McCook Farm and Ranch Expo’s new events were a big hit | TheFencePost.com

McCook Farm and Ranch Expo’s new events were a big hit

Robyn Scherer, M.Agr.
Staff Reporter

The McCook FFA chapter stands in front of their 1983 Ford Ranger, which sold for $1,400. All of the proceeds benefitted McCook FFA.

The fourth annual McCook Farm and Ranch Expo brought an exciting horse and item auction, as well as hundreds of vendors who showcased new products and services. The show was held on November 16 and 17 at the Red Willow County Fairgrounds in McCook, Neb.

The show kicked off on Wednesday the 16th with a free producer’s breakfast, where 300 people were served. “Even though we had snow, we still had a lot of people come out for the breakfast and show,” said Darren Dale, manager of the show.

Nearly 12,000 people attended the event over the two days, from several different states including Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado and Wyoming.

The show featured a wide variety of exhibitors, including farm and ranch equipment, seed and chemicals, agricultural services, irrigation manufacturers, financial providers, commodity organizations, colleges, governmental services, home services, furniture and art galleries.

Mid-day on Wednesday, speakers from the University of Nebraska, Robert Tigner and Brian Stauch, presented information on commodity price outlook, price cost and feed calculators.

Stauch offered four tips to producers on managing feed costs. The first is that it is easier to put condition on a cow before she calves. “Once she calves, her maintenance requirements goes up and it will be harder to maintain her weight,” said Stauch.

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Secondly, he talked about the advantage that Nebraska producers have because of the availability of crop residue. The third tip he talked about was the importance of having feed tested. “It is well worth the $25-50 to have your forage tested to know the nutritional value,” he said.

The last tip that he offered was to feed by-products to cattle if possible, to reduce costs. One product that is readily available in many parts of Nebraska is distillers grains.

Robert Tigner, also from UNL, then talked about how commodity prices will change going into the future. “Prices will likely stay high, and we will see some acres, especially in the midwest, shift from soybeans to corn,” said Tigner.

Later that evening, the working horse auction was held. This was the first year for the event, and it was sponsored by Z Tags. The sale offered nine horses that ranged in age from 5-15. Lot number one, SMI Hickory Country, an 8-year-old gelding, was consigned by Jeff Johnston of Thedford, Neb., and sold for $1,500.

Lot two, Zips Dakota Pine, a 15-year-old gelding consigned by Danny Elwood of Oberlin, Kan., sold for $2,000. Lot three, Smoke a Lil Peppy, a 7-year-old mare was consigned by Justen Nokes of Hastings, Neb., and sold for $3,500.

Lot four, Oaks Bars Leo Mac, a 12-year-old gelding consigned by Quirt and Amber Hunt of North Platte, Neb., brought the most money, selling for $6,000. The horse, nicknamed Flit, lost his vision in his left eye as a young horse, but still showed tremendous skill as a ranch horse.

“He’s a great horse,” said Quirt Hunt, the trainer who consigned him. Hunt is not stranger to training horses.

“I have been riding since I was a young child, and I took an interest in starting and riding horses. I have been taking in outside horses since I was 15 or 16, so for the last 20 years or so,” Hunt said. Hunt is also a professional bullfighter, and has been doing so for the last 15 years.

The next lot in the sale, lot five, was a 7-year-old gelding named SMI Hickory Luck, and was consigned by Jeff Johnston of Thedford, Neb. He brought $1,050. Lot six, a 5-year-old gelding named Scout, brought $2,400 and was consigned by Garrett Nokes of McCook, Neb.

Lot seven, a 9-year-old gelding named Jig, was consigned by Casey Donohue of Benkelman, Neb., and sold for $2,450. Lot eight, CP Arizona Ranger, an 8-year-old gelding consigned by Danny Elwood of Oberlin, Kan., brought $3,000. The final horse of the evening, Flick Bar Baker, a 7-year old gelding consigned by Justen Nokes of Hastings, Neb., brought $1,900.

“We gave out over 1,000 bidder numbers for the horse sale, for only nine horses. It helped that they were guaranteed sound and ready to go. It was a great success. We will probably keep about the same number of horses in the sale for next year. Our number one goal is being a farm show, and the horse sale is a nice addition to it,” Dale said.

After the horse sale, area FFA chapters auctioned off items to raise money. McCook FFA was offered a 1983 Ford Ranger, which sold for $1,400. Dundy County Stratton FFA auctioned a saddle rack for $120, and Cheylin FFA sold a 10-foot tilt bed utility trailer for $1,450. Southwest Public High School FFA offered a receiver hitch luggage rack, which brought $95.

“These are the kids that are our future leaders. The money raised helps to keep them in agriculture. It’s great to raise money for them because it goes for a great cause and continues to support agriculture for today and years to come in this area.”

On Thursday, Tim Shaver, the Nutrient Management Specialist at the UNL West Central Research and Extension Center in North Platte, Neb., gave a presentation nutrition management.

Corporate sponsors for the expo include Plains Equipment Group formally known as Southwest Implement, Hometown Family Radio and The American Hat Company.

Throughout both days, Scott Daily, professional horse trainer, gave demonstrations on low stress training techniques. Daily has been training horses for 15 years, and is from Oklahoma.

Overall, the show went very well. Dale said, “The show team and vendors alike were extremely pleased with the attendance and the turn out. The buying power and buying volume in McCook is as good as any show in the United States. It is very well supported by local farmers and ranchers.”

The fourth annual McCook Farm and Ranch Expo brought an exciting horse and item auction, as well as hundreds of vendors who showcased new products and services. The show was held on November 16 and 17 at the Red Willow County Fairgrounds in McCook, Neb.

The show kicked off on Wednesday the 16th with a free producer’s breakfast, where 300 people were served. “Even though we had snow, we still had a lot of people come out for the breakfast and show,” said Darren Dale, manager of the show.

Nearly 12,000 people attended the event over the two days, from several different states including Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado and Wyoming.

The show featured a wide variety of exhibitors, including farm and ranch equipment, seed and chemicals, agricultural services, irrigation manufacturers, financial providers, commodity organizations, colleges, governmental services, home services, furniture and art galleries.

Mid-day on Wednesday, speakers from the University of Nebraska, Robert Tigner and Brian Stauch, presented information on commodity price outlook, price cost and feed calculators.

Stauch offered four tips to producers on managing feed costs. The first is that it is easier to put condition on a cow before she calves. “Once she calves, her maintenance requirements goes up and it will be harder to maintain her weight,” said Stauch.

Secondly, he talked about the advantage that Nebraska producers have because of the availability of crop residue. The third tip he talked about was the importance of having feed tested. “It is well worth the $25-50 to have your forage tested to know the nutritional value,” he said.

The last tip that he offered was to feed by-products to cattle if possible, to reduce costs. One product that is readily available in many parts of Nebraska is distillers grains.

Robert Tigner, also from UNL, then talked about how commodity prices will change going into the future. “Prices will likely stay high, and we will see some acres, especially in the midwest, shift from soybeans to corn,” said Tigner.

Later that evening, the working horse auction was held. This was the first year for the event, and it was sponsored by Z Tags. The sale offered nine horses that ranged in age from 5-15. Lot number one, SMI Hickory Country, an 8-year-old gelding, was consigned by Jeff Johnston of Thedford, Neb., and sold for $1,500.

Lot two, Zips Dakota Pine, a 15-year-old gelding consigned by Danny Elwood of Oberlin, Kan., sold for $2,000. Lot three, Smoke a Lil Peppy, a 7-year-old mare was consigned by Justen Nokes of Hastings, Neb., and sold for $3,500.

Lot four, Oaks Bars Leo Mac, a 12-year-old gelding consigned by Quirt and Amber Hunt of North Platte, Neb., brought the most money, selling for $6,000. The horse, nicknamed Flit, lost his vision in his left eye as a young horse, but still showed tremendous skill as a ranch horse.

“He’s a great horse,” said Quirt Hunt, the trainer who consigned him. Hunt is not stranger to training horses.

“I have been riding since I was a young child, and I took an interest in starting and riding horses. I have been taking in outside horses since I was 15 or 16, so for the last 20 years or so,” Hunt said. Hunt is also a professional bullfighter, and has been doing so for the last 15 years.

The next lot in the sale, lot five, was a 7-year-old gelding named SMI Hickory Luck, and was consigned by Jeff Johnston of Thedford, Neb. He brought $1,050. Lot six, a 5-year-old gelding named Scout, brought $2,400 and was consigned by Garrett Nokes of McCook, Neb.

Lot seven, a 9-year-old gelding named Jig, was consigned by Casey Donohue of Benkelman, Neb., and sold for $2,450. Lot eight, CP Arizona Ranger, an 8-year-old gelding consigned by Danny Elwood of Oberlin, Kan., brought $3,000. The final horse of the evening, Flick Bar Baker, a 7-year old gelding consigned by Justen Nokes of Hastings, Neb., brought $1,900.

“We gave out over 1,000 bidder numbers for the horse sale, for only nine horses. It helped that they were guaranteed sound and ready to go. It was a great success. We will probably keep about the same number of horses in the sale for next year. Our number one goal is being a farm show, and the horse sale is a nice addition to it,” Dale said.

After the horse sale, area FFA chapters auctioned off items to raise money. McCook FFA was offered a 1983 Ford Ranger, which sold for $1,400. Dundy County Stratton FFA auctioned a saddle rack for $120, and Cheylin FFA sold a 10-foot tilt bed utility trailer for $1,450. Southwest Public High School FFA offered a receiver hitch luggage rack, which brought $95.

“These are the kids that are our future leaders. The money raised helps to keep them in agriculture. It’s great to raise money for them because it goes for a great cause and continues to support agriculture for today and years to come in this area.”

On Thursday, Tim Shaver, the Nutrient Management Specialist at the UNL West Central Research and Extension Center in North Platte, Neb., gave a presentation nutrition management.

Corporate sponsors for the expo include Plains Equipment Group formally known as Southwest Implement, Hometown Family Radio and The American Hat Company.

Throughout both days, Scott Daily, professional horse trainer, gave demonstrations on low stress training techniques. Daily has been training horses for 15 years, and is from Oklahoma.

Overall, the show went very well. Dale said, “The show team and vendors alike were extremely pleased with the attendance and the turn out. The buying power and buying volume in McCook is as good as any show in the United States. It is very well supported by local farmers and ranchers.”