One hundred years of excellence | TheFencePost.com

One hundred years of excellence

by Jo Chytka
Hemingford, Neb.

Colorado State University’s (CSU) College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences is celebrating its centennial landmark this year. At the end of March the CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital held their 28th annual Open House which was free and open to the public. The two-day event was attended by an estimated 12,000 people with roughly 60 percent being children and the balance adults.

There were many lectures and demonstrations to choose from with a steady crowd both days. Lectures covered such subjects as: equine medicine; exotic animal medicine; so you want to be a veterinarian; banishing animal pain; acupuncture for animals; a look at animal training and pet hospice. Demonstrations which were very well attended included: dog agility; saddle fitting; animal trick training and bird behavior that spanned the Friday and Saturday event. Additional activities included guided tours of the teaching hospital, student organization exhibits, petting zoo and mock surgeries where children of all ages could pretend to be a surgeon.

Debby Morehead, Associate Director, Development/Alumni Relations said, “The mock surgery is always the favorite activity for the kids, as well as the petting zoo and this year the animal balloons were also a big hit.”

Each tour of the teaching hospital had different numbers of participants and was led by a veterinary student. Well over 70 tours were given over the two-day period. A tour lasted roughly an hour and wound through both the large and small animal facilities. Visited were rooms for anesthesia, surgery and recovery which showcased equipment and techniques of veterinary medicine. Information was dispensed on everything from endoscopies, oncology, dentistry, hydrotherapy, and differing physiology of exotic animals to virology, nuclear medicine, pathology and diagnostic laboratories and their contributions to animal as well as human health.

Student guides also fielded many questions throughout their tours. All up and down the hallways tables were set up with displays and information as well as walls being covered with demonstrative photos and by the necropsy area, samples of items found in animals that directly or indirectly led to the animal’s illness and/or demise.

Colorado State University’s (CSU) College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences is celebrating its centennial landmark this year. At the end of March the CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital held their 28th annual Open House which was free and open to the public. The two-day event was attended by an estimated 12,000 people with roughly 60 percent being children and the balance adults.

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There were many lectures and demonstrations to choose from with a steady crowd both days. Lectures covered such subjects as: equine medicine; exotic animal medicine; so you want to be a veterinarian; banishing animal pain; acupuncture for animals; a look at animal training and pet hospice. Demonstrations which were very well attended included: dog agility; saddle fitting; animal trick training and bird behavior that spanned the Friday and Saturday event. Additional activities included guided tours of the teaching hospital, student organization exhibits, petting zoo and mock surgeries where children of all ages could pretend to be a surgeon.

Debby Morehead, Associate Director, Development/Alumni Relations said, “The mock surgery is always the favorite activity for the kids, as well as the petting zoo and this year the animal balloons were also a big hit.”

Each tour of the teaching hospital had different numbers of participants and was led by a veterinary student. Well over 70 tours were given over the two-day period. A tour lasted roughly an hour and wound through both the large and small animal facilities. Visited were rooms for anesthesia, surgery and recovery which showcased equipment and techniques of veterinary medicine. Information was dispensed on everything from endoscopies, oncology, dentistry, hydrotherapy, and differing physiology of exotic animals to virology, nuclear medicine, pathology and diagnostic laboratories and their contributions to animal as well as human health.

Student guides also fielded many questions throughout their tours. All up and down the hallways tables were set up with displays and information as well as walls being covered with demonstrative photos and by the necropsy area, samples of items found in animals that directly or indirectly led to the animal’s illness and/or demise.