch, Loveland Veterans Day Event Chairman at tdumosch@yahoo.com or call him at (970) 290-7411.

Loveland, Colo., again received a letter of recognition from the Department of Veterans Affairs, designating the city as a Regional Site for the observance of Veterans Day 2010. Loveland is one of 41 cities in the nation to receive this recognition thanks to Tony DuMosch, Veterans Day Chairman and the many Veterans and Volunteers who make this happen every year. These sites serve as models for other communities’ observance of Veterans Day.

Veterans Day is a national “thank you” to the men and women who have served all of us in uniform. These regional observances enable the federal government to bring resources closer to more veterans. This year will include a special tribute to Korean War era Veterans to commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the start of the Korean War in 1950 (also called the “Forgotten War”).

The Korean War tribute is especially meaningful to us since Van was called to active duty in October 1950 while enrolled at CSU in Fort Collins (Aggies then). He was called to the phone in the middle of an exam and ordered to report immediately to Ft. Lewis in Washington, and sacrifice his credits for that quarter.

Van recalls when their troop ship reached Korea around Christmas time, the troops were loaded on box cars and traveled several days in the bitter cold, then housed in tents at their destination. Sleeping bags were not designed for the cold so the service men wrapped their ponchos around the bags during the night, then due to condensation had to dry their sleeping bags during the day.

Special parade entries focusing on the Korean War will include the Colorado Korean War Veterans Association Queen City Chapter 195. Other highlights are the Northern Colorado Fife and Drum Corps.; Cadets from the Thompson Valley JROTC; the Thompson Valley H.S. Band; US Army 5th Battalion 19th Special Forces Group; 40 soldiers from the 409th Engineer Company; a WWI Vintage Army Truck, and much more.

Loveland’s Veterans Day organizer Tony DuMosch, American Legion Post 15 said, “Loveland is one of two communities in Colorado who still ring the bells of freedom just as they had done on Nov. 11, 1918. It was then that bells of all kinds rang around the world to signify the ‘war that was to end all wars’ was over.” (At that time no one could imagine any war being greater.)

DuMosch continued, “I like to think of the ringing of the bells as a sign of hope and peace, but we also ring them in honor of the veterans. The bells range in sizes from large church and school bells to the small farm dinner bells. Each truck with a bell will have its own area of the city and ring the bells as they go through neighborhood streets from 4 to 6 a.m.

“By 6 a.m. the bells have stopped, with only a few still ringing as they come through the Loveland Burial Park in honor of those who have passed. Over 50 American flags are raised by the local Boy Scouts, veterans, and volunteers. Each of these flags were donated by a family member who wanted their loved one remembered every Veterans Day and Memorial Day.

“In downtown Loveland, Sons of the American Legion also post both the American and state colors down the main streets. Again, history is awakened to those who take the time to reflect.”

“By 4 a.m., at the Associated Vets Club at 305 Cleveland Ave., the ladies will already be busy cooking breakfast that starts at 6 a.m. and continues till 9 a.m. ($6/plate). Military in complete uniform from past and present eat free.”

“To see uniforms and veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Cold war era, and even today’s modern wars on terror is a sight to behold. The veterans bring a true sense of history to life that no history books can do.”

The Vets Club will be open for the public to view the table displays that tell the military history of local veterans and other information including Operation Military Kids, American Legion, US Army, US Navy, Freedom Car, and more. The display is closed at 10:30 a.m. for the parade which begins at 11:11 a.m. (It was on the 11th month of the 11th day of the 11th hour and the 11th minute when the armistice was signed in 1918.)

The parade stages outside the Veterans club that is the home of the American Legion, VFW, and meeting place for the Marine Corps League. The parade begins along the route from downtown Loveland, up Garfield Avenue then west a block to Dwayne Webster Veterans Park at the corner of Grant and West Eisenhower.

The Elks Club of Loveland buses in over 500 fifth-graders from local schools to line the parade route along with 100s of other spectators. Flags are handed to the kids and along the route signs are held high saying “Thank you” to veterans while the kids wave those flags and cheer.

Although the parade will end at Dwayne Webster Veterans Park, the floats and historic vehicles will be parked for another chance to view them. The “Path of Freedom” made of bricks inscribed with names of friends and family leads the way to the Veteran Memorial.

The special program at the park at Noon following the parade will feature guest speaker, Major Diggs Brown US National Guard, who will take time to reflect during the ceremony. The ceremony will include a replica cannon from the Colonial Army of 1776, and will end with a 21-gun salute and the bugle sounding taps as doves begin to fly. The familiar service melody for each branch will be played by the local high school band while the members of that branch stand at attention.

The public is invited to return to the Veterans Club at 1 p.m. where lunch will be served by Squadron 15, Sons of American Legion. ($3/plate). Displays including military memorabilia and information about benefits and other assistance for Veterans and families will be made available. Entertainment including DJ music, dancing, and camaraderie will continue well beyond a 12-hour day for these veterans. There will be free ice cream for kids.

For more information, please email Tony DuMosch, Loveland Veterans Day Event Chairman at tdumosch@yahoo.com or call him at (970) 290-7411.


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