Octogenarian relives childhood at Boulder Fair | TheFencePost.com
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Octogenarian relives childhood at Boulder Fair

Kitty Michelotti-Glaser
Fence Post Staff Reporter

The whirr of the 1907 Case steam engine was unmistakable. The canvas belt that connected it to the 1926 Bellville thresher was 75 feet long and weighed in at over 150 pounds. But that wasn’t what caught his eye. It was the 1938 Case that was belt powering the 1922 International hay press that sparked fond memories.

“It was 90 years ago ” not too long. My job was to bring water to the horses and the hands working in the field with my father,” said Cole Kugel. Named after the famous bank robber “Cole Younger,” Cole was born in Oklahoma in 1902 when it was still Indian territory. He remembered working with machines just like the ones on display at the Yesteryear Farm and Home Show at the Boulder County Fair. Cole would pump the water out of a pond and into a portable tank pulled by two horses. He would also bring drinking water with him. At the age of 14, Cole’s job was to pump the water into the steam engine and keep it filled to prevent it from “blowing up.”

The whirr of the 1907 Case steam engine was unmistakable. The canvas belt that connected it to the 1926 Bellville thresher was 75 feet long and weighed in at over 150 pounds. But that wasn’t what caught his eye. It was the 1938 Case that was belt powering the 1922 International hay press that sparked fond memories.

“It was 90 years ago ” not too long. My job was to bring water to the horses and the hands working in the field with my father,” said Cole Kugel. Named after the famous bank robber “Cole Younger,” Cole was born in Oklahoma in 1902 when it was still Indian territory. He remembered working with machines just like the ones on display at the Yesteryear Farm and Home Show at the Boulder County Fair. Cole would pump the water out of a pond and into a portable tank pulled by two horses. He would also bring drinking water with him. At the age of 14, Cole’s job was to pump the water into the steam engine and keep it filled to prevent it from “blowing up.”


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