Nebraskans take Adventure to Tanzania | TheFencePost.com

Nebraskans take Adventure to Tanzania

Barbara Ann Dush
Fullerton, Neb.

Visiting Tanzania can offer an adventure “almost hard to comprehend,” said Mark Scott after traveling there last December.

Mark and his wife Becky went to Africa for two weeks to visit their daughter, Kristi Scott, who has been there with the Peace Corps for 21 months.

Following the 12-hour flight from Chicago to Turkey on their way to Tanzania, the Scotts took a tour of Istanbul. There they discovered the high cost of true Turkish rugs. “The rugs are made by hand-tying knots, one little knot at a time,” Becky explained. “Silk carpets are the most expensive. A big living room rug might have taken three years to make and would cost $30,000. They showed us that the way you can tell a real Turkish rug is if you look at one side of it and walk around and look at the other side and it will look a different color.”

The Scotts then boarded a plane for an eight-hour flight to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, stopping in Kenya for additional passengers. “The funny thing about stopping in Kenya was that they disinfected the plane while we were in it,” Mark noted.

They arrived at Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, around 4 a.m. Mark and Becky, along with their three other children and two of their children’s friends, crowded into a Land Rover with Kristi, a driver and two of the driver’s friends.

“Before we reached our first destination, the clutch needed adjusting, the tires needed air, we ran out of diesel and the local gas station was out of diesel for the day. But when vehicles break down in Tanzania, it’s no big deal to them. They usually know someone in the next village who can bring fuel or tools on their bike or motorcycle,” Mark said.

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“Things don’t always go as planned. Tanzanians seem to live day to day without deadlines or schedules, and they’re okay with it. They’re happy, very friendly, we never felt threatened and they were very hospitable.

“Kristi had advised us that when you plan to travel in Tanzania, you make one day just your travel day. I was thinking if it only takes three hours to get to somewhere why can’t we plan something else for that day, too. Well, we found out why … it was our first taste of typical Tanzania.”

The crowded roads of villagers selling wares and the overflowing buses became a common sight for the Scotts, who were used to the rural life of small-town Belgrade, Neb. There were pedestrians and bicyclists everywhere, and motorcycles weaving among the traffic. “I was so impressed by how many people are there,” Mark said. “They fill everything to the max. I saw a guy hauling cattle with two men riding in the back, sitting on crossbars above the cattle.”

And with Africa’s seasons opposite Nebraska’s, tourists have to quickly adjust to the 90 degree heat and 90 percent humidity.

Visiting Tanzania can offer an adventure “almost hard to comprehend,” said Mark Scott after traveling there last December.

Mark and his wife Becky went to Africa for two weeks to visit their daughter, Kristi Scott, who has been there with the Peace Corps for 21 months.

Following the 12-hour flight from Chicago to Turkey on their way to Tanzania, the Scotts took a tour of Istanbul. There they discovered the high cost of true Turkish rugs. “The rugs are made by hand-tying knots, one little knot at a time,” Becky explained. “Silk carpets are the most expensive. A big living room rug might have taken three years to make and would cost $30,000. They showed us that the way you can tell a real Turkish rug is if you look at one side of it and walk around and look at the other side and it will look a different color.”

The Scotts then boarded a plane for an eight-hour flight to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, stopping in Kenya for additional passengers. “The funny thing about stopping in Kenya was that they disinfected the plane while we were in it,” Mark noted.

They arrived at Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, around 4 a.m. Mark and Becky, along with their three other children and two of their children’s friends, crowded into a Land Rover with Kristi, a driver and two of the driver’s friends.

“Before we reached our first destination, the clutch needed adjusting, the tires needed air, we ran out of diesel and the local gas station was out of diesel for the day. But when vehicles break down in Tanzania, it’s no big deal to them. They usually know someone in the next village who can bring fuel or tools on their bike or motorcycle,” Mark said.

“Things don’t always go as planned. Tanzanians seem to live day to day without deadlines or schedules, and they’re okay with it. They’re happy, very friendly, we never felt threatened and they were very hospitable.

“Kristi had advised us that when you plan to travel in Tanzania, you make one day just your travel day. I was thinking if it only takes three hours to get to somewhere why can’t we plan something else for that day, too. Well, we found out why … it was our first taste of typical Tanzania.”

The crowded roads of villagers selling wares and the overflowing buses became a common sight for the Scotts, who were used to the rural life of small-town Belgrade, Neb. There were pedestrians and bicyclists everywhere, and motorcycles weaving among the traffic. “I was so impressed by how many people are there,” Mark said. “They fill everything to the max. I saw a guy hauling cattle with two men riding in the back, sitting on crossbars above the cattle.”

And with Africa’s seasons opposite Nebraska’s, tourists have to quickly adjust to the 90 degree heat and 90 percent humidity.

Visiting Tanzania can offer an adventure “almost hard to comprehend,” said Mark Scott after traveling there last December.

Mark and his wife Becky went to Africa for two weeks to visit their daughter, Kristi Scott, who has been there with the Peace Corps for 21 months.

Following the 12-hour flight from Chicago to Turkey on their way to Tanzania, the Scotts took a tour of Istanbul. There they discovered the high cost of true Turkish rugs. “The rugs are made by hand-tying knots, one little knot at a time,” Becky explained. “Silk carpets are the most expensive. A big living room rug might have taken three years to make and would cost $30,000. They showed us that the way you can tell a real Turkish rug is if you look at one side of it and walk around and look at the other side and it will look a different color.”

The Scotts then boarded a plane for an eight-hour flight to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, stopping in Kenya for additional passengers. “The funny thing about stopping in Kenya was that they disinfected the plane while we were in it,” Mark noted.

They arrived at Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, around 4 a.m. Mark and Becky, along with their three other children and two of their children’s friends, crowded into a Land Rover with Kristi, a driver and two of the driver’s friends.

“Before we reached our first destination, the clutch needed adjusting, the tires needed air, we ran out of diesel and the local gas station was out of diesel for the day. But when vehicles break down in Tanzania, it’s no big deal to them. They usually know someone in the next village who can bring fuel or tools on their bike or motorcycle,” Mark said.

“Things don’t always go as planned. Tanzanians seem to live day to day without deadlines or schedules, and they’re okay with it. They’re happy, very friendly, we never felt threatened and they were very hospitable.

“Kristi had advised us that when you plan to travel in Tanzania, you make one day just your travel day. I was thinking if it only takes three hours to get to somewhere why can’t we plan something else for that day, too. Well, we found out why … it was our first taste of typical Tanzania.”

The crowded roads of villagers selling wares and the overflowing buses became a common sight for the Scotts, who were used to the rural life of small-town Belgrade, Neb. There were pedestrians and bicyclists everywhere, and motorcycles weaving among the traffic. “I was so impressed by how many people are there,” Mark said. “They fill everything to the max. I saw a guy hauling cattle with two men riding in the back, sitting on crossbars above the cattle.”

And with Africa’s seasons opposite Nebraska’s, tourists have to quickly adjust to the 90 degree heat and 90 percent humidity.

Visiting Tanzania can offer an adventure “almost hard to comprehend,” said Mark Scott after traveling there last December.

Mark and his wife Becky went to Africa for two weeks to visit their daughter, Kristi Scott, who has been there with the Peace Corps for 21 months.

Following the 12-hour flight from Chicago to Turkey on their way to Tanzania, the Scotts took a tour of Istanbul. There they discovered the high cost of true Turkish rugs. “The rugs are made by hand-tying knots, one little knot at a time,” Becky explained. “Silk carpets are the most expensive. A big living room rug might have taken three years to make and would cost $30,000. They showed us that the way you can tell a real Turkish rug is if you look at one side of it and walk around and look at the other side and it will look a different color.”

The Scotts then boarded a plane for an eight-hour flight to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, stopping in Kenya for additional passengers. “The funny thing about stopping in Kenya was that they disinfected the plane while we were in it,” Mark noted.

They arrived at Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, around 4 a.m. Mark and Becky, along with their three other children and two of their children’s friends, crowded into a Land Rover with Kristi, a driver and two of the driver’s friends.

“Before we reached our first destination, the clutch needed adjusting, the tires needed air, we ran out of diesel and the local gas station was out of diesel for the day. But when vehicles break down in Tanzania, it’s no big deal to them. They usually know someone in the next village who can bring fuel or tools on their bike or motorcycle,” Mark said.

“Things don’t always go as planned. Tanzanians seem to live day to day without deadlines or schedules, and they’re okay with it. They’re happy, very friendly, we never felt threatened and they were very hospitable.

“Kristi had advised us that when you plan to travel in Tanzania, you make one day just your travel day. I was thinking if it only takes three hours to get to somewhere why can’t we plan something else for that day, too. Well, we found out why … it was our first taste of typical Tanzania.”

The crowded roads of villagers selling wares and the overflowing buses became a common sight for the Scotts, who were used to the rural life of small-town Belgrade, Neb. There were pedestrians and bicyclists everywhere, and motorcycles weaving among the traffic. “I was so impressed by how many people are there,” Mark said. “They fill everything to the max. I saw a guy hauling cattle with two men riding in the back, sitting on crossbars above the cattle.”

And with Africa’s seasons opposite Nebraska’s, tourists have to quickly adjust to the 90 degree heat and 90 percent humidity.

Visiting Tanzania can offer an adventure “almost hard to comprehend,” said Mark Scott after traveling there last December.

Mark and his wife Becky went to Africa for two weeks to visit their daughter, Kristi Scott, who has been there with the Peace Corps for 21 months.

Following the 12-hour flight from Chicago to Turkey on their way to Tanzania, the Scotts took a tour of Istanbul. There they discovered the high cost of true Turkish rugs. “The rugs are made by hand-tying knots, one little knot at a time,” Becky explained. “Silk carpets are the most expensive. A big living room rug might have taken three years to make and would cost $30,000. They showed us that the way you can tell a real Turkish rug is if you look at one side of it and walk around and look at the other side and it will look a different color.”

The Scotts then boarded a plane for an eight-hour flight to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, stopping in Kenya for additional passengers. “The funny thing about stopping in Kenya was that they disinfected the plane while we were in it,” Mark noted.

They arrived at Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, around 4 a.m. Mark and Becky, along with their three other children and two of their children’s friends, crowded into a Land Rover with Kristi, a driver and two of the driver’s friends.

“Before we reached our first destination, the clutch needed adjusting, the tires needed air, we ran out of diesel and the local gas station was out of diesel for the day. But when vehicles break down in Tanzania, it’s no big deal to them. They usually know someone in the next village who can bring fuel or tools on their bike or motorcycle,” Mark said.

“Things don’t always go as planned. Tanzanians seem to live day to day without deadlines or schedules, and they’re okay with it. They’re happy, very friendly, we never felt threatened and they were very hospitable.

“Kristi had advised us that when you plan to travel in Tanzania, you make one day just your travel day. I was thinking if it only takes three hours to get to somewhere why can’t we plan something else for that day, too. Well, we found out why … it was our first taste of typical Tanzania.”

The crowded roads of villagers selling wares and the overflowing buses became a common sight for the Scotts, who were used to the rural life of small-town Belgrade, Neb. There were pedestrians and bicyclists everywhere, and motorcycles weaving among the traffic. “I was so impressed by how many people are there,” Mark said. “They fill everything to the max. I saw a guy hauling cattle with two men riding in the back, sitting on crossbars above the cattle.”

And with Africa’s seasons opposite Nebraska’s, tourists have to quickly adjust to the 90 degree heat and 90 percent humidity.

Visiting Tanzania can offer an adventure “almost hard to comprehend,” said Mark Scott after traveling there last December.

Mark and his wife Becky went to Africa for two weeks to visit their daughter, Kristi Scott, who has been there with the Peace Corps for 21 months.

Following the 12-hour flight from Chicago to Turkey on their way to Tanzania, the Scotts took a tour of Istanbul. There they discovered the high cost of true Turkish rugs. “The rugs are made by hand-tying knots, one little knot at a time,” Becky explained. “Silk carpets are the most expensive. A big living room rug might have taken three years to make and would cost $30,000. They showed us that the way you can tell a real Turkish rug is if you look at one side of it and walk around and look at the other side and it will look a different color.”

The Scotts then boarded a plane for an eight-hour flight to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, stopping in Kenya for additional passengers. “The funny thing about stopping in Kenya was that they disinfected the plane while we were in it,” Mark noted.

They arrived at Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, around 4 a.m. Mark and Becky, along with their three other children and two of their children’s friends, crowded into a Land Rover with Kristi, a driver and two of the driver’s friends.

“Before we reached our first destination, the clutch needed adjusting, the tires needed air, we ran out of diesel and the local gas station was out of diesel for the day. But when vehicles break down in Tanzania, it’s no big deal to them. They usually know someone in the next village who can bring fuel or tools on their bike or motorcycle,” Mark said.

“Things don’t always go as planned. Tanzanians seem to live day to day without deadlines or schedules, and they’re okay with it. They’re happy, very friendly, we never felt threatened and they were very hospitable.

“Kristi had advised us that when you plan to travel in Tanzania, you make one day just your travel day. I was thinking if it only takes three hours to get to somewhere why can’t we plan something else for that day, too. Well, we found out why … it was our first taste of typical Tanzania.”

The crowded roads of villagers selling wares and the overflowing buses became a common sight for the Scotts, who were used to the rural life of small-town Belgrade, Neb. There were pedestrians and bicyclists everywhere, and motorcycles weaving among the traffic. “I was so impressed by how many people are there,” Mark said. “They fill everything to the max. I saw a guy hauling cattle with two men riding in the back, sitting on crossbars above the cattle.”

And with Africa’s seasons opposite Nebraska’s, tourists have to quickly adjust to the 90 degree heat and 90 percent humidity.

Visiting Tanzania can offer an adventure “almost hard to comprehend,” said Mark Scott after traveling there last December.

Mark and his wife Becky went to Africa for two weeks to visit their daughter, Kristi Scott, who has been there with the Peace Corps for 21 months.

Following the 12-hour flight from Chicago to Turkey on their way to Tanzania, the Scotts took a tour of Istanbul. There they discovered the high cost of true Turkish rugs. “The rugs are made by hand-tying knots, one little knot at a time,” Becky explained. “Silk carpets are the most expensive. A big living room rug might have taken three years to make and would cost $30,000. They showed us that the way you can tell a real Turkish rug is if you look at one side of it and walk around and look at the other side and it will look a different color.”

The Scotts then boarded a plane for an eight-hour flight to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, stopping in Kenya for additional passengers. “The funny thing about stopping in Kenya was that they disinfected the plane while we were in it,” Mark noted.

They arrived at Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, around 4 a.m. Mark and Becky, along with their three other children and two of their children’s friends, crowded into a Land Rover with Kristi, a driver and two of the driver’s friends.

“Before we reached our first destination, the clutch needed adjusting, the tires needed air, we ran out of diesel and the local gas station was out of diesel for the day. But when vehicles break down in Tanzania, it’s no big deal to them. They usually know someone in the next village who can bring fuel or tools on their bike or motorcycle,” Mark said.

“Things don’t always go as planned. Tanzanians seem to live day to day without deadlines or schedules, and they’re okay with it. They’re happy, very friendly, we never felt threatened and they were very hospitable.

“Kristi had advised us that when you plan to travel in Tanzania, you make one day just your travel day. I was thinking if it only takes three hours to get to somewhere why can’t we plan something else for that day, too. Well, we found out why … it was our first taste of typical Tanzania.”

The crowded roads of villagers selling wares and the overflowing buses became a common sight for the Scotts, who were used to the rural life of small-town Belgrade, Neb. There were pedestrians and bicyclists everywhere, and motorcycles weaving among the traffic. “I was so impressed by how many people are there,” Mark said. “They fill everything to the max. I saw a guy hauling cattle with two men riding in the back, sitting on crossbars above the cattle.”

And with Africa’s seasons opposite Nebraska’s, tourists have to quickly adjust to the 90 degree heat and 90 percent humidity.