New look at the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo | TheFencePost.com

New look at the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo

Tony BruguiereThe Gypsy Horse is always a fan favorite. The rider wears authentic gypsy costume during the breed demonstrations at the Mane Event at the 2010 Rocky Mountain Horse Show.

Bill Scebbi takes over the reins as executive director of the Colorado Horse Council from Brian Kitchen, who has taken a position in his home of Canada, and leads the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo in a slightly different direction.

Scebbi, who has been in Colorado since 1979, is not new to the Colorado Horse Council or the horse industry. He has been in the equine association industry for 32 years, including 10 years with the Arabian horse industry and 17 years as the executive director and chief executive officer of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association.

Bill also served on the Colorado Horse Council Board of Directors for 12 years. “I understand the background and what the Horse Association is all about,” Scebbi said, “I have some different ideas right now on where we need to lead the Horse Council in these economic times as we build the organization for the future.”

Part of the mission of the Colorado Horse Council, Scebbi said, “is to assist owners in understanding how to train and be with their horse and enjoy the horse. The Horse Council also wants to give them options for their horse in different activities, and also in the business aspect and the responsibility of horse ownership.”

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is the premier public event put on by the Colorado Horse Council and under Scebbi’s guidance, their will be some changes that will make the Horse Expo even better for the horse owner and the horse lover. This year, in addition to the fun events there has been a real emphasis placed on educating the horse lover. With 32 clinicians and speakers, there was something for every one.

In previous years the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo was a series of smaller events scattered throughout the state. Starting in 2010 the Horse Council will put all of its resources and energy into a single event held in Denver. “We are going to continue to add more horses and horse activities to the Expo so owners can bring their horse and enjoy their own horses at the Expo,” Scebbi said. “This year we started a new program called Ride with the Experts and it has been really successful.

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“We introduced the project in late January and got a really good response to it. Horse owners can actually ride with the clinicians that we bring in, in their clinic arena. The people that you see working with Cody Crow, are not people that Cody brought in, they are people that signed up to ride with Cody Crow. People can bring their own horses, ride with the clinicians, and learn a little bit more about themselves and their horses.”

Another change that went over well with everyone is a small paddock on the Trade Show floor. The first thing that a patron sees as they enter the Trade Show is a huge Shire stallion or perhaps a small Icelandic horse. There was plenty of excitement among horse lovers and especially the kids.

The ticketed Mane Event which featured horses, music, lights, demonstration acts, and all the things that horse lovers enjoy watching horses do, was introduced this year and the fans loved it.

There were demonstration events like Team Penning, an event that anyone who has a horse that is just a little bit “cowey” can compete in. There was a demonstration by the Golden Vaulters. Vaulting is a little like gymnastics on horseback and the audience was amazed by the skill and daring displayed by the all girl team from Golden, Colo.

There were a couple of demonstrations of draft horses at work which included delivery wagon work and two horse hitches pulling logs. There was a demonstration of freestyle reining performed simultaneously by three Colorado Reining Champions.

The famous Westernairs performed their intricate spiraling and crossing patterns followed up by an amazing demonstration of roman riding between flaming torches. Interwoven in all of this were breed demonstrations which included Gypsy Vanner, Icelandic Horses, Kiger Mustangs from Washington state, American Saddlebred, Arabians, and the Peruvian Paso, which is the only 100 percent naturally gaited horse in the world.

Add to this the beauty of dancing Andalusians and the incredible horsemanship exhibited by Ruben Villasenor riding his 12-year-old Polish Arabian stallion in what he called Western Dressage and it would seem to be a pretty complete night. But the Mane Event had saved the best for last. Thor is an 18-hand Shire stallion. He is a 5-year-old Orrill Speaker’s horse and he was ridden by her mother Amanda. “Thor usually goes last,” said Amanda, “because when he is in costume, he scares the other horses.”

That is easy to understand because in costume, Thor becomes an 18-hand dragon complete with horns, red wings, and a scaled tail. Thor, the dragon, was a huge hit, and capped off an exciting evening at the Mane Event.

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is going in a new direction, but it is the right direction for both the horse owner and the horse lover. It is safe to say that the reins of the Colorado Horse Council have been passed to capable hands and the equine industry in Colorado can expect big things in the future.

Bill Scebbi takes over the reins as executive director of the Colorado Horse Council from Brian Kitchen, who has taken a position in his home of Canada, and leads the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo in a slightly different direction.

Scebbi, who has been in Colorado since 1979, is not new to the Colorado Horse Council or the horse industry. He has been in the equine association industry for 32 years, including 10 years with the Arabian horse industry and 17 years as the executive director and chief executive officer of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association.

Bill also served on the Colorado Horse Council Board of Directors for 12 years. “I understand the background and what the Horse Association is all about,” Scebbi said, “I have some different ideas right now on where we need to lead the Horse Council in these economic times as we build the organization for the future.”

Part of the mission of the Colorado Horse Council, Scebbi said, “is to assist owners in understanding how to train and be with their horse and enjoy the horse. The Horse Council also wants to give them options for their horse in different activities, and also in the business aspect and the responsibility of horse ownership.”

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is the premier public event put on by the Colorado Horse Council and under Scebbi’s guidance, their will be some changes that will make the Horse Expo even better for the horse owner and the horse lover. This year, in addition to the fun events there has been a real emphasis placed on educating the horse lover. With 32 clinicians and speakers, there was something for every one.

In previous years the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo was a series of smaller events scattered throughout the state. Starting in 2010 the Horse Council will put all of its resources and energy into a single event held in Denver. “We are going to continue to add more horses and horse activities to the Expo so owners can bring their horse and enjoy their own horses at the Expo,” Scebbi said. “This year we started a new program called Ride with the Experts and it has been really successful.

“We introduced the project in late January and got a really good response to it. Horse owners can actually ride with the clinicians that we bring in, in their clinic arena. The people that you see working with Cody Crow, are not people that Cody brought in, they are people that signed up to ride with Cody Crow. People can bring their own horses, ride with the clinicians, and learn a little bit more about themselves and their horses.”

Another change that went over well with everyone is a small paddock on the Trade Show floor. The first thing that a patron sees as they enter the Trade Show is a huge Shire stallion or perhaps a small Icelandic horse. There was plenty of excitement among horse lovers and especially the kids.

The ticketed Mane Event which featured horses, music, lights, demonstration acts, and all the things that horse lovers enjoy watching horses do, was introduced this year and the fans loved it.

There were demonstration events like Team Penning, an event that anyone who has a horse that is just a little bit “cowey” can compete in. There was a demonstration by the Golden Vaulters. Vaulting is a little like gymnastics on horseback and the audience was amazed by the skill and daring displayed by the all girl team from Golden, Colo.

There were a couple of demonstrations of draft horses at work which included delivery wagon work and two horse hitches pulling logs. There was a demonstration of freestyle reining performed simultaneously by three Colorado Reining Champions.

The famous Westernairs performed their intricate spiraling and crossing patterns followed up by an amazing demonstration of roman riding between flaming torches. Interwoven in all of this were breed demonstrations which included Gypsy Vanner, Icelandic Horses, Kiger Mustangs from Washington state, American Saddlebred, Arabians, and the Peruvian Paso, which is the only 100 percent naturally gaited horse in the world.

Add to this the beauty of dancing Andalusians and the incredible horsemanship exhibited by Ruben Villasenor riding his 12-year-old Polish Arabian stallion in what he called Western Dressage and it would seem to be a pretty complete night. But the Mane Event had saved the best for last. Thor is an 18-hand Shire stallion. He is a 5-year-old Orrill Speaker’s horse and he was ridden by her mother Amanda. “Thor usually goes last,” said Amanda, “because when he is in costume, he scares the other horses.”

That is easy to understand because in costume, Thor becomes an 18-hand dragon complete with horns, red wings, and a scaled tail. Thor, the dragon, was a huge hit, and capped off an exciting evening at the Mane Event.

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is going in a new direction, but it is the right direction for both the horse owner and the horse lover. It is safe to say that the reins of the Colorado Horse Council have been passed to capable hands and the equine industry in Colorado can expect big things in the future.

Bill Scebbi takes over the reins as executive director of the Colorado Horse Council from Brian Kitchen, who has taken a position in his home of Canada, and leads the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo in a slightly different direction.

Scebbi, who has been in Colorado since 1979, is not new to the Colorado Horse Council or the horse industry. He has been in the equine association industry for 32 years, including 10 years with the Arabian horse industry and 17 years as the executive director and chief executive officer of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association.

Bill also served on the Colorado Horse Council Board of Directors for 12 years. “I understand the background and what the Horse Association is all about,” Scebbi said, “I have some different ideas right now on where we need to lead the Horse Council in these economic times as we build the organization for the future.”

Part of the mission of the Colorado Horse Council, Scebbi said, “is to assist owners in understanding how to train and be with their horse and enjoy the horse. The Horse Council also wants to give them options for their horse in different activities, and also in the business aspect and the responsibility of horse ownership.”

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is the premier public event put on by the Colorado Horse Council and under Scebbi’s guidance, their will be some changes that will make the Horse Expo even better for the horse owner and the horse lover. This year, in addition to the fun events there has been a real emphasis placed on educating the horse lover. With 32 clinicians and speakers, there was something for every one.

In previous years the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo was a series of smaller events scattered throughout the state. Starting in 2010 the Horse Council will put all of its resources and energy into a single event held in Denver. “We are going to continue to add more horses and horse activities to the Expo so owners can bring their horse and enjoy their own horses at the Expo,” Scebbi said. “This year we started a new program called Ride with the Experts and it has been really successful.

“We introduced the project in late January and got a really good response to it. Horse owners can actually ride with the clinicians that we bring in, in their clinic arena. The people that you see working with Cody Crow, are not people that Cody brought in, they are people that signed up to ride with Cody Crow. People can bring their own horses, ride with the clinicians, and learn a little bit more about themselves and their horses.”

Another change that went over well with everyone is a small paddock on the Trade Show floor. The first thing that a patron sees as they enter the Trade Show is a huge Shire stallion or perhaps a small Icelandic horse. There was plenty of excitement among horse lovers and especially the kids.

The ticketed Mane Event which featured horses, music, lights, demonstration acts, and all the things that horse lovers enjoy watching horses do, was introduced this year and the fans loved it.

There were demonstration events like Team Penning, an event that anyone who has a horse that is just a little bit “cowey” can compete in. There was a demonstration by the Golden Vaulters. Vaulting is a little like gymnastics on horseback and the audience was amazed by the skill and daring displayed by the all girl team from Golden, Colo.

There were a couple of demonstrations of draft horses at work which included delivery wagon work and two horse hitches pulling logs. There was a demonstration of freestyle reining performed simultaneously by three Colorado Reining Champions.

The famous Westernairs performed their intricate spiraling and crossing patterns followed up by an amazing demonstration of roman riding between flaming torches. Interwoven in all of this were breed demonstrations which included Gypsy Vanner, Icelandic Horses, Kiger Mustangs from Washington state, American Saddlebred, Arabians, and the Peruvian Paso, which is the only 100 percent naturally gaited horse in the world.

Add to this the beauty of dancing Andalusians and the incredible horsemanship exhibited by Ruben Villasenor riding his 12-year-old Polish Arabian stallion in what he called Western Dressage and it would seem to be a pretty complete night. But the Mane Event had saved the best for last. Thor is an 18-hand Shire stallion. He is a 5-year-old Orrill Speaker’s horse and he was ridden by her mother Amanda. “Thor usually goes last,” said Amanda, “because when he is in costume, he scares the other horses.”

That is easy to understand because in costume, Thor becomes an 18-hand dragon complete with horns, red wings, and a scaled tail. Thor, the dragon, was a huge hit, and capped off an exciting evening at the Mane Event.

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is going in a new direction, but it is the right direction for both the horse owner and the horse lover. It is safe to say that the reins of the Colorado Horse Council have been passed to capable hands and the equine industry in Colorado can expect big things in the future.

Bill Scebbi takes over the reins as executive director of the Colorado Horse Council from Brian Kitchen, who has taken a position in his home of Canada, and leads the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo in a slightly different direction.

Scebbi, who has been in Colorado since 1979, is not new to the Colorado Horse Council or the horse industry. He has been in the equine association industry for 32 years, including 10 years with the Arabian horse industry and 17 years as the executive director and chief executive officer of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association.

Bill also served on the Colorado Horse Council Board of Directors for 12 years. “I understand the background and what the Horse Association is all about,” Scebbi said, “I have some different ideas right now on where we need to lead the Horse Council in these economic times as we build the organization for the future.”

Part of the mission of the Colorado Horse Council, Scebbi said, “is to assist owners in understanding how to train and be with their horse and enjoy the horse. The Horse Council also wants to give them options for their horse in different activities, and also in the business aspect and the responsibility of horse ownership.”

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is the premier public event put on by the Colorado Horse Council and under Scebbi’s guidance, their will be some changes that will make the Horse Expo even better for the horse owner and the horse lover. This year, in addition to the fun events there has been a real emphasis placed on educating the horse lover. With 32 clinicians and speakers, there was something for every one.

In previous years the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo was a series of smaller events scattered throughout the state. Starting in 2010 the Horse Council will put all of its resources and energy into a single event held in Denver. “We are going to continue to add more horses and horse activities to the Expo so owners can bring their horse and enjoy their own horses at the Expo,” Scebbi said. “This year we started a new program called Ride with the Experts and it has been really successful.

“We introduced the project in late January and got a really good response to it. Horse owners can actually ride with the clinicians that we bring in, in their clinic arena. The people that you see working with Cody Crow, are not people that Cody brought in, they are people that signed up to ride with Cody Crow. People can bring their own horses, ride with the clinicians, and learn a little bit more about themselves and their horses.”

Another change that went over well with everyone is a small paddock on the Trade Show floor. The first thing that a patron sees as they enter the Trade Show is a huge Shire stallion or perhaps a small Icelandic horse. There was plenty of excitement among horse lovers and especially the kids.

The ticketed Mane Event which featured horses, music, lights, demonstration acts, and all the things that horse lovers enjoy watching horses do, was introduced this year and the fans loved it.

There were demonstration events like Team Penning, an event that anyone who has a horse that is just a little bit “cowey” can compete in. There was a demonstration by the Golden Vaulters. Vaulting is a little like gymnastics on horseback and the audience was amazed by the skill and daring displayed by the all girl team from Golden, Colo.

There were a couple of demonstrations of draft horses at work which included delivery wagon work and two horse hitches pulling logs. There was a demonstration of freestyle reining performed simultaneously by three Colorado Reining Champions.

The famous Westernairs performed their intricate spiraling and crossing patterns followed up by an amazing demonstration of roman riding between flaming torches. Interwoven in all of this were breed demonstrations which included Gypsy Vanner, Icelandic Horses, Kiger Mustangs from Washington state, American Saddlebred, Arabians, and the Peruvian Paso, which is the only 100 percent naturally gaited horse in the world.

Add to this the beauty of dancing Andalusians and the incredible horsemanship exhibited by Ruben Villasenor riding his 12-year-old Polish Arabian stallion in what he called Western Dressage and it would seem to be a pretty complete night. But the Mane Event had saved the best for last. Thor is an 18-hand Shire stallion. He is a 5-year-old Orrill Speaker’s horse and he was ridden by her mother Amanda. “Thor usually goes last,” said Amanda, “because when he is in costume, he scares the other horses.”

That is easy to understand because in costume, Thor becomes an 18-hand dragon complete with horns, red wings, and a scaled tail. Thor, the dragon, was a huge hit, and capped off an exciting evening at the Mane Event.

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is going in a new direction, but it is the right direction for both the horse owner and the horse lover. It is safe to say that the reins of the Colorado Horse Council have been passed to capable hands and the equine industry in Colorado can expect big things in the future.

Bill Scebbi takes over the reins as executive director of the Colorado Horse Council from Brian Kitchen, who has taken a position in his home of Canada, and leads the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo in a slightly different direction.

Scebbi, who has been in Colorado since 1979, is not new to the Colorado Horse Council or the horse industry. He has been in the equine association industry for 32 years, including 10 years with the Arabian horse industry and 17 years as the executive director and chief executive officer of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association.

Bill also served on the Colorado Horse Council Board of Directors for 12 years. “I understand the background and what the Horse Association is all about,” Scebbi said, “I have some different ideas right now on where we need to lead the Horse Council in these economic times as we build the organization for the future.”

Part of the mission of the Colorado Horse Council, Scebbi said, “is to assist owners in understanding how to train and be with their horse and enjoy the horse. The Horse Council also wants to give them options for their horse in different activities, and also in the business aspect and the responsibility of horse ownership.”

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is the premier public event put on by the Colorado Horse Council and under Scebbi’s guidance, their will be some changes that will make the Horse Expo even better for the horse owner and the horse lover. This year, in addition to the fun events there has been a real emphasis placed on educating the horse lover. With 32 clinicians and speakers, there was something for every one.

In previous years the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo was a series of smaller events scattered throughout the state. Starting in 2010 the Horse Council will put all of its resources and energy into a single event held in Denver. “We are going to continue to add more horses and horse activities to the Expo so owners can bring their horse and enjoy their own horses at the Expo,” Scebbi said. “This year we started a new program called Ride with the Experts and it has been really successful.

“We introduced the project in late January and got a really good response to it. Horse owners can actually ride with the clinicians that we bring in, in their clinic arena. The people that you see working with Cody Crow, are not people that Cody brought in, they are people that signed up to ride with Cody Crow. People can bring their own horses, ride with the clinicians, and learn a little bit more about themselves and their horses.”

Another change that went over well with everyone is a small paddock on the Trade Show floor. The first thing that a patron sees as they enter the Trade Show is a huge Shire stallion or perhaps a small Icelandic horse. There was plenty of excitement among horse lovers and especially the kids.

The ticketed Mane Event which featured horses, music, lights, demonstration acts, and all the things that horse lovers enjoy watching horses do, was introduced this year and the fans loved it.

There were demonstration events like Team Penning, an event that anyone who has a horse that is just a little bit “cowey” can compete in. There was a demonstration by the Golden Vaulters. Vaulting is a little like gymnastics on horseback and the audience was amazed by the skill and daring displayed by the all girl team from Golden, Colo.

There were a couple of demonstrations of draft horses at work which included delivery wagon work and two horse hitches pulling logs. There was a demonstration of freestyle reining performed simultaneously by three Colorado Reining Champions.

The famous Westernairs performed their intricate spiraling and crossing patterns followed up by an amazing demonstration of roman riding between flaming torches. Interwoven in all of this were breed demonstrations which included Gypsy Vanner, Icelandic Horses, Kiger Mustangs from Washington state, American Saddlebred, Arabians, and the Peruvian Paso, which is the only 100 percent naturally gaited horse in the world.

Add to this the beauty of dancing Andalusians and the incredible horsemanship exhibited by Ruben Villasenor riding his 12-year-old Polish Arabian stallion in what he called Western Dressage and it would seem to be a pretty complete night. But the Mane Event had saved the best for last. Thor is an 18-hand Shire stallion. He is a 5-year-old Orrill Speaker’s horse and he was ridden by her mother Amanda. “Thor usually goes last,” said Amanda, “because when he is in costume, he scares the other horses.”

That is easy to understand because in costume, Thor becomes an 18-hand dragon complete with horns, red wings, and a scaled tail. Thor, the dragon, was a huge hit, and capped off an exciting evening at the Mane Event.

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is going in a new direction, but it is the right direction for both the horse owner and the horse lover. It is safe to say that the reins of the Colorado Horse Council have been passed to capable hands and the equine industry in Colorado can expect big things in the future.

Bill Scebbi takes over the reins as executive director of the Colorado Horse Council from Brian Kitchen, who has taken a position in his home of Canada, and leads the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo in a slightly different direction.

Scebbi, who has been in Colorado since 1979, is not new to the Colorado Horse Council or the horse industry. He has been in the equine association industry for 32 years, including 10 years with the Arabian horse industry and 17 years as the executive director and chief executive officer of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association.

Bill also served on the Colorado Horse Council Board of Directors for 12 years. “I understand the background and what the Horse Association is all about,” Scebbi said, “I have some different ideas right now on where we need to lead the Horse Council in these economic times as we build the organization for the future.”

Part of the mission of the Colorado Horse Council, Scebbi said, “is to assist owners in understanding how to train and be with their horse and enjoy the horse. The Horse Council also wants to give them options for their horse in different activities, and also in the business aspect and the responsibility of horse ownership.”

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is the premier public event put on by the Colorado Horse Council and under Scebbi’s guidance, their will be some changes that will make the Horse Expo even better for the horse owner and the horse lover. This year, in addition to the fun events there has been a real emphasis placed on educating the horse lover. With 32 clinicians and speakers, there was something for every one.

In previous years the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo was a series of smaller events scattered throughout the state. Starting in 2010 the Horse Council will put all of its resources and energy into a single event held in Denver. “We are going to continue to add more horses and horse activities to the Expo so owners can bring their horse and enjoy their own horses at the Expo,” Scebbi said. “This year we started a new program called Ride with the Experts and it has been really successful.

“We introduced the project in late January and got a really good response to it. Horse owners can actually ride with the clinicians that we bring in, in their clinic arena. The people that you see working with Cody Crow, are not people that Cody brought in, they are people that signed up to ride with Cody Crow. People can bring their own horses, ride with the clinicians, and learn a little bit more about themselves and their horses.”

Another change that went over well with everyone is a small paddock on the Trade Show floor. The first thing that a patron sees as they enter the Trade Show is a huge Shire stallion or perhaps a small Icelandic horse. There was plenty of excitement among horse lovers and especially the kids.

The ticketed Mane Event which featured horses, music, lights, demonstration acts, and all the things that horse lovers enjoy watching horses do, was introduced this year and the fans loved it.

There were demonstration events like Team Penning, an event that anyone who has a horse that is just a little bit “cowey” can compete in. There was a demonstration by the Golden Vaulters. Vaulting is a little like gymnastics on horseback and the audience was amazed by the skill and daring displayed by the all girl team from Golden, Colo.

There were a couple of demonstrations of draft horses at work which included delivery wagon work and two horse hitches pulling logs. There was a demonstration of freestyle reining performed simultaneously by three Colorado Reining Champions.

The famous Westernairs performed their intricate spiraling and crossing patterns followed up by an amazing demonstration of roman riding between flaming torches. Interwoven in all of this were breed demonstrations which included Gypsy Vanner, Icelandic Horses, Kiger Mustangs from Washington state, American Saddlebred, Arabians, and the Peruvian Paso, which is the only 100 percent naturally gaited horse in the world.

Add to this the beauty of dancing Andalusians and the incredible horsemanship exhibited by Ruben Villasenor riding his 12-year-old Polish Arabian stallion in what he called Western Dressage and it would seem to be a pretty complete night. But the Mane Event had saved the best for last. Thor is an 18-hand Shire stallion. He is a 5-year-old Orrill Speaker’s horse and he was ridden by her mother Amanda. “Thor usually goes last,” said Amanda, “because when he is in costume, he scares the other horses.”

That is easy to understand because in costume, Thor becomes an 18-hand dragon complete with horns, red wings, and a scaled tail. Thor, the dragon, was a huge hit, and capped off an exciting evening at the Mane Event.

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is going in a new direction, but it is the right direction for both the horse owner and the horse lover. It is safe to say that the reins of the Colorado Horse Council have been passed to capable hands and the equine industry in Colorado can expect big things in the future.

Bill Scebbi takes over the reins as executive director of the Colorado Horse Council from Brian Kitchen, who has taken a position in his home of Canada, and leads the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo in a slightly different direction.

Scebbi, who has been in Colorado since 1979, is not new to the Colorado Horse Council or the horse industry. He has been in the equine association industry for 32 years, including 10 years with the Arabian horse industry and 17 years as the executive director and chief executive officer of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association.

Bill also served on the Colorado Horse Council Board of Directors for 12 years. “I understand the background and what the Horse Association is all about,” Scebbi said, “I have some different ideas right now on where we need to lead the Horse Council in these economic times as we build the organization for the future.”

Part of the mission of the Colorado Horse Council, Scebbi said, “is to assist owners in understanding how to train and be with their horse and enjoy the horse. The Horse Council also wants to give them options for their horse in different activities, and also in the business aspect and the responsibility of horse ownership.”

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is the premier public event put on by the Colorado Horse Council and under Scebbi’s guidance, their will be some changes that will make the Horse Expo even better for the horse owner and the horse lover. This year, in addition to the fun events there has been a real emphasis placed on educating the horse lover. With 32 clinicians and speakers, there was something for every one.

In previous years the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo was a series of smaller events scattered throughout the state. Starting in 2010 the Horse Council will put all of its resources and energy into a single event held in Denver. “We are going to continue to add more horses and horse activities to the Expo so owners can bring their horse and enjoy their own horses at the Expo,” Scebbi said. “This year we started a new program called Ride with the Experts and it has been really successful.

“We introduced the project in late January and got a really good response to it. Horse owners can actually ride with the clinicians that we bring in, in their clinic arena. The people that you see working with Cody Crow, are not people that Cody brought in, they are people that signed up to ride with Cody Crow. People can bring their own horses, ride with the clinicians, and learn a little bit more about themselves and their horses.”

Another change that went over well with everyone is a small paddock on the Trade Show floor. The first thing that a patron sees as they enter the Trade Show is a huge Shire stallion or perhaps a small Icelandic horse. There was plenty of excitement among horse lovers and especially the kids.

The ticketed Mane Event which featured horses, music, lights, demonstration acts, and all the things that horse lovers enjoy watching horses do, was introduced this year and the fans loved it.

There were demonstration events like Team Penning, an event that anyone who has a horse that is just a little bit “cowey” can compete in. There was a demonstration by the Golden Vaulters. Vaulting is a little like gymnastics on horseback and the audience was amazed by the skill and daring displayed by the all girl team from Golden, Colo.

There were a couple of demonstrations of draft horses at work which included delivery wagon work and two horse hitches pulling logs. There was a demonstration of freestyle reining performed simultaneously by three Colorado Reining Champions.

The famous Westernairs performed their intricate spiraling and crossing patterns followed up by an amazing demonstration of roman riding between flaming torches. Interwoven in all of this were breed demonstrations which included Gypsy Vanner, Icelandic Horses, Kiger Mustangs from Washington state, American Saddlebred, Arabians, and the Peruvian Paso, which is the only 100 percent naturally gaited horse in the world.

Add to this the beauty of dancing Andalusians and the incredible horsemanship exhibited by Ruben Villasenor riding his 12-year-old Polish Arabian stallion in what he called Western Dressage and it would seem to be a pretty complete night. But the Mane Event had saved the best for last. Thor is an 18-hand Shire stallion. He is a 5-year-old Orrill Speaker’s horse and he was ridden by her mother Amanda. “Thor usually goes last,” said Amanda, “because when he is in costume, he scares the other horses.”

That is easy to understand because in costume, Thor becomes an 18-hand dragon complete with horns, red wings, and a scaled tail. Thor, the dragon, was a huge hit, and capped off an exciting evening at the Mane Event.

The Rocky Mountain Horse Expo is going in a new direction, but it is the right direction for both the horse owner and the horse lover. It is safe to say that the reins of the Colorado Horse Council have been passed to capable hands and the equine industry in Colorado can expect big things in the future.