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Rocky Mountain Obituaries

” Many would say that Fred Field took to cowboy’n like a horse takes to oats. The Gunnison Valley lost one of the best cowmen that ever lived on Feb. 21, 2007. Fred was a cattleman, a well-known, popular political figure, but above all, a darned good cowboy. He rode some fine horses, and was never the last one to jerk his rope down. You could say Fred loved a horse from hoof to head. He was a well-respected cattleman and mentor.

Fred died at his ranch near Parlin, Colo. His parents, Tom and Sue Field, established the ranch where Fred grew up. In his younger years, Fred was a gifted athlete, and was on scholarship to attend Colorado State University which was known then as Colorado A&M. Shortly before he was to start school, his brother died in an automobile accident, and Fred stayed home to help his parents on the ranch. Perhaps because he missed opportunity at advanced schooling, education and young people were highly important to Fred Field. All three of his sons went through higher education and have successful professional careers. Fred mentored many other youngsters through ranching as well. To say that Fred was influential to young people would be an understatement.

Fred was first elected to political office in 1981. He served as Gunnison County Commissioner for the next 23 years. People who worked close with him describe him as competent, compassionate and a gentleman. Fred was as true a friend as one could have.

Field is credited with numerous accomplishments during his tenure in county government. Above all, Fred was instrumental in numerous efforts that united factions that long were considered foes: environmentalists and ranchers. Mutual concern over open space and ranch lands landed him respect in both communities. He was heavily involved in the creation of the Gunnison Valley Land Preservation Fund and the Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Legacy Program. Fred stepped down from the board in 2004, but remained active in local affairs.

Fred’s health began to deteriorate over the past few years, but was hidden by his intense drive for life. Not long after doctors prescribed him to be on oxygen, he had a custom set of saddle bags made in order to carry the bottles with him horseback while checking his cows.

Fred Field was laid to rest Monday, Feb. 26. He leaves behind a community of family and friends.

Special thanks to Chris Dickey, Gunnison Country Times, and friends & family for the content of this obituary.

” Many would say that Fred Field took to cowboy’n like a horse takes to oats. The Gunnison Valley lost one of the best cowmen that ever lived on Feb. 21, 2007. Fred was a cattleman, a well-known, popular political figure, but above all, a darned good cowboy. He rode some fine horses, and was never the last one to jerk his rope down. You could say Fred loved a horse from hoof to head. He was a well-respected cattleman and mentor.

Fred died at his ranch near Parlin, Colo. His parents, Tom and Sue Field, established the ranch where Fred grew up. In his younger years, Fred was a gifted athlete, and was on scholarship to attend Colorado State University which was known then as Colorado A&M. Shortly before he was to start school, his brother died in an automobile accident, and Fred stayed home to help his parents on the ranch. Perhaps because he missed opportunity at advanced schooling, education and young people were highly important to Fred Field. All three of his sons went through higher education and have successful professional careers. Fred mentored many other youngsters through ranching as well. To say that Fred was influential to young people would be an understatement.

Fred was first elected to political office in 1981. He served as Gunnison County Commissioner for the next 23 years. People who worked close with him describe him as competent, compassionate and a gentleman. Fred was as true a friend as one could have.

Field is credited with numerous accomplishments during his tenure in county government. Above all, Fred was instrumental in numerous efforts that united factions that long were considered foes: environmentalists and ranchers. Mutual concern over open space and ranch lands landed him respect in both communities. He was heavily involved in the creation of the Gunnison Valley Land Preservation Fund and the Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Legacy Program. Fred stepped down from the board in 2004, but remained active in local affairs.

Fred’s health began to deteriorate over the past few years, but was hidden by his intense drive for life. Not long after doctors prescribed him to be on oxygen, he had a custom set of saddle bags made in order to carry the bottles with him horseback while checking his cows.

Fred Field was laid to rest Monday, Feb. 26. He leaves behind a community of family and friends.

Special thanks to Chris Dickey, Gunnison Country Times, and friends & family for the content of this obituary.

” Many would say that Fred Field took to cowboy’n like a horse takes to oats. The Gunnison Valley lost one of the best cowmen that ever lived on Feb. 21, 2007. Fred was a cattleman, a well-known, popular political figure, but above all, a darned good cowboy. He rode some fine horses, and was never the last one to jerk his rope down. You could say Fred loved a horse from hoof to head. He was a well-respected cattleman and mentor.

Fred died at his ranch near Parlin, Colo. His parents, Tom and Sue Field, established the ranch where Fred grew up. In his younger years, Fred was a gifted athlete, and was on scholarship to attend Colorado State University which was known then as Colorado A&M. Shortly before he was to start school, his brother died in an automobile accident, and Fred stayed home to help his parents on the ranch. Perhaps because he missed opportunity at advanced schooling, education and young people were highly important to Fred Field. All three of his sons went through higher education and have successful professional careers. Fred mentored many other youngsters through ranching as well. To say that Fred was influential to young people would be an understatement.

Fred was first elected to political office in 1981. He served as Gunnison County Commissioner for the next 23 years. People who worked close with him describe him as competent, compassionate and a gentleman. Fred was as true a friend as one could have.

Field is credited with numerous accomplishments during his tenure in county government. Above all, Fred was instrumental in numerous efforts that united factions that long were considered foes: environmentalists and ranchers. Mutual concern over open space and ranch lands landed him respect in both communities. He was heavily involved in the creation of the Gunnison Valley Land Preservation Fund and the Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Legacy Program. Fred stepped down from the board in 2004, but remained active in local affairs.

Fred’s health began to deteriorate over the past few years, but was hidden by his intense drive for life. Not long after doctors prescribed him to be on oxygen, he had a custom set of saddle bags made in order to carry the bottles with him horseback while checking his cows.

Fred Field was laid to rest Monday, Feb. 26. He leaves behind a community of family and friends.

Special thanks to Chris Dickey, Gunnison Country Times, and friends & family for the content of this obituary.

” Many would say that Fred Field took to cowboy’n like a horse takes to oats. The Gunnison Valley lost one of the best cowmen that ever lived on Feb. 21, 2007. Fred was a cattleman, a well-known, popular political figure, but above all, a darned good cowboy. He rode some fine horses, and was never the last one to jerk his rope down. You could say Fred loved a horse from hoof to head. He was a well-respected cattleman and mentor.

Fred died at his ranch near Parlin, Colo. His parents, Tom and Sue Field, established the ranch where Fred grew up. In his younger years, Fred was a gifted athlete, and was on scholarship to attend Colorado State University which was known then as Colorado A&M. Shortly before he was to start school, his brother died in an automobile accident, and Fred stayed home to help his parents on the ranch. Perhaps because he missed opportunity at advanced schooling, education and young people were highly important to Fred Field. All three of his sons went through higher education and have successful professional careers. Fred mentored many other youngsters through ranching as well. To say that Fred was influential to young people would be an understatement.

Fred was first elected to political office in 1981. He served as Gunnison County Commissioner for the next 23 years. People who worked close with him describe him as competent, compassionate and a gentleman. Fred was as true a friend as one could have.

Field is credited with numerous accomplishments during his tenure in county government. Above all, Fred was instrumental in numerous efforts that united factions that long were considered foes: environmentalists and ranchers. Mutual concern over open space and ranch lands landed him respect in both communities. He was heavily involved in the creation of the Gunnison Valley Land Preservation Fund and the Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Legacy Program. Fred stepped down from the board in 2004, but remained active in local affairs.

Fred’s health began to deteriorate over the past few years, but was hidden by his intense drive for life. Not long after doctors prescribed him to be on oxygen, he had a custom set of saddle bags made in order to carry the bottles with him horseback while checking his cows.

Fred Field was laid to rest Monday, Feb. 26. He leaves behind a community of family and friends.

Special thanks to Chris Dickey, Gunnison Country Times, and friends & family for the content of this obituary.


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