NWSS Opens Buck Season for 2011! | TheFencePost.com

NWSS Opens Buck Season for 2011!

The National Western Stock Show (NWSS) opened Buck Season in 2011, and everyone hunting for chills and thrills left with their bag limit and more during the championship round of rodeo action on Sunday, January 23. Twenty-two energetic PRCA performances led to the climactic final round, leaving 96 cowboys and cowgirls aiming for buckles in eight events and gunning for a piece of that total purse worth over $500,000.

Rock and roll, fireworks and flames introduced the event on a mile high afternoon, with veteran rodeo announcer Boyd Polhamus whipping the crowd into full voice as he described rodeo resume’s and exploits for anyone who could hear over the bedlam inside the Denver Coliseum.

“I love this crowd,” said Polhamus about the loud and enthusiastic fans. “When I say this is the best place to announce a rodeo because the crowd is the most active, I mean it.” Polhamus also summed up the superb action responsible for making the crowds go wild. “(The) NFR horses and the NFR guys, people pay a scalper $400 to sit in a nosebleed seat in (Las Vegas) to watch what we saw here today.”

What they saw was wall-to-wall western excitement; including big names targeting first place while surprising names sniped away for their share of rodeo glory.

A top name managing to bag his goal was Texas bareback rider Will Lowe. Starting the day a few points back, the two-time world champ gunned Calgary Stampede’s Street Dance inside the arena for a score of 89 points and a good shot at weathering the four riders ahead on the card. When young Canadian rider Jake Vold’s initial try for a first place check ended in a re-ride option and then the second rough ride came up short, Lowe had his first place check for the final round and the average. The crowd went nuts, but that was just the beginning.

Although watching bareback riders can make the sport seem like a young man’s game, the steer wrestling action put that notion to rest. With a scorecard bursting at the seams with notables like Branquinho, Gorsuch and Suhn, it was 41-year-old Darrell Petry who brought the assembled throng to its feet. After the veteran Todd Suhn laid down a blistering challenge of 3.9 seconds, Petry arrived four slots later needing a 5.0 time or better to put a Denver title in his crosshairs. The Texan stepped up with 4.7 seconds to pick up a nice check while confirming his decision to make the long trek north.

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“This is a great rodeo, but every time I came out here I’ve been in a blizzard, so I was debating on whether or not to come this year,” said Petry after his victory. “So the weather broke in time and I was like, man, it must be a sign, the roads are clear. So I’m glad I made it.”

The crowd was glad he made it, as well, giving the big competitor a standing ovation after his win. The act wasn’t lost on Petry, but in good fun he quibbled over the reason.

“Everybody was like, man, you got a standing ovation,” said Petry with a smile and some laughter. “I was like, that’s when they said I was 41-years-old. That’s why they stood up.”

It wasn’t just steer wrestlers providing entertainment; everyone there had more reasons to stand when the team ropers hit the arena. Outlasting competitors bearing famous last names like Bach and Brazile, Clay Tryan and Travis Graves finally picked up the elusive NWSS title they’d almost grabbed numerous times before. It was an achievement the duo was happy to earn.

“I’ve won second here a couple of times, third, fourth and fifth, but never won it,” began Tryan when asked how it felt to finally win the historic venue’s buckle “It was exciting to win this rodeo. When you’re done and you have titles, I’d like to tell my kids I won the National Western, because I came here when I was a kid. Being from Montana, this was always known as a big time winter rodeo,” he continued. “It was the first big rodeo I’d ever been to on my card and I placed that year and that’s been 13 years ago. I’m just excited and tickled to death to win it.”

Graves was stoked, as well.

“Ever since you were a little kid you want to win this rodeo,” the Oklahoman responded. “It’s a great accomplishment and you get the year started off right. It’s a big deal in my eyes.”

Another big deal was the saddle bronc competition. Boasting solid contestants like JJ Elshere, Jesse Bail, Cody DeMoss and Heith DeMoss battling the heavy artillery of NFR horses Lunatic Fringe, Friendly Fire and Street Smart, the rollicking action didn’t disappoint. With 80 plus scores flashing on the big screen like summer fireworks, the last men standing were brothers Cody and Heith DeMoss.

Older brother Cody got the Coliseum shaking with 83 points aboard Calgary Stampede’s Labeled Money, requiring Heith to post 82 points in order to keep his lead and take the NWSS title for himself. The tension was thick when the gate swung wide and Heith exploded into the arena on a snow-white bucker named Avalanche (another Calgary Stampede mount). The Louisiana cowboy rode the storm for, you guessed it, 82 points and a decibel shattering first place finish by one point over his big brother.

Next up were the Tie Down Ropers, and they weren’t about to let the crowd rest its voice. With a slugger’s lineup boasting Trevor Brazile, Cody Ohl, Mike Johnson, Clint Cooper and Tuf Cooper, it looked like a big name would bag the top prize. The memo didn’t make its way to young guns Cory Solomon and Justin Macha, however, or if it did, the pair of Texas cowboys didn’t let on.

Although Brazile and Clint Cooper showed off respective 8.4 and 8.1 times, Solomon and Macha never flinched. Coming into the championship round in second place, Solomon snared a black calf in 8.2 seconds to show his mettle and get the spectators enthused.

“To rope against those kind of guys is good,” said Solomon about his well-known NWSS contestants. “To put me up against those kind of guys (in a round), it don’t back me down. It actually makes me really step up and get to show my talent.”

Up last to show some talent was Justin Macha, who took the long road into the rodeo through the qualifying rounds and surprised everyone by arriving Sunday on top of the leaderboard. Just like Solomon, Macha delivered an 8.2 second time to win his first NWSS buckle and send the fans into pandemonium.

“Oh gosh, it was great,” said Macha when asked about his win. “Denver’s always a big rodeo and it feels awesome.”

Questioned about the high-energy crowd and the big rodeo atmosphere, Macha had nothing but praise for the historic locale.

“It’s awesome from start to finish,” he said of the rodeo’s feel. “With fireworks getting you pumped up and the crowd, the crowd was great and loud. I love the intensity.”

The intensity kept going into the barrel racing competition. Although nine competitors were ahead of Oklahoma cowgirl Susan Kay Smith, including three-time NWSS winner Brittany Pozzi, Smith blew through the pattern in a 2011 stock show best time of 14.94 seconds. It turned out she needed every bit of that quick time to take home the buckle by only .01 over second place finisher Brenda Mays.

Once the barrels were removed, the music cranked and so did the crowd for the highlight bull riding event. Washington state cowboy Shane Proctor held a tidy lead after winning the first two rounds and was looking for a clean sweep. While three fellow contestants warmed the crowd up with 80 plus point efforts, Proctor brought the house down after scoring 90 points on Calgary Stampede’s Edgar and pocketing a NWSS rodeo best $17,350 for a coveted buckle and a great start to 2011.

“The stock show is always fun to come to,” said Proctor afterward. “It’s one of the highlight rodeos of the year, it’s the one the guys dream of winning. The tradition here is outstanding (and) it’s a great crowd to be in front of.”

Asked to break down his ride, Proctor obliged.

“(It was) a big brindle bull out there rounding left and then back to the right,” he described. “Really showy and fun to ride. He was really rider friendly, which worked out with the way I was leading,” Proctor added. “It was just a fun bull to be on and it was a great draw to have here, especially with the way things worked out.”

Things not only worked out well for Proctor, they worked out well for NWSS officials, who were pleased with 2011’s rodeo showing.

“I thought it was a great, great rodeo performance today,” praised Marvin Witt, NWSS V.P. of Operations. “It’s probably one of the better ones we’ve done. The crowd was electric (and) this old building just rocks. When you sell out like that and you have a performance like that … you can’t ask for much more.”

While it may not be fair to ask for much more, it’s a good bet sell-out crowds will be there next January ready to open another exhilarating Buck Season.

The National Western Stock Show (NWSS) opened Buck Season in 2011, and everyone hunting for chills and thrills left with their bag limit and more during the championship round of rodeo action on Sunday, January 23. Twenty-two energetic PRCA performances led to the climactic final round, leaving 96 cowboys and cowgirls aiming for buckles in eight events and gunning for a piece of that total purse worth over $500,000.

Rock and roll, fireworks and flames introduced the event on a mile high afternoon, with veteran rodeo announcer Boyd Polhamus whipping the crowd into full voice as he described rodeo resume’s and exploits for anyone who could hear over the bedlam inside the Denver Coliseum.

“I love this crowd,” said Polhamus about the loud and enthusiastic fans. “When I say this is the best place to announce a rodeo because the crowd is the most active, I mean it.” Polhamus also summed up the superb action responsible for making the crowds go wild. “(The) NFR horses and the NFR guys, people pay a scalper $400 to sit in a nosebleed seat in (Las Vegas) to watch what we saw here today.”

What they saw was wall-to-wall western excitement; including big names targeting first place while surprising names sniped away for their share of rodeo glory.

A top name managing to bag his goal was Texas bareback rider Will Lowe. Starting the day a few points back, the two-time world champ gunned Calgary Stampede’s Street Dance inside the arena for a score of 89 points and a good shot at weathering the four riders ahead on the card. When young Canadian rider Jake Vold’s initial try for a first place check ended in a re-ride option and then the second rough ride came up short, Lowe had his first place check for the final round and the average. The crowd went nuts, but that was just the beginning.

Although watching bareback riders can make the sport seem like a young man’s game, the steer wrestling action put that notion to rest. With a scorecard bursting at the seams with notables like Branquinho, Gorsuch and Suhn, it was 41-year-old Darrell Petry who brought the assembled throng to its feet. After the veteran Todd Suhn laid down a blistering challenge of 3.9 seconds, Petry arrived four slots later needing a 5.0 time or better to put a Denver title in his crosshairs. The Texan stepped up with 4.7 seconds to pick up a nice check while confirming his decision to make the long trek north.

“This is a great rodeo, but every time I came out here I’ve been in a blizzard, so I was debating on whether or not to come this year,” said Petry after his victory. “So the weather broke in time and I was like, man, it must be a sign, the roads are clear. So I’m glad I made it.”

The crowd was glad he made it, as well, giving the big competitor a standing ovation after his win. The act wasn’t lost on Petry, but in good fun he quibbled over the reason.

“Everybody was like, man, you got a standing ovation,” said Petry with a smile and some laughter. “I was like, that’s when they said I was 41-years-old. That’s why they stood up.”

It wasn’t just steer wrestlers providing entertainment; everyone there had more reasons to stand when the team ropers hit the arena. Outlasting competitors bearing famous last names like Bach and Brazile, Clay Tryan and Travis Graves finally picked up the elusive NWSS title they’d almost grabbed numerous times before. It was an achievement the duo was happy to earn.

“I’ve won second here a couple of times, third, fourth and fifth, but never won it,” began Tryan when asked how it felt to finally win the historic venue’s buckle “It was exciting to win this rodeo. When you’re done and you have titles, I’d like to tell my kids I won the National Western, because I came here when I was a kid. Being from Montana, this was always known as a big time winter rodeo,” he continued. “It was the first big rodeo I’d ever been to on my card and I placed that year and that’s been 13 years ago. I’m just excited and tickled to death to win it.”

Graves was stoked, as well.

“Ever since you were a little kid you want to win this rodeo,” the Oklahoman responded. “It’s a great accomplishment and you get the year started off right. It’s a big deal in my eyes.”

Another big deal was the saddle bronc competition. Boasting solid contestants like JJ Elshere, Jesse Bail, Cody DeMoss and Heith DeMoss battling the heavy artillery of NFR horses Lunatic Fringe, Friendly Fire and Street Smart, the rollicking action didn’t disappoint. With 80 plus scores flashing on the big screen like summer fireworks, the last men standing were brothers Cody and Heith DeMoss.

Older brother Cody got the Coliseum shaking with 83 points aboard Calgary Stampede’s Labeled Money, requiring Heith to post 82 points in order to keep his lead and take the NWSS title for himself. The tension was thick when the gate swung wide and Heith exploded into the arena on a snow-white bucker named Avalanche (another Calgary Stampede mount). The Louisiana cowboy rode the storm for, you guessed it, 82 points and a decibel shattering first place finish by one point over his big brother.

Next up were the Tie Down Ropers, and they weren’t about to let the crowd rest its voice. With a slugger’s lineup boasting Trevor Brazile, Cody Ohl, Mike Johnson, Clint Cooper and Tuf Cooper, it looked like a big name would bag the top prize. The memo didn’t make its way to young guns Cory Solomon and Justin Macha, however, or if it did, the pair of Texas cowboys didn’t let on.

Although Brazile and Clint Cooper showed off respective 8.4 and 8.1 times, Solomon and Macha never flinched. Coming into the championship round in second place, Solomon snared a black calf in 8.2 seconds to show his mettle and get the spectators enthused.

“To rope against those kind of guys is good,” said Solomon about his well-known NWSS contestants. “To put me up against those kind of guys (in a round), it don’t back me down. It actually makes me really step up and get to show my talent.”

Up last to show some talent was Justin Macha, who took the long road into the rodeo through the qualifying rounds and surprised everyone by arriving Sunday on top of the leaderboard. Just like Solomon, Macha delivered an 8.2 second time to win his first NWSS buckle and send the fans into pandemonium.

“Oh gosh, it was great,” said Macha when asked about his win. “Denver’s always a big rodeo and it feels awesome.”

Questioned about the high-energy crowd and the big rodeo atmosphere, Macha had nothing but praise for the historic locale.

“It’s awesome from start to finish,” he said of the rodeo’s feel. “With fireworks getting you pumped up and the crowd, the crowd was great and loud. I love the intensity.”

The intensity kept going into the barrel racing competition. Although nine competitors were ahead of Oklahoma cowgirl Susan Kay Smith, including three-time NWSS winner Brittany Pozzi, Smith blew through the pattern in a 2011 stock show best time of 14.94 seconds. It turned out she needed every bit of that quick time to take home the buckle by only .01 over second place finisher Brenda Mays.

Once the barrels were removed, the music cranked and so did the crowd for the highlight bull riding event. Washington state cowboy Shane Proctor held a tidy lead after winning the first two rounds and was looking for a clean sweep. While three fellow contestants warmed the crowd up with 80 plus point efforts, Proctor brought the house down after scoring 90 points on Calgary Stampede’s Edgar and pocketing a NWSS rodeo best $17,350 for a coveted buckle and a great start to 2011.

“The stock show is always fun to come to,” said Proctor afterward. “It’s one of the highlight rodeos of the year, it’s the one the guys dream of winning. The tradition here is outstanding (and) it’s a great crowd to be in front of.”

Asked to break down his ride, Proctor obliged.

“(It was) a big brindle bull out there rounding left and then back to the right,” he described. “Really showy and fun to ride. He was really rider friendly, which worked out with the way I was leading,” Proctor added. “It was just a fun bull to be on and it was a great draw to have here, especially with the way things worked out.”

Things not only worked out well for Proctor, they worked out well for NWSS officials, who were pleased with 2011’s rodeo showing.

“I thought it was a great, great rodeo performance today,” praised Marvin Witt, NWSS V.P. of Operations. “It’s probably one of the better ones we’ve done. The crowd was electric (and) this old building just rocks. When you sell out like that and you have a performance like that … you can’t ask for much more.”

While it may not be fair to ask for much more, it’s a good bet sell-out crowds will be there next January ready to open another exhilarating Buck Season.

The National Western Stock Show (NWSS) opened Buck Season in 2011, and everyone hunting for chills and thrills left with their bag limit and more during the championship round of rodeo action on Sunday, January 23. Twenty-two energetic PRCA performances led to the climactic final round, leaving 96 cowboys and cowgirls aiming for buckles in eight events and gunning for a piece of that total purse worth over $500,000.

Rock and roll, fireworks and flames introduced the event on a mile high afternoon, with veteran rodeo announcer Boyd Polhamus whipping the crowd into full voice as he described rodeo resume’s and exploits for anyone who could hear over the bedlam inside the Denver Coliseum.

“I love this crowd,” said Polhamus about the loud and enthusiastic fans. “When I say this is the best place to announce a rodeo because the crowd is the most active, I mean it.” Polhamus also summed up the superb action responsible for making the crowds go wild. “(The) NFR horses and the NFR guys, people pay a scalper $400 to sit in a nosebleed seat in (Las Vegas) to watch what we saw here today.”

What they saw was wall-to-wall western excitement; including big names targeting first place while surprising names sniped away for their share of rodeo glory.

A top name managing to bag his goal was Texas bareback rider Will Lowe. Starting the day a few points back, the two-time world champ gunned Calgary Stampede’s Street Dance inside the arena for a score of 89 points and a good shot at weathering the four riders ahead on the card. When young Canadian rider Jake Vold’s initial try for a first place check ended in a re-ride option and then the second rough ride came up short, Lowe had his first place check for the final round and the average. The crowd went nuts, but that was just the beginning.

Although watching bareback riders can make the sport seem like a young man’s game, the steer wrestling action put that notion to rest. With a scorecard bursting at the seams with notables like Branquinho, Gorsuch and Suhn, it was 41-year-old Darrell Petry who brought the assembled throng to its feet. After the veteran Todd Suhn laid down a blistering challenge of 3.9 seconds, Petry arrived four slots later needing a 5.0 time or better to put a Denver title in his crosshairs. The Texan stepped up with 4.7 seconds to pick up a nice check while confirming his decision to make the long trek north.

“This is a great rodeo, but every time I came out here I’ve been in a blizzard, so I was debating on whether or not to come this year,” said Petry after his victory. “So the weather broke in time and I was like, man, it must be a sign, the roads are clear. So I’m glad I made it.”

The crowd was glad he made it, as well, giving the big competitor a standing ovation after his win. The act wasn’t lost on Petry, but in good fun he quibbled over the reason.

“Everybody was like, man, you got a standing ovation,” said Petry with a smile and some laughter. “I was like, that’s when they said I was 41-years-old. That’s why they stood up.”

It wasn’t just steer wrestlers providing entertainment; everyone there had more reasons to stand when the team ropers hit the arena. Outlasting competitors bearing famous last names like Bach and Brazile, Clay Tryan and Travis Graves finally picked up the elusive NWSS title they’d almost grabbed numerous times before. It was an achievement the duo was happy to earn.

“I’ve won second here a couple of times, third, fourth and fifth, but never won it,” began Tryan when asked how it felt to finally win the historic venue’s buckle “It was exciting to win this rodeo. When you’re done and you have titles, I’d like to tell my kids I won the National Western, because I came here when I was a kid. Being from Montana, this was always known as a big time winter rodeo,” he continued. “It was the first big rodeo I’d ever been to on my card and I placed that year and that’s been 13 years ago. I’m just excited and tickled to death to win it.”

Graves was stoked, as well.

“Ever since you were a little kid you want to win this rodeo,” the Oklahoman responded. “It’s a great accomplishment and you get the year started off right. It’s a big deal in my eyes.”

Another big deal was the saddle bronc competition. Boasting solid contestants like JJ Elshere, Jesse Bail, Cody DeMoss and Heith DeMoss battling the heavy artillery of NFR horses Lunatic Fringe, Friendly Fire and Street Smart, the rollicking action didn’t disappoint. With 80 plus scores flashing on the big screen like summer fireworks, the last men standing were brothers Cody and Heith DeMoss.

Older brother Cody got the Coliseum shaking with 83 points aboard Calgary Stampede’s Labeled Money, requiring Heith to post 82 points in order to keep his lead and take the NWSS title for himself. The tension was thick when the gate swung wide and Heith exploded into the arena on a snow-white bucker named Avalanche (another Calgary Stampede mount). The Louisiana cowboy rode the storm for, you guessed it, 82 points and a decibel shattering first place finish by one point over his big brother.

Next up were the Tie Down Ropers, and they weren’t about to let the crowd rest its voice. With a slugger’s lineup boasting Trevor Brazile, Cody Ohl, Mike Johnson, Clint Cooper and Tuf Cooper, it looked like a big name would bag the top prize. The memo didn’t make its way to young guns Cory Solomon and Justin Macha, however, or if it did, the pair of Texas cowboys didn’t let on.

Although Brazile and Clint Cooper showed off respective 8.4 and 8.1 times, Solomon and Macha never flinched. Coming into the championship round in second place, Solomon snared a black calf in 8.2 seconds to show his mettle and get the spectators enthused.

“To rope against those kind of guys is good,” said Solomon about his well-known NWSS contestants. “To put me up against those kind of guys (in a round), it don’t back me down. It actually makes me really step up and get to show my talent.”

Up last to show some talent was Justin Macha, who took the long road into the rodeo through the qualifying rounds and surprised everyone by arriving Sunday on top of the leaderboard. Just like Solomon, Macha delivered an 8.2 second time to win his first NWSS buckle and send the fans into pandemonium.

“Oh gosh, it was great,” said Macha when asked about his win. “Denver’s always a big rodeo and it feels awesome.”

Questioned about the high-energy crowd and the big rodeo atmosphere, Macha had nothing but praise for the historic locale.

“It’s awesome from start to finish,” he said of the rodeo’s feel. “With fireworks getting you pumped up and the crowd, the crowd was great and loud. I love the intensity.”

The intensity kept going into the barrel racing competition. Although nine competitors were ahead of Oklahoma cowgirl Susan Kay Smith, including three-time NWSS winner Brittany Pozzi, Smith blew through the pattern in a 2011 stock show best time of 14.94 seconds. It turned out she needed every bit of that quick time to take home the buckle by only .01 over second place finisher Brenda Mays.

Once the barrels were removed, the music cranked and so did the crowd for the highlight bull riding event. Washington state cowboy Shane Proctor held a tidy lead after winning the first two rounds and was looking for a clean sweep. While three fellow contestants warmed the crowd up with 80 plus point efforts, Proctor brought the house down after scoring 90 points on Calgary Stampede’s Edgar and pocketing a NWSS rodeo best $17,350 for a coveted buckle and a great start to 2011.

“The stock show is always fun to come to,” said Proctor afterward. “It’s one of the highlight rodeos of the year, it’s the one the guys dream of winning. The tradition here is outstanding (and) it’s a great crowd to be in front of.”

Asked to break down his ride, Proctor obliged.

“(It was) a big brindle bull out there rounding left and then back to the right,” he described. “Really showy and fun to ride. He was really rider friendly, which worked out with the way I was leading,” Proctor added. “It was just a fun bull to be on and it was a great draw to have here, especially with the way things worked out.”

Things not only worked out well for Proctor, they worked out well for NWSS officials, who were pleased with 2011’s rodeo showing.

“I thought it was a great, great rodeo performance today,” praised Marvin Witt, NWSS V.P. of Operations. “It’s probably one of the better ones we’ve done. The crowd was electric (and) this old building just rocks. When you sell out like that and you have a performance like that … you can’t ask for much more.”

While it may not be fair to ask for much more, it’s a good bet sell-out crowds will be there next January ready to open another exhilarating Buck Season.

The National Western Stock Show (NWSS) opened Buck Season in 2011, and everyone hunting for chills and thrills left with their bag limit and more during the championship round of rodeo action on Sunday, January 23. Twenty-two energetic PRCA performances led to the climactic final round, leaving 96 cowboys and cowgirls aiming for buckles in eight events and gunning for a piece of that total purse worth over $500,000.

Rock and roll, fireworks and flames introduced the event on a mile high afternoon, with veteran rodeo announcer Boyd Polhamus whipping the crowd into full voice as he described rodeo resume’s and exploits for anyone who could hear over the bedlam inside the Denver Coliseum.

“I love this crowd,” said Polhamus about the loud and enthusiastic fans. “When I say this is the best place to announce a rodeo because the crowd is the most active, I mean it.” Polhamus also summed up the superb action responsible for making the crowds go wild. “(The) NFR horses and the NFR guys, people pay a scalper $400 to sit in a nosebleed seat in (Las Vegas) to watch what we saw here today.”

What they saw was wall-to-wall western excitement; including big names targeting first place while surprising names sniped away for their share of rodeo glory.

A top name managing to bag his goal was Texas bareback rider Will Lowe. Starting the day a few points back, the two-time world champ gunned Calgary Stampede’s Street Dance inside the arena for a score of 89 points and a good shot at weathering the four riders ahead on the card. When young Canadian rider Jake Vold’s initial try for a first place check ended in a re-ride option and then the second rough ride came up short, Lowe had his first place check for the final round and the average. The crowd went nuts, but that was just the beginning.

Although watching bareback riders can make the sport seem like a young man’s game, the steer wrestling action put that notion to rest. With a scorecard bursting at the seams with notables like Branquinho, Gorsuch and Suhn, it was 41-year-old Darrell Petry who brought the assembled throng to its feet. After the veteran Todd Suhn laid down a blistering challenge of 3.9 seconds, Petry arrived four slots later needing a 5.0 time or better to put a Denver title in his crosshairs. The Texan stepped up with 4.7 seconds to pick up a nice check while confirming his decision to make the long trek north.

“This is a great rodeo, but every time I came out here I’ve been in a blizzard, so I was debating on whether or not to come this year,” said Petry after his victory. “So the weather broke in time and I was like, man, it must be a sign, the roads are clear. So I’m glad I made it.”

The crowd was glad he made it, as well, giving the big competitor a standing ovation after his win. The act wasn’t lost on Petry, but in good fun he quibbled over the reason.

“Everybody was like, man, you got a standing ovation,” said Petry with a smile and some laughter. “I was like, that’s when they said I was 41-years-old. That’s why they stood up.”

It wasn’t just steer wrestlers providing entertainment; everyone there had more reasons to stand when the team ropers hit the arena. Outlasting competitors bearing famous last names like Bach and Brazile, Clay Tryan and Travis Graves finally picked up the elusive NWSS title they’d almost grabbed numerous times before. It was an achievement the duo was happy to earn.

“I’ve won second here a couple of times, third, fourth and fifth, but never won it,” began Tryan when asked how it felt to finally win the historic venue’s buckle “It was exciting to win this rodeo. When you’re done and you have titles, I’d like to tell my kids I won the National Western, because I came here when I was a kid. Being from Montana, this was always known as a big time winter rodeo,” he continued. “It was the first big rodeo I’d ever been to on my card and I placed that year and that’s been 13 years ago. I’m just excited and tickled to death to win it.”

Graves was stoked, as well.

“Ever since you were a little kid you want to win this rodeo,” the Oklahoman responded. “It’s a great accomplishment and you get the year started off right. It’s a big deal in my eyes.”

Another big deal was the saddle bronc competition. Boasting solid contestants like JJ Elshere, Jesse Bail, Cody DeMoss and Heith DeMoss battling the heavy artillery of NFR horses Lunatic Fringe, Friendly Fire and Street Smart, the rollicking action didn’t disappoint. With 80 plus scores flashing on the big screen like summer fireworks, the last men standing were brothers Cody and Heith DeMoss.

Older brother Cody got the Coliseum shaking with 83 points aboard Calgary Stampede’s Labeled Money, requiring Heith to post 82 points in order to keep his lead and take the NWSS title for himself. The tension was thick when the gate swung wide and Heith exploded into the arena on a snow-white bucker named Avalanche (another Calgary Stampede mount). The Louisiana cowboy rode the storm for, you guessed it, 82 points and a decibel shattering first place finish by one point over his big brother.

Next up were the Tie Down Ropers, and they weren’t about to let the crowd rest its voice. With a slugger’s lineup boasting Trevor Brazile, Cody Ohl, Mike Johnson, Clint Cooper and Tuf Cooper, it looked like a big name would bag the top prize. The memo didn’t make its way to young guns Cory Solomon and Justin Macha, however, or if it did, the pair of Texas cowboys didn’t let on.

Although Brazile and Clint Cooper showed off respective 8.4 and 8.1 times, Solomon and Macha never flinched. Coming into the championship round in second place, Solomon snared a black calf in 8.2 seconds to show his mettle and get the spectators enthused.

“To rope against those kind of guys is good,” said Solomon about his well-known NWSS contestants. “To put me up against those kind of guys (in a round), it don’t back me down. It actually makes me really step up and get to show my talent.”

Up last to show some talent was Justin Macha, who took the long road into the rodeo through the qualifying rounds and surprised everyone by arriving Sunday on top of the leaderboard. Just like Solomon, Macha delivered an 8.2 second time to win his first NWSS buckle and send the fans into pandemonium.

“Oh gosh, it was great,” said Macha when asked about his win. “Denver’s always a big rodeo and it feels awesome.”

Questioned about the high-energy crowd and the big rodeo atmosphere, Macha had nothing but praise for the historic locale.

“It’s awesome from start to finish,” he said of the rodeo’s feel. “With fireworks getting you pumped up and the crowd, the crowd was great and loud. I love the intensity.”

The intensity kept going into the barrel racing competition. Although nine competitors were ahead of Oklahoma cowgirl Susan Kay Smith, including three-time NWSS winner Brittany Pozzi, Smith blew through the pattern in a 2011 stock show best time of 14.94 seconds. It turned out she needed every bit of that quick time to take home the buckle by only .01 over second place finisher Brenda Mays.

Once the barrels were removed, the music cranked and so did the crowd for the highlight bull riding event. Washington state cowboy Shane Proctor held a tidy lead after winning the first two rounds and was looking for a clean sweep. While three fellow contestants warmed the crowd up with 80 plus point efforts, Proctor brought the house down after scoring 90 points on Calgary Stampede’s Edgar and pocketing a NWSS rodeo best $17,350 for a coveted buckle and a great start to 2011.

“The stock show is always fun to come to,” said Proctor afterward. “It’s one of the highlight rodeos of the year, it’s the one the guys dream of winning. The tradition here is outstanding (and) it’s a great crowd to be in front of.”

Asked to break down his ride, Proctor obliged.

“(It was) a big brindle bull out there rounding left and then back to the right,” he described. “Really showy and fun to ride. He was really rider friendly, which worked out with the way I was leading,” Proctor added. “It was just a fun bull to be on and it was a great draw to have here, especially with the way things worked out.”

Things not only worked out well for Proctor, they worked out well for NWSS officials, who were pleased with 2011’s rodeo showing.

“I thought it was a great, great rodeo performance today,” praised Marvin Witt, NWSS V.P. of Operations. “It’s probably one of the better ones we’ve done. The crowd was electric (and) this old building just rocks. When you sell out like that and you have a performance like that … you can’t ask for much more.”

While it may not be fair to ask for much more, it’s a good bet sell-out crowds will be there next January ready to open another exhilarating Buck Season.

The National Western Stock Show (NWSS) opened Buck Season in 2011, and everyone hunting for chills and thrills left with their bag limit and more during the championship round of rodeo action on Sunday, January 23. Twenty-two energetic PRCA performances led to the climactic final round, leaving 96 cowboys and cowgirls aiming for buckles in eight events and gunning for a piece of that total purse worth over $500,000.

Rock and roll, fireworks and flames introduced the event on a mile high afternoon, with veteran rodeo announcer Boyd Polhamus whipping the crowd into full voice as he described rodeo resume’s and exploits for anyone who could hear over the bedlam inside the Denver Coliseum.

“I love this crowd,” said Polhamus about the loud and enthusiastic fans. “When I say this is the best place to announce a rodeo because the crowd is the most active, I mean it.” Polhamus also summed up the superb action responsible for making the crowds go wild. “(The) NFR horses and the NFR guys, people pay a scalper $400 to sit in a nosebleed seat in (Las Vegas) to watch what we saw here today.”

What they saw was wall-to-wall western excitement; including big names targeting first place while surprising names sniped away for their share of rodeo glory.

A top name managing to bag his goal was Texas bareback rider Will Lowe. Starting the day a few points back, the two-time world champ gunned Calgary Stampede’s Street Dance inside the arena for a score of 89 points and a good shot at weathering the four riders ahead on the card. When young Canadian rider Jake Vold’s initial try for a first place check ended in a re-ride option and then the second rough ride came up short, Lowe had his first place check for the final round and the average. The crowd went nuts, but that was just the beginning.

Although watching bareback riders can make the sport seem like a young man’s game, the steer wrestling action put that notion to rest. With a scorecard bursting at the seams with notables like Branquinho, Gorsuch and Suhn, it was 41-year-old Darrell Petry who brought the assembled throng to its feet. After the veteran Todd Suhn laid down a blistering challenge of 3.9 seconds, Petry arrived four slots later needing a 5.0 time or better to put a Denver title in his crosshairs. The Texan stepped up with 4.7 seconds to pick up a nice check while confirming his decision to make the long trek north.

“This is a great rodeo, but every time I came out here I’ve been in a blizzard, so I was debating on whether or not to come this year,” said Petry after his victory. “So the weather broke in time and I was like, man, it must be a sign, the roads are clear. So I’m glad I made it.”

The crowd was glad he made it, as well, giving the big competitor a standing ovation after his win. The act wasn’t lost on Petry, but in good fun he quibbled over the reason.

“Everybody was like, man, you got a standing ovation,” said Petry with a smile and some laughter. “I was like, that’s when they said I was 41-years-old. That’s why they stood up.”

It wasn’t just steer wrestlers providing entertainment; everyone there had more reasons to stand when the team ropers hit the arena. Outlasting competitors bearing famous last names like Bach and Brazile, Clay Tryan and Travis Graves finally picked up the elusive NWSS title they’d almost grabbed numerous times before. It was an achievement the duo was happy to earn.

“I’ve won second here a couple of times, third, fourth and fifth, but never won it,” began Tryan when asked how it felt to finally win the historic venue’s buckle “It was exciting to win this rodeo. When you’re done and you have titles, I’d like to tell my kids I won the National Western, because I came here when I was a kid. Being from Montana, this was always known as a big time winter rodeo,” he continued. “It was the first big rodeo I’d ever been to on my card and I placed that year and that’s been 13 years ago. I’m just excited and tickled to death to win it.”

Graves was stoked, as well.

“Ever since you were a little kid you want to win this rodeo,” the Oklahoman responded. “It’s a great accomplishment and you get the year started off right. It’s a big deal in my eyes.”

Another big deal was the saddle bronc competition. Boasting solid contestants like JJ Elshere, Jesse Bail, Cody DeMoss and Heith DeMoss battling the heavy artillery of NFR horses Lunatic Fringe, Friendly Fire and Street Smart, the rollicking action didn’t disappoint. With 80 plus scores flashing on the big screen like summer fireworks, the last men standing were brothers Cody and Heith DeMoss.

Older brother Cody got the Coliseum shaking with 83 points aboard Calgary Stampede’s Labeled Money, requiring Heith to post 82 points in order to keep his lead and take the NWSS title for himself. The tension was thick when the gate swung wide and Heith exploded into the arena on a snow-white bucker named Avalanche (another Calgary Stampede mount). The Louisiana cowboy rode the storm for, you guessed it, 82 points and a decibel shattering first place finish by one point over his big brother.

Next up were the Tie Down Ropers, and they weren’t about to let the crowd rest its voice. With a slugger’s lineup boasting Trevor Brazile, Cody Ohl, Mike Johnson, Clint Cooper and Tuf Cooper, it looked like a big name would bag the top prize. The memo didn’t make its way to young guns Cory Solomon and Justin Macha, however, or if it did, the pair of Texas cowboys didn’t let on.

Although Brazile and Clint Cooper showed off respective 8.4 and 8.1 times, Solomon and Macha never flinched. Coming into the championship round in second place, Solomon snared a black calf in 8.2 seconds to show his mettle and get the spectators enthused.

“To rope against those kind of guys is good,” said Solomon about his well-known NWSS contestants. “To put me up against those kind of guys (in a round), it don’t back me down. It actually makes me really step up and get to show my talent.”

Up last to show some talent was Justin Macha, who took the long road into the rodeo through the qualifying rounds and surprised everyone by arriving Sunday on top of the leaderboard. Just like Solomon, Macha delivered an 8.2 second time to win his first NWSS buckle and send the fans into pandemonium.

“Oh gosh, it was great,” said Macha when asked about his win. “Denver’s always a big rodeo and it feels awesome.”

Questioned about the high-energy crowd and the big rodeo atmosphere, Macha had nothing but praise for the historic locale.

“It’s awesome from start to finish,” he said of the rodeo’s feel. “With fireworks getting you pumped up and the crowd, the crowd was great and loud. I love the intensity.”

The intensity kept going into the barrel racing competition. Although nine competitors were ahead of Oklahoma cowgirl Susan Kay Smith, including three-time NWSS winner Brittany Pozzi, Smith blew through the pattern in a 2011 stock show best time of 14.94 seconds. It turned out she needed every bit of that quick time to take home the buckle by only .01 over second place finisher Brenda Mays.

Once the barrels were removed, the music cranked and so did the crowd for the highlight bull riding event. Washington state cowboy Shane Proctor held a tidy lead after winning the first two rounds and was looking for a clean sweep. While three fellow contestants warmed the crowd up with 80 plus point efforts, Proctor brought the house down after scoring 90 points on Calgary Stampede’s Edgar and pocketing a NWSS rodeo best $17,350 for a coveted buckle and a great start to 2011.

“The stock show is always fun to come to,” said Proctor afterward. “It’s one of the highlight rodeos of the year, it’s the one the guys dream of winning. The tradition here is outstanding (and) it’s a great crowd to be in front of.”

Asked to break down his ride, Proctor obliged.

“(It was) a big brindle bull out there rounding left and then back to the right,” he described. “Really showy and fun to ride. He was really rider friendly, which worked out with the way I was leading,” Proctor added. “It was just a fun bull to be on and it was a great draw to have here, especially with the way things worked out.”

Things not only worked out well for Proctor, they worked out well for NWSS officials, who were pleased with 2011’s rodeo showing.

“I thought it was a great, great rodeo performance today,” praised Marvin Witt, NWSS V.P. of Operations. “It’s probably one of the better ones we’ve done. The crowd was electric (and) this old building just rocks. When you sell out like that and you have a performance like that … you can’t ask for much more.”

While it may not be fair to ask for much more, it’s a good bet sell-out crowds will be there next January ready to open another exhilarating Buck Season.

The National Western Stock Show (NWSS) opened Buck Season in 2011, and everyone hunting for chills and thrills left with their bag limit and more during the championship round of rodeo action on Sunday, January 23. Twenty-two energetic PRCA performances led to the climactic final round, leaving 96 cowboys and cowgirls aiming for buckles in eight events and gunning for a piece of that total purse worth over $500,000.

Rock and roll, fireworks and flames introduced the event on a mile high afternoon, with veteran rodeo announcer Boyd Polhamus whipping the crowd into full voice as he described rodeo resume’s and exploits for anyone who could hear over the bedlam inside the Denver Coliseum.

“I love this crowd,” said Polhamus about the loud and enthusiastic fans. “When I say this is the best place to announce a rodeo because the crowd is the most active, I mean it.” Polhamus also summed up the superb action responsible for making the crowds go wild. “(The) NFR horses and the NFR guys, people pay a scalper $400 to sit in a nosebleed seat in (Las Vegas) to watch what we saw here today.”

What they saw was wall-to-wall western excitement; including big names targeting first place while surprising names sniped away for their share of rodeo glory.

A top name managing to bag his goal was Texas bareback rider Will Lowe. Starting the day a few points back, the two-time world champ gunned Calgary Stampede’s Street Dance inside the arena for a score of 89 points and a good shot at weathering the four riders ahead on the card. When young Canadian rider Jake Vold’s initial try for a first place check ended in a re-ride option and then the second rough ride came up short, Lowe had his first place check for the final round and the average. The crowd went nuts, but that was just the beginning.

Although watching bareback riders can make the sport seem like a young man’s game, the steer wrestling action put that notion to rest. With a scorecard bursting at the seams with notables like Branquinho, Gorsuch and Suhn, it was 41-year-old Darrell Petry who brought the assembled throng to its feet. After the veteran Todd Suhn laid down a blistering challenge of 3.9 seconds, Petry arrived four slots later needing a 5.0 time or better to put a Denver title in his crosshairs. The Texan stepped up with 4.7 seconds to pick up a nice check while confirming his decision to make the long trek north.

“This is a great rodeo, but every time I came out here I’ve been in a blizzard, so I was debating on whether or not to come this year,” said Petry after his victory. “So the weather broke in time and I was like, man, it must be a sign, the roads are clear. So I’m glad I made it.”

The crowd was glad he made it, as well, giving the big competitor a standing ovation after his win. The act wasn’t lost on Petry, but in good fun he quibbled over the reason.

“Everybody was like, man, you got a standing ovation,” said Petry with a smile and some laughter. “I was like, that’s when they said I was 41-years-old. That’s why they stood up.”

It wasn’t just steer wrestlers providing entertainment; everyone there had more reasons to stand when the team ropers hit the arena. Outlasting competitors bearing famous last names like Bach and Brazile, Clay Tryan and Travis Graves finally picked up the elusive NWSS title they’d almost grabbed numerous times before. It was an achievement the duo was happy to earn.

“I’ve won second here a couple of times, third, fourth and fifth, but never won it,” began Tryan when asked how it felt to finally win the historic venue’s buckle “It was exciting to win this rodeo. When you’re done and you have titles, I’d like to tell my kids I won the National Western, because I came here when I was a kid. Being from Montana, this was always known as a big time winter rodeo,” he continued. “It was the first big rodeo I’d ever been to on my card and I placed that year and that’s been 13 years ago. I’m just excited and tickled to death to win it.”

Graves was stoked, as well.

“Ever since you were a little kid you want to win this rodeo,” the Oklahoman responded. “It’s a great accomplishment and you get the year started off right. It’s a big deal in my eyes.”

Another big deal was the saddle bronc competition. Boasting solid contestants like JJ Elshere, Jesse Bail, Cody DeMoss and Heith DeMoss battling the heavy artillery of NFR horses Lunatic Fringe, Friendly Fire and Street Smart, the rollicking action didn’t disappoint. With 80 plus scores flashing on the big screen like summer fireworks, the last men standing were brothers Cody and Heith DeMoss.

Older brother Cody got the Coliseum shaking with 83 points aboard Calgary Stampede’s Labeled Money, requiring Heith to post 82 points in order to keep his lead and take the NWSS title for himself. The tension was thick when the gate swung wide and Heith exploded into the arena on a snow-white bucker named Avalanche (another Calgary Stampede mount). The Louisiana cowboy rode the storm for, you guessed it, 82 points and a decibel shattering first place finish by one point over his big brother.

Next up were the Tie Down Ropers, and they weren’t about to let the crowd rest its voice. With a slugger’s lineup boasting Trevor Brazile, Cody Ohl, Mike Johnson, Clint Cooper and Tuf Cooper, it looked like a big name would bag the top prize. The memo didn’t make its way to young guns Cory Solomon and Justin Macha, however, or if it did, the pair of Texas cowboys didn’t let on.

Although Brazile and Clint Cooper showed off respective 8.4 and 8.1 times, Solomon and Macha never flinched. Coming into the championship round in second place, Solomon snared a black calf in 8.2 seconds to show his mettle and get the spectators enthused.

“To rope against those kind of guys is good,” said Solomon about his well-known NWSS contestants. “To put me up against those kind of guys (in a round), it don’t back me down. It actually makes me really step up and get to show my talent.”

Up last to show some talent was Justin Macha, who took the long road into the rodeo through the qualifying rounds and surprised everyone by arriving Sunday on top of the leaderboard. Just like Solomon, Macha delivered an 8.2 second time to win his first NWSS buckle and send the fans into pandemonium.

“Oh gosh, it was great,” said Macha when asked about his win. “Denver’s always a big rodeo and it feels awesome.”

Questioned about the high-energy crowd and the big rodeo atmosphere, Macha had nothing but praise for the historic locale.

“It’s awesome from start to finish,” he said of the rodeo’s feel. “With fireworks getting you pumped up and the crowd, the crowd was great and loud. I love the intensity.”

The intensity kept going into the barrel racing competition. Although nine competitors were ahead of Oklahoma cowgirl Susan Kay Smith, including three-time NWSS winner Brittany Pozzi, Smith blew through the pattern in a 2011 stock show best time of 14.94 seconds. It turned out she needed every bit of that quick time to take home the buckle by only .01 over second place finisher Brenda Mays.

Once the barrels were removed, the music cranked and so did the crowd for the highlight bull riding event. Washington state cowboy Shane Proctor held a tidy lead after winning the first two rounds and was looking for a clean sweep. While three fellow contestants warmed the crowd up with 80 plus point efforts, Proctor brought the house down after scoring 90 points on Calgary Stampede’s Edgar and pocketing a NWSS rodeo best $17,350 for a coveted buckle and a great start to 2011.

“The stock show is always fun to come to,” said Proctor afterward. “It’s one of the highlight rodeos of the year, it’s the one the guys dream of winning. The tradition here is outstanding (and) it’s a great crowd to be in front of.”

Asked to break down his ride, Proctor obliged.

“(It was) a big brindle bull out there rounding left and then back to the right,” he described. “Really showy and fun to ride. He was really rider friendly, which worked out with the way I was leading,” Proctor added. “It was just a fun bull to be on and it was a great draw to have here, especially with the way things worked out.”

Things not only worked out well for Proctor, they worked out well for NWSS officials, who were pleased with 2011’s rodeo showing.

“I thought it was a great, great rodeo performance today,” praised Marvin Witt, NWSS V.P. of Operations. “It’s probably one of the better ones we’ve done. The crowd was electric (and) this old building just rocks. When you sell out like that and you have a performance like that … you can’t ask for much more.”

While it may not be fair to ask for much more, it’s a good bet sell-out crowds will be there next January ready to open another exhilarating Buck Season.