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Oklahoma team claims the WRCA gold

Bert Entwistle
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Bert EntwistleEverett Ashurst of the Hatchet Ranch shows some a little classic saddle bronc form.

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The Sweetwater and Drummond team took gold buckles, saddles and many more great prizes back home to Oklahoma for their first ever Working Ranch Cowboys Association world championship. From Nov. 12-15, 24 qualified teams, representing 38 ranches from nine states, spent four days in Amarillo, Texas, battling it out for the top spot. Five events, including ranch bronc riding, stray gathering, team penning, wild cow milking and branding showed off many of the best cowboys and cowgirls in the business.

The show opened with a tribute to women in ranching and a special performance by Baxter Black. Black called on his veterinary experience to explain the simple way to fix a uterine prolapse – with his head – and why his 30-foot rope was always a foot too short. The ranching crowd loved it and was still laughing the next day.

The bucking horses were provided by PRCA and Colorado legend Harry Vold and proved to be even more outstanding than usual. This year’s wild milking cows lived up to their title and shot out of the gate like demons possessed ready to take on any cowboy that dared come her way. The action was nonstop, with cows charging horses and routinely running over the cowboys. In one case, a big mama cow stalked and ran down the one milker from behind – just short of the finish line. No cowboys or cows were injured during the finals – but there were more than enough injured egos to go around.

The Sweetwater Cattle and Tom Drummond Ranch team is out of Foracker and Pawhuska, Okla. The outfits run yearlings and mama cows over many locations in Oklahoma, and are committed to the traditions and legacy of the real working cowboy. The team won not only a round of penning and one of branding, but also won both rounds of the milking – something tough for any team to do at any rodeo.

This year’s reserve spot went to the Bradley J3 Ranch and Veale Ranch team out of Electra and Aledo, Texas. The Bradly J3 Ranch was established in 1877 by Rufus Jack Bradley and is now being worked by fourth and fifth generation family members.

An event that is rapidly gaining popularity is the stray gathering. Two steers are turned out and four mounted cowboys each swinging a rope try to team rope the steers and tie three legs to keep them tied for six seconds. On occasion, the scene looks like something old Charley Russell might have painted right there in the arena. This year, the Tongue River Ranch put on a “How Not To Do It” clinic for 5,000 fans. After one steer was roped it crossed lines with another steer already tied on by the head. That rope ran up under the tail of a horse and the rodeo was on.

After a few minutes of riders, cows, horses, cowboys, judges (and one photographer) looking for safety, some brave cowboy finally got close enough to cut the rope. If Charley Russell was looking down on this, he’d surly be wishing he had a pencil and paper.

The ranch bronc title went to Brad Shadel, riding for the Meyers Cattle Company and Mimms Cattle Company team out of Claude and Hereford, Texas. Shadel covered his two head for 75 and 83-point scores. This year’s third spot went to the Wilson Cattle and T4 Cattle Company out of Hereford, Texas. Wilson won the stray gathering event.

Each year the WRCA gives out several individual awards, including Top Horse and Top Hand as well as the Top AQHA American Quarter Horse from the AQHA. This Year, the WRCA Top Horse was won by “Four Little Smart” owned and shown by Craig Haythorn. The team also claimed the Top AQHA American Quarter Horse award. Texas hand Riley Smith won the prestigious WRCA Top Hand award. Smith, a member of the Sandhill Cattle Company team is partner in the Sandhill business and lives in Earth, Texas, with his wife Tori and daughter Scout.

For the second year, the WRCA held a youth ranch horse show with a Junior and Senior class. This year the Junior Class was claimed by Wesley Gudgell from Logan, N.M, riding “Spider.” The Senior Class was won by Quincy Carolton, out of Happy, Texas, showing “Coyotes Barman.”

Each year the WRCA puts on a Ranch Horse Show sanctioned by the Ranch Horse Association of America (RHAA) in conjunction with the finals. This years overall winner was Tripp Townsend, from Earth, Texas. Townsend rode his 2002 bay gelding “Heza Jewell Cat” to the title.

The real purpose for the founding of the WRCA was to bring attention to the cause of the working cowboy and to generate income for the Working Ranch Cowboys Foundation (WRCF). The foundation is run to provide scholarships for ranch families and maintain a crises fund for those in need. This year more than $39,000 in scholarships went to 33 recipients.

Randy Whipple, WRCA president and WRCF secretary, says that everyone was very excited about this years show. “The rodeo was the biggest ever,” he said. “Support for the WRCA is at a new height and we’re very proud of what the ranching community is doing for its own. Once the dust settles, the proceeds will be dispersed via the scholarship and crises funds. We’re expecting the foundation to grow by more than $100,000 because of the ’09 World Championships.”

The Sweetwater and Drummond team travels with a large fan club and you could hear them still cheering as they drove out of the parking lot pointed towards Oklahoma. Everyone says this was the best WRCA show ever. Watch for the WRCA coming to a venue near you this summer and see for yourself what the cheering is all about.

The Sweetwater and Drummond team took gold buckles, saddles and many more great prizes back home to Oklahoma for their first ever Working Ranch Cowboys Association world championship. From Nov. 12-15, 24 qualified teams, representing 38 ranches from nine states, spent four days in Amarillo, Texas, battling it out for the top spot. Five events, including ranch bronc riding, stray gathering, team penning, wild cow milking and branding showed off many of the best cowboys and cowgirls in the business.

The show opened with a tribute to women in ranching and a special performance by Baxter Black. Black called on his veterinary experience to explain the simple way to fix a uterine prolapse – with his head – and why his 30-foot rope was always a foot too short. The ranching crowd loved it and was still laughing the next day.

The bucking horses were provided by PRCA and Colorado legend Harry Vold and proved to be even more outstanding than usual. This year’s wild milking cows lived up to their title and shot out of the gate like demons possessed ready to take on any cowboy that dared come her way. The action was nonstop, with cows charging horses and routinely running over the cowboys. In one case, a big mama cow stalked and ran down the one milker from behind – just short of the finish line. No cowboys or cows were injured during the finals – but there were more than enough injured egos to go around.

The Sweetwater Cattle and Tom Drummond Ranch team is out of Foracker and Pawhuska, Okla. The outfits run yearlings and mama cows over many locations in Oklahoma, and are committed to the traditions and legacy of the real working cowboy. The team won not only a round of penning and one of branding, but also won both rounds of the milking – something tough for any team to do at any rodeo.

This year’s reserve spot went to the Bradley J3 Ranch and Veale Ranch team out of Electra and Aledo, Texas. The Bradly J3 Ranch was established in 1877 by Rufus Jack Bradley and is now being worked by fourth and fifth generation family members.

An event that is rapidly gaining popularity is the stray gathering. Two steers are turned out and four mounted cowboys each swinging a rope try to team rope the steers and tie three legs to keep them tied for six seconds. On occasion, the scene looks like something old Charley Russell might have painted right there in the arena. This year, the Tongue River Ranch put on a “How Not To Do It” clinic for 5,000 fans. After one steer was roped it crossed lines with another steer already tied on by the head. That rope ran up under the tail of a horse and the rodeo was on.

After a few minutes of riders, cows, horses, cowboys, judges (and one photographer) looking for safety, some brave cowboy finally got close enough to cut the rope. If Charley Russell was looking down on this, he’d surly be wishing he had a pencil and paper.

The ranch bronc title went to Brad Shadel, riding for the Meyers Cattle Company and Mimms Cattle Company team out of Claude and Hereford, Texas. Shadel covered his two head for 75 and 83-point scores. This year’s third spot went to the Wilson Cattle and T4 Cattle Company out of Hereford, Texas. Wilson won the stray gathering event.

Each year the WRCA gives out several individual awards, including Top Horse and Top Hand as well as the Top AQHA American Quarter Horse from the AQHA. This Year, the WRCA Top Horse was won by “Four Little Smart” owned and shown by Craig Haythorn. The team also claimed the Top AQHA American Quarter Horse award. Texas hand Riley Smith won the prestigious WRCA Top Hand award. Smith, a member of the Sandhill Cattle Company team is partner in the Sandhill business and lives in Earth, Texas, with his wife Tori and daughter Scout.

For the second year, the WRCA held a youth ranch horse show with a Junior and Senior class. This year the Junior Class was claimed by Wesley Gudgell from Logan, N.M, riding “Spider.” The Senior Class was won by Quincy Carolton, out of Happy, Texas, showing “Coyotes Barman.”

Each year the WRCA puts on a Ranch Horse Show sanctioned by the Ranch Horse Association of America (RHAA) in conjunction with the finals. This years overall winner was Tripp Townsend, from Earth, Texas. Townsend rode his 2002 bay gelding “Heza Jewell Cat” to the title.

The real purpose for the founding of the WRCA was to bring attention to the cause of the working cowboy and to generate income for the Working Ranch Cowboys Foundation (WRCF). The foundation is run to provide scholarships for ranch families and maintain a crises fund for those in need. This year more than $39,000 in scholarships went to 33 recipients.

Randy Whipple, WRCA president and WRCF secretary, says that everyone was very excited about this years show. “The rodeo was the biggest ever,” he said. “Support for the WRCA is at a new height and we’re very proud of what the ranching community is doing for its own. Once the dust settles, the proceeds will be dispersed via the scholarship and crises funds. We’re expecting the foundation to grow by more than $100,000 because of the ’09 World Championships.”

The Sweetwater and Drummond team travels with a large fan club and you could hear them still cheering as they drove out of the parking lot pointed towards Oklahoma. Everyone says this was the best WRCA show ever. Watch for the WRCA coming to a venue near you this summer and see for yourself what the cheering is all about.

The Sweetwater and Drummond team took gold buckles, saddles and many more great prizes back home to Oklahoma for their first ever Working Ranch Cowboys Association world championship. From Nov. 12-15, 24 qualified teams, representing 38 ranches from nine states, spent four days in Amarillo, Texas, battling it out for the top spot. Five events, including ranch bronc riding, stray gathering, team penning, wild cow milking and branding showed off many of the best cowboys and cowgirls in the business.

The show opened with a tribute to women in ranching and a special performance by Baxter Black. Black called on his veterinary experience to explain the simple way to fix a uterine prolapse – with his head – and why his 30-foot rope was always a foot too short. The ranching crowd loved it and was still laughing the next day.

The bucking horses were provided by PRCA and Colorado legend Harry Vold and proved to be even more outstanding than usual. This year’s wild milking cows lived up to their title and shot out of the gate like demons possessed ready to take on any cowboy that dared come her way. The action was nonstop, with cows charging horses and routinely running over the cowboys. In one case, a big mama cow stalked and ran down the one milker from behind – just short of the finish line. No cowboys or cows were injured during the finals – but there were more than enough injured egos to go around.

The Sweetwater Cattle and Tom Drummond Ranch team is out of Foracker and Pawhuska, Okla. The outfits run yearlings and mama cows over many locations in Oklahoma, and are committed to the traditions and legacy of the real working cowboy. The team won not only a round of penning and one of branding, but also won both rounds of the milking – something tough for any team to do at any rodeo.

This year’s reserve spot went to the Bradley J3 Ranch and Veale Ranch team out of Electra and Aledo, Texas. The Bradly J3 Ranch was established in 1877 by Rufus Jack Bradley and is now being worked by fourth and fifth generation family members.

An event that is rapidly gaining popularity is the stray gathering. Two steers are turned out and four mounted cowboys each swinging a rope try to team rope the steers and tie three legs to keep them tied for six seconds. On occasion, the scene looks like something old Charley Russell might have painted right there in the arena. This year, the Tongue River Ranch put on a “How Not To Do It” clinic for 5,000 fans. After one steer was roped it crossed lines with another steer already tied on by the head. That rope ran up under the tail of a horse and the rodeo was on.

After a few minutes of riders, cows, horses, cowboys, judges (and one photographer) looking for safety, some brave cowboy finally got close enough to cut the rope. If Charley Russell was looking down on this, he’d surly be wishing he had a pencil and paper.

The ranch bronc title went to Brad Shadel, riding for the Meyers Cattle Company and Mimms Cattle Company team out of Claude and Hereford, Texas. Shadel covered his two head for 75 and 83-point scores. This year’s third spot went to the Wilson Cattle and T4 Cattle Company out of Hereford, Texas. Wilson won the stray gathering event.

Each year the WRCA gives out several individual awards, including Top Horse and Top Hand as well as the Top AQHA American Quarter Horse from the AQHA. This Year, the WRCA Top Horse was won by “Four Little Smart” owned and shown by Craig Haythorn. The team also claimed the Top AQHA American Quarter Horse award. Texas hand Riley Smith won the prestigious WRCA Top Hand award. Smith, a member of the Sandhill Cattle Company team is partner in the Sandhill business and lives in Earth, Texas, with his wife Tori and daughter Scout.

For the second year, the WRCA held a youth ranch horse show with a Junior and Senior class. This year the Junior Class was claimed by Wesley Gudgell from Logan, N.M, riding “Spider.” The Senior Class was won by Quincy Carolton, out of Happy, Texas, showing “Coyotes Barman.”

Each year the WRCA puts on a Ranch Horse Show sanctioned by the Ranch Horse Association of America (RHAA) in conjunction with the finals. This years overall winner was Tripp Townsend, from Earth, Texas. Townsend rode his 2002 bay gelding “Heza Jewell Cat” to the title.

The real purpose for the founding of the WRCA was to bring attention to the cause of the working cowboy and to generate income for the Working Ranch Cowboys Foundation (WRCF). The foundation is run to provide scholarships for ranch families and maintain a crises fund for those in need. This year more than $39,000 in scholarships went to 33 recipients.

Randy Whipple, WRCA president and WRCF secretary, says that everyone was very excited about this years show. “The rodeo was the biggest ever,” he said. “Support for the WRCA is at a new height and we’re very proud of what the ranching community is doing for its own. Once the dust settles, the proceeds will be dispersed via the scholarship and crises funds. We’re expecting the foundation to grow by more than $100,000 because of the ’09 World Championships.”

The Sweetwater and Drummond team travels with a large fan club and you could hear them still cheering as they drove out of the parking lot pointed towards Oklahoma. Everyone says this was the best WRCA show ever. Watch for the WRCA coming to a venue near you this summer and see for yourself what the cheering is all about.

The Sweetwater and Drummond team took gold buckles, saddles and many more great prizes back home to Oklahoma for their first ever Working Ranch Cowboys Association world championship. From Nov. 12-15, 24 qualified teams, representing 38 ranches from nine states, spent four days in Amarillo, Texas, battling it out for the top spot. Five events, including ranch bronc riding, stray gathering, team penning, wild cow milking and branding showed off many of the best cowboys and cowgirls in the business.

The show opened with a tribute to women in ranching and a special performance by Baxter Black. Black called on his veterinary experience to explain the simple way to fix a uterine prolapse – with his head – and why his 30-foot rope was always a foot too short. The ranching crowd loved it and was still laughing the next day.

The bucking horses were provided by PRCA and Colorado legend Harry Vold and proved to be even more outstanding than usual. This year’s wild milking cows lived up to their title and shot out of the gate like demons possessed ready to take on any cowboy that dared come her way. The action was nonstop, with cows charging horses and routinely running over the cowboys. In one case, a big mama cow stalked and ran down the one milker from behind – just short of the finish line. No cowboys or cows were injured during the finals – but there were more than enough injured egos to go around.

The Sweetwater Cattle and Tom Drummond Ranch team is out of Foracker and Pawhuska, Okla. The outfits run yearlings and mama cows over many locations in Oklahoma, and are committed to the traditions and legacy of the real working cowboy. The team won not only a round of penning and one of branding, but also won both rounds of the milking – something tough for any team to do at any rodeo.

This year’s reserve spot went to the Bradley J3 Ranch and Veale Ranch team out of Electra and Aledo, Texas. The Bradly J3 Ranch was established in 1877 by Rufus Jack Bradley and is now being worked by fourth and fifth generation family members.

An event that is rapidly gaining popularity is the stray gathering. Two steers are turned out and four mounted cowboys each swinging a rope try to team rope the steers and tie three legs to keep them tied for six seconds. On occasion, the scene looks like something old Charley Russell might have painted right there in the arena. This year, the Tongue River Ranch put on a “How Not To Do It” clinic for 5,000 fans. After one steer was roped it crossed lines with another steer already tied on by the head. That rope ran up under the tail of a horse and the rodeo was on.

After a few minutes of riders, cows, horses, cowboys, judges (and one photographer) looking for safety, some brave cowboy finally got close enough to cut the rope. If Charley Russell was looking down on this, he’d surly be wishing he had a pencil and paper.

The ranch bronc title went to Brad Shadel, riding for the Meyers Cattle Company and Mimms Cattle Company team out of Claude and Hereford, Texas. Shadel covered his two head for 75 and 83-point scores. This year’s third spot went to the Wilson Cattle and T4 Cattle Company out of Hereford, Texas. Wilson won the stray gathering event.

Each year the WRCA gives out several individual awards, including Top Horse and Top Hand as well as the Top AQHA American Quarter Horse from the AQHA. This Year, the WRCA Top Horse was won by “Four Little Smart” owned and shown by Craig Haythorn. The team also claimed the Top AQHA American Quarter Horse award. Texas hand Riley Smith won the prestigious WRCA Top Hand award. Smith, a member of the Sandhill Cattle Company team is partner in the Sandhill business and lives in Earth, Texas, with his wife Tori and daughter Scout.

For the second year, the WRCA held a youth ranch horse show with a Junior and Senior class. This year the Junior Class was claimed by Wesley Gudgell from Logan, N.M, riding “Spider.” The Senior Class was won by Quincy Carolton, out of Happy, Texas, showing “Coyotes Barman.”

Each year the WRCA puts on a Ranch Horse Show sanctioned by the Ranch Horse Association of America (RHAA) in conjunction with the finals. This years overall winner was Tripp Townsend, from Earth, Texas. Townsend rode his 2002 bay gelding “Heza Jewell Cat” to the title.

The real purpose for the founding of the WRCA was to bring attention to the cause of the working cowboy and to generate income for the Working Ranch Cowboys Foundation (WRCF). The foundation is run to provide scholarships for ranch families and maintain a crises fund for those in need. This year more than $39,000 in scholarships went to 33 recipients.

Randy Whipple, WRCA president and WRCF secretary, says that everyone was very excited about this years show. “The rodeo was the biggest ever,” he said. “Support for the WRCA is at a new height and we’re very proud of what the ranching community is doing for its own. Once the dust settles, the proceeds will be dispersed via the scholarship and crises funds. We’re expecting the foundation to grow by more than $100,000 because of the ’09 World Championships.”

The Sweetwater and Drummond team travels with a large fan club and you could hear them still cheering as they drove out of the parking lot pointed towards Oklahoma. Everyone says this was the best WRCA show ever. Watch for the WRCA coming to a venue near you this summer and see for yourself what the cheering is all about.

The Sweetwater and Drummond team took gold buckles, saddles and many more great prizes back home to Oklahoma for their first ever Working Ranch Cowboys Association world championship. From Nov. 12-15, 24 qualified teams, representing 38 ranches from nine states, spent four days in Amarillo, Texas, battling it out for the top spot. Five events, including ranch bronc riding, stray gathering, team penning, wild cow milking and branding showed off many of the best cowboys and cowgirls in the business.

The show opened with a tribute to women in ranching and a special performance by Baxter Black. Black called on his veterinary experience to explain the simple way to fix a uterine prolapse – with his head – and why his 30-foot rope was always a foot too short. The ranching crowd loved it and was still laughing the next day.

The bucking horses were provided by PRCA and Colorado legend Harry Vold and proved to be even more outstanding than usual. This year’s wild milking cows lived up to their title and shot out of the gate like demons possessed ready to take on any cowboy that dared come her way. The action was nonstop, with cows charging horses and routinely running over the cowboys. In one case, a big mama cow stalked and ran down the one milker from behind – just short of the finish line. No cowboys or cows were injured during the finals – but there were more than enough injured egos to go around.

The Sweetwater Cattle and Tom Drummond Ranch team is out of Foracker and Pawhuska, Okla. The outfits run yearlings and mama cows over many locations in Oklahoma, and are committed to the traditions and legacy of the real working cowboy. The team won not only a round of penning and one of branding, but also won both rounds of the milking – something tough for any team to do at any rodeo.

This year’s reserve spot went to the Bradley J3 Ranch and Veale Ranch team out of Electra and Aledo, Texas. The Bradly J3 Ranch was established in 1877 by Rufus Jack Bradley and is now being worked by fourth and fifth generation family members.

An event that is rapidly gaining popularity is the stray gathering. Two steers are turned out and four mounted cowboys each swinging a rope try to team rope the steers and tie three legs to keep them tied for six seconds. On occasion, the scene looks like something old Charley Russell might have painted right there in the arena. This year, the Tongue River Ranch put on a “How Not To Do It” clinic for 5,000 fans. After one steer was roped it crossed lines with another steer already tied on by the head. That rope ran up under the tail of a horse and the rodeo was on.

After a few minutes of riders, cows, horses, cowboys, judges (and one photographer) looking for safety, some brave cowboy finally got close enough to cut the rope. If Charley Russell was looking down on this, he’d surly be wishing he had a pencil and paper.

The ranch bronc title went to Brad Shadel, riding for the Meyers Cattle Company and Mimms Cattle Company team out of Claude and Hereford, Texas. Shadel covered his two head for 75 and 83-point scores. This year’s third spot went to the Wilson Cattle and T4 Cattle Company out of Hereford, Texas. Wilson won the stray gathering event.

Each year the WRCA gives out several individual awards, including Top Horse and Top Hand as well as the Top AQHA American Quarter Horse from the AQHA. This Year, the WRCA Top Horse was won by “Four Little Smart” owned and shown by Craig Haythorn. The team also claimed the Top AQHA American Quarter Horse award. Texas hand Riley Smith won the prestigious WRCA Top Hand award. Smith, a member of the Sandhill Cattle Company team is partner in the Sandhill business and lives in Earth, Texas, with his wife Tori and daughter Scout.

For the second year, the WRCA held a youth ranch horse show with a Junior and Senior class. This year the Junior Class was claimed by Wesley Gudgell from Logan, N.M, riding “Spider.” The Senior Class was won by Quincy Carolton, out of Happy, Texas, showing “Coyotes Barman.”

Each year the WRCA puts on a Ranch Horse Show sanctioned by the Ranch Horse Association of America (RHAA) in conjunction with the finals. This years overall winner was Tripp Townsend, from Earth, Texas. Townsend rode his 2002 bay gelding “Heza Jewell Cat” to the title.

The real purpose for the founding of the WRCA was to bring attention to the cause of the working cowboy and to generate income for the Working Ranch Cowboys Foundation (WRCF). The foundation is run to provide scholarships for ranch families and maintain a crises fund for those in need. This year more than $39,000 in scholarships went to 33 recipients.

Randy Whipple, WRCA president and WRCF secretary, says that everyone was very excited about this years show. “The rodeo was the biggest ever,” he said. “Support for the WRCA is at a new height and we’re very proud of what the ranching community is doing for its own. Once the dust settles, the proceeds will be dispersed via the scholarship and crises funds. We’re expecting the foundation to grow by more than $100,000 because of the ’09 World Championships.”

The Sweetwater and Drummond team travels with a large fan club and you could hear them still cheering as they drove out of the parking lot pointed towards Oklahoma. Everyone says this was the best WRCA show ever. Watch for the WRCA coming to a venue near you this summer and see for yourself what the cheering is all about.


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