One man makes "mush" history | TheFencePost.com

One man makes "mush" history

Leslie Fields
Loveland, Colo.

Racers come out of the starting chute onto the trail at minute intervals.

When I first tell someone I’m a musher, they usually give me a rather odd look followed with some comment like “I didn’t know there were sled dogs in Colorado; do you go to Alaska often?” It seems to be a common misconception that sled dogs are only found in the far north. I explain to them that there are indeed lots of sled dogs and races in our region, but generally I spare them the whole history of Colorado sled dogs.

Colorado does not have a long history of flashy French-Canadian fur trappers, hardy Eskimos, rowdy gold miners or proud Canadian Mounties traveling the countryside by dog team. World War II was on when sled dogs entered the scene in Colorado. It had been determined that dogs could help with the war as sentry, messenger, pack and sled dogs. A program called “Dogs for Defense” was formed where citizens across the country could donate their canines for military service. The initial estimates of 200 dogs needed was way, way low. By the end of the war over 10,000 animals had joined the troops and dogs still serve military duty today.

Local sled dog history started with a young man in the military. He was assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, an alpine unit training for the especially challenging winter wartime conditions. The 2nd lieutenant was in a rather awkward position since as a conscientious objector he didn’t want to bears arms against fellow mankind. When called to his superior’s office, this young soldier was really concerned what might become of him. The summons was only to give him his next assignment – head of the newly formed sled dog patrol. A botanist by training, Stuart Mace had no previous experience with huskies. Several good dog men that had worked in Alaska, New England and the Antarctic were to become his advisers for this unusual assignment.

In 1942 the 10th Mountain Division was training at Camp Hale, near Leadville, Colo. Their foundation mission was to train for a planned invasion of Norway. This location was ideal for training sled dogs with its altitude, geography and extreme winter conditions. Any musher that has been to Camp Hale knows well how great the snow can be and how miserable the weather can get! Today little remains at the site of Camp Hale, along Highway 24 overlooking the valley, a roadside marker gives a brief history of the former military camp.

Dogs to be trained were shipped to Camp Hale, Colo., and Camp Rimini, Mont., from all points. Railroad was the usual mode of transportation. Dogs were often left loose in the box cars for exercise on the long journey. Some dogs came from the east where sled dog racing was popular, others came in from the Alaska territory. Malamute and husky type dogs were still fairly uncommon in the United States so lacking suitable donations, some native dogs were purchased or traded for and shipped in from Canada and the northern regions.

With no experience or manual to guide him, Stuart plunged into the task of training men and dogs to become teams ready to supply isolated battalions and remove injured soldiers from the front lines. Everything had to be reinvented for military needs. Renowned sled builder and former musher with Admiral Byrd, Ed Moody helped design and build specialized sleds. Efficient harnesses and ganglines were tested and developed. The few experienced mushers helped with the training of the teams. Eventually the army published the field manual “Dog Team Transportation” based on their work while at Camp Hale. This book was reprinted in recent years and makes an interesting reference for a musher’s library.

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Mace oversaw this diverse and opinionated group. There was fierce rivalry between the dog drivers and the mule skinners quartered next to them. “On one occasion a dog team was driven to the top of Homestake Peak just to prove to the mule skinners that it could be done.” In the summer months the sled dogs were to be trained as pack dogs. This program was soon modified when larger breeds such as Saint Bernards and Great Pyrenees proved superior in packing. Mushers resisted working with the pack dogs and developed a snobbish reputation. But not for long, the planned invasion of Norway was canceled and Camp Hale was to be closed down.

In 1943 after only one year at Camp Hale, the K-9 unit was shipped to Camp Rimini near Helena, Mont., to consolidate the sled/pack dogs programs. Although some sled dogs were shipped to Europe they never saw much action as World War II wound down before they could be fully utilized. The remaining dog training operation was shipped again from Camp Rimini to Fort Robinson, Neb. In 1946 the sled/pack dog program was totally deactivated. “All the remaining dogs and most of the equipment on hand at this time were simply sold as surplus.”

Back in the Boulder, Colo., area after the war, Stuart Mace continued with mushing. He had purchased puppies from the sled dog unit to start his own operation. In 1948 he moved his family and dogs to Ashcroft, Colo. Ashcroft, near Aspen was a former mining town that had become a ghost town before it was “rediscovered” as a training area for Winter Olympics. Stuart started up the first dogsled ride company in Colorado. Here he built “Toklat” a beautiful lodge and restaurant that was run by his family.

Stuart Mace and his attractive malamutes captured more than the imagination of the local tourists. They became movies stars, performing in the “Sargent Preston of the Yukon” TV series and other television shows. The dogs were the real attraction, Stuart performed as the stunt man. False fronts were put on the old ghost town buildings of Ashcroft to make it appear to be an active Canadian village. Mace never liked the Hollywood term “Mush!” “You can get them started any way you want, but don’t yell Mush!” Their Hollywood stint lasted over three years 1952-55. VHS copies of some episodes of this classic northern adventure series can still be found on the Internet.

Although Stuart Mace passed away in 1993 his relocated kennel remains a popular tourist destination in the Snowmass Village area. In 1974, Mace gave his kennel to apprentice Dan MacEachen who continues to operate under the name of Krabloonik. There is no doubt that Stuart Mace through his military work, Hollywood appearances and sled tours made mushing popular in Colorado and around the world today.

When I first tell someone I’m a musher, they usually give me a rather odd look followed with some comment like “I didn’t know there were sled dogs in Colorado; do you go to Alaska often?” It seems to be a common misconception that sled dogs are only found in the far north. I explain to them that there are indeed lots of sled dogs and races in our region, but generally I spare them the whole history of Colorado sled dogs.

Colorado does not have a long history of flashy French-Canadian fur trappers, hardy Eskimos, rowdy gold miners or proud Canadian Mounties traveling the countryside by dog team. World War II was on when sled dogs entered the scene in Colorado. It had been determined that dogs could help with the war as sentry, messenger, pack and sled dogs. A program called “Dogs for Defense” was formed where citizens across the country could donate their canines for military service. The initial estimates of 200 dogs needed was way, way low. By the end of the war over 10,000 animals had joined the troops and dogs still serve military duty today.

Local sled dog history started with a young man in the military. He was assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, an alpine unit training for the especially challenging winter wartime conditions. The 2nd lieutenant was in a rather awkward position since as a conscientious objector he didn’t want to bears arms against fellow mankind. When called to his superior’s office, this young soldier was really concerned what might become of him. The summons was only to give him his next assignment – head of the newly formed sled dog patrol. A botanist by training, Stuart Mace had no previous experience with huskies. Several good dog men that had worked in Alaska, New England and the Antarctic were to become his advisers for this unusual assignment.

In 1942 the 10th Mountain Division was training at Camp Hale, near Leadville, Colo. Their foundation mission was to train for a planned invasion of Norway. This location was ideal for training sled dogs with its altitude, geography and extreme winter conditions. Any musher that has been to Camp Hale knows well how great the snow can be and how miserable the weather can get! Today little remains at the site of Camp Hale, along Highway 24 overlooking the valley, a roadside marker gives a brief history of the former military camp.

Dogs to be trained were shipped to Camp Hale, Colo., and Camp Rimini, Mont., from all points. Railroad was the usual mode of transportation. Dogs were often left loose in the box cars for exercise on the long journey. Some dogs came from the east where sled dog racing was popular, others came in from the Alaska territory. Malamute and husky type dogs were still fairly uncommon in the United States so lacking suitable donations, some native dogs were purchased or traded for and shipped in from Canada and the northern regions.

With no experience or manual to guide him, Stuart plunged into the task of training men and dogs to become teams ready to supply isolated battalions and remove injured soldiers from the front lines. Everything had to be reinvented for military needs. Renowned sled builder and former musher with Admiral Byrd, Ed Moody helped design and build specialized sleds. Efficient harnesses and ganglines were tested and developed. The few experienced mushers helped with the training of the teams. Eventually the army published the field manual “Dog Team Transportation” based on their work while at Camp Hale. This book was reprinted in recent years and makes an interesting reference for a musher’s library.

Mace oversaw this diverse and opinionated group. There was fierce rivalry between the dog drivers and the mule skinners quartered next to them. “On one occasion a dog team was driven to the top of Homestake Peak just to prove to the mule skinners that it could be done.” In the summer months the sled dogs were to be trained as pack dogs. This program was soon modified when larger breeds such as Saint Bernards and Great Pyrenees proved superior in packing. Mushers resisted working with the pack dogs and developed a snobbish reputation. But not for long, the planned invasion of Norway was canceled and Camp Hale was to be closed down.

In 1943 after only one year at Camp Hale, the K-9 unit was shipped to Camp Rimini near Helena, Mont., to consolidate the sled/pack dogs programs. Although some sled dogs were shipped to Europe they never saw much action as World War II wound down before they could be fully utilized. The remaining dog training operation was shipped again from Camp Rimini to Fort Robinson, Neb. In 1946 the sled/pack dog program was totally deactivated. “All the remaining dogs and most of the equipment on hand at this time were simply sold as surplus.”

Back in the Boulder, Colo., area after the war, Stuart Mace continued with mushing. He had purchased puppies from the sled dog unit to start his own operation. In 1948 he moved his family and dogs to Ashcroft, Colo. Ashcroft, near Aspen was a former mining town that had become a ghost town before it was “rediscovered” as a training area for Winter Olympics. Stuart started up the first dogsled ride company in Colorado. Here he built “Toklat” a beautiful lodge and restaurant that was run by his family.

Stuart Mace and his attractive malamutes captured more than the imagination of the local tourists. They became movies stars, performing in the “Sargent Preston of the Yukon” TV series and other television shows. The dogs were the real attraction, Stuart performed as the stunt man. False fronts were put on the old ghost town buildings of Ashcroft to make it appear to be an active Canadian village. Mace never liked the Hollywood term “Mush!” “You can get them started any way you want, but don’t yell Mush!” Their Hollywood stint lasted over three years 1952-55. VHS copies of some episodes of this classic northern adventure series can still be found on the Internet.

Although Stuart Mace passed away in 1993 his relocated kennel remains a popular tourist destination in the Snowmass Village area. In 1974, Mace gave his kennel to apprentice Dan MacEachen who continues to operate under the name of Krabloonik. There is no doubt that Stuart Mace through his military work, Hollywood appearances and sled tours made mushing popular in Colorado and around the world today.

When I first tell someone I’m a musher, they usually give me a rather odd look followed with some comment like “I didn’t know there were sled dogs in Colorado; do you go to Alaska often?” It seems to be a common misconception that sled dogs are only found in the far north. I explain to them that there are indeed lots of sled dogs and races in our region, but generally I spare them the whole history of Colorado sled dogs.

Colorado does not have a long history of flashy French-Canadian fur trappers, hardy Eskimos, rowdy gold miners or proud Canadian Mounties traveling the countryside by dog team. World War II was on when sled dogs entered the scene in Colorado. It had been determined that dogs could help with the war as sentry, messenger, pack and sled dogs. A program called “Dogs for Defense” was formed where citizens across the country could donate their canines for military service. The initial estimates of 200 dogs needed was way, way low. By the end of the war over 10,000 animals had joined the troops and dogs still serve military duty today.

Local sled dog history started with a young man in the military. He was assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, an alpine unit training for the especially challenging winter wartime conditions. The 2nd lieutenant was in a rather awkward position since as a conscientious objector he didn’t want to bears arms against fellow mankind. When called to his superior’s office, this young soldier was really concerned what might become of him. The summons was only to give him his next assignment – head of the newly formed sled dog patrol. A botanist by training, Stuart Mace had no previous experience with huskies. Several good dog men that had worked in Alaska, New England and the Antarctic were to become his advisers for this unusual assignment.

In 1942 the 10th Mountain Division was training at Camp Hale, near Leadville, Colo. Their foundation mission was to train for a planned invasion of Norway. This location was ideal for training sled dogs with its altitude, geography and extreme winter conditions. Any musher that has been to Camp Hale knows well how great the snow can be and how miserable the weather can get! Today little remains at the site of Camp Hale, along Highway 24 overlooking the valley, a roadside marker gives a brief history of the former military camp.

Dogs to be trained were shipped to Camp Hale, Colo., and Camp Rimini, Mont., from all points. Railroad was the usual mode of transportation. Dogs were often left loose in the box cars for exercise on the long journey. Some dogs came from the east where sled dog racing was popular, others came in from the Alaska territory. Malamute and husky type dogs were still fairly uncommon in the United States so lacking suitable donations, some native dogs were purchased or traded for and shipped in from Canada and the northern regions.

With no experience or manual to guide him, Stuart plunged into the task of training men and dogs to become teams ready to supply isolated battalions and remove injured soldiers from the front lines. Everything had to be reinvented for military needs. Renowned sled builder and former musher with Admiral Byrd, Ed Moody helped design and build specialized sleds. Efficient harnesses and ganglines were tested and developed. The few experienced mushers helped with the training of the teams. Eventually the army published the field manual “Dog Team Transportation” based on their work while at Camp Hale. This book was reprinted in recent years and makes an interesting reference for a musher’s library.

Mace oversaw this diverse and opinionated group. There was fierce rivalry between the dog drivers and the mule skinners quartered next to them. “On one occasion a dog team was driven to the top of Homestake Peak just to prove to the mule skinners that it could be done.” In the summer months the sled dogs were to be trained as pack dogs. This program was soon modified when larger breeds such as Saint Bernards and Great Pyrenees proved superior in packing. Mushers resisted working with the pack dogs and developed a snobbish reputation. But not for long, the planned invasion of Norway was canceled and Camp Hale was to be closed down.

In 1943 after only one year at Camp Hale, the K-9 unit was shipped to Camp Rimini near Helena, Mont., to consolidate the sled/pack dogs programs. Although some sled dogs were shipped to Europe they never saw much action as World War II wound down before they could be fully utilized. The remaining dog training operation was shipped again from Camp Rimini to Fort Robinson, Neb. In 1946 the sled/pack dog program was totally deactivated. “All the remaining dogs and most of the equipment on hand at this time were simply sold as surplus.”

Back in the Boulder, Colo., area after the war, Stuart Mace continued with mushing. He had purchased puppies from the sled dog unit to start his own operation. In 1948 he moved his family and dogs to Ashcroft, Colo. Ashcroft, near Aspen was a former mining town that had become a ghost town before it was “rediscovered” as a training area for Winter Olympics. Stuart started up the first dogsled ride company in Colorado. Here he built “Toklat” a beautiful lodge and restaurant that was run by his family.

Stuart Mace and his attractive malamutes captured more than the imagination of the local tourists. They became movies stars, performing in the “Sargent Preston of the Yukon” TV series and other television shows. The dogs were the real attraction, Stuart performed as the stunt man. False fronts were put on the old ghost town buildings of Ashcroft to make it appear to be an active Canadian village. Mace never liked the Hollywood term “Mush!” “You can get them started any way you want, but don’t yell Mush!” Their Hollywood stint lasted over three years 1952-55. VHS copies of some episodes of this classic northern adventure series can still be found on the Internet.

Although Stuart Mace passed away in 1993 his relocated kennel remains a popular tourist destination in the Snowmass Village area. In 1974, Mace gave his kennel to apprentice Dan MacEachen who continues to operate under the name of Krabloonik. There is no doubt that Stuart Mace through his military work, Hollywood appearances and sled tours made mushing popular in Colorado and around the world today.

When I first tell someone I’m a musher, they usually give me a rather odd look followed with some comment like “I didn’t know there were sled dogs in Colorado; do you go to Alaska often?” It seems to be a common misconception that sled dogs are only found in the far north. I explain to them that there are indeed lots of sled dogs and races in our region, but generally I spare them the whole history of Colorado sled dogs.

Colorado does not have a long history of flashy French-Canadian fur trappers, hardy Eskimos, rowdy gold miners or proud Canadian Mounties traveling the countryside by dog team. World War II was on when sled dogs entered the scene in Colorado. It had been determined that dogs could help with the war as sentry, messenger, pack and sled dogs. A program called “Dogs for Defense” was formed where citizens across the country could donate their canines for military service. The initial estimates of 200 dogs needed was way, way low. By the end of the war over 10,000 animals had joined the troops and dogs still serve military duty today.

Local sled dog history started with a young man in the military. He was assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, an alpine unit training for the especially challenging winter wartime conditions. The 2nd lieutenant was in a rather awkward position since as a conscientious objector he didn’t want to bears arms against fellow mankind. When called to his superior’s office, this young soldier was really concerned what might become of him. The summons was only to give him his next assignment – head of the newly formed sled dog patrol. A botanist by training, Stuart Mace had no previous experience with huskies. Several good dog men that had worked in Alaska, New England and the Antarctic were to become his advisers for this unusual assignment.

In 1942 the 10th Mountain Division was training at Camp Hale, near Leadville, Colo. Their foundation mission was to train for a planned invasion of Norway. This location was ideal for training sled dogs with its altitude, geography and extreme winter conditions. Any musher that has been to Camp Hale knows well how great the snow can be and how miserable the weather can get! Today little remains at the site of Camp Hale, along Highway 24 overlooking the valley, a roadside marker gives a brief history of the former military camp.

Dogs to be trained were shipped to Camp Hale, Colo., and Camp Rimini, Mont., from all points. Railroad was the usual mode of transportation. Dogs were often left loose in the box cars for exercise on the long journey. Some dogs came from the east where sled dog racing was popular, others came in from the Alaska territory. Malamute and husky type dogs were still fairly uncommon in the United States so lacking suitable donations, some native dogs were purchased or traded for and shipped in from Canada and the northern regions.

With no experience or manual to guide him, Stuart plunged into the task of training men and dogs to become teams ready to supply isolated battalions and remove injured soldiers from the front lines. Everything had to be reinvented for military needs. Renowned sled builder and former musher with Admiral Byrd, Ed Moody helped design and build specialized sleds. Efficient harnesses and ganglines were tested and developed. The few experienced mushers helped with the training of the teams. Eventually the army published the field manual “Dog Team Transportation” based on their work while at Camp Hale. This book was reprinted in recent years and makes an interesting reference for a musher’s library.

Mace oversaw this diverse and opinionated group. There was fierce rivalry between the dog drivers and the mule skinners quartered next to them. “On one occasion a dog team was driven to the top of Homestake Peak just to prove to the mule skinners that it could be done.” In the summer months the sled dogs were to be trained as pack dogs. This program was soon modified when larger breeds such as Saint Bernards and Great Pyrenees proved superior in packing. Mushers resisted working with the pack dogs and developed a snobbish reputation. But not for long, the planned invasion of Norway was canceled and Camp Hale was to be closed down.

In 1943 after only one year at Camp Hale, the K-9 unit was shipped to Camp Rimini near Helena, Mont., to consolidate the sled/pack dogs programs. Although some sled dogs were shipped to Europe they never saw much action as World War II wound down before they could be fully utilized. The remaining dog training operation was shipped again from Camp Rimini to Fort Robinson, Neb. In 1946 the sled/pack dog program was totally deactivated. “All the remaining dogs and most of the equipment on hand at this time were simply sold as surplus.”

Back in the Boulder, Colo., area after the war, Stuart Mace continued with mushing. He had purchased puppies from the sled dog unit to start his own operation. In 1948 he moved his family and dogs to Ashcroft, Colo. Ashcroft, near Aspen was a former mining town that had become a ghost town before it was “rediscovered” as a training area for Winter Olympics. Stuart started up the first dogsled ride company in Colorado. Here he built “Toklat” a beautiful lodge and restaurant that was run by his family.

Stuart Mace and his attractive malamutes captured more than the imagination of the local tourists. They became movies stars, performing in the “Sargent Preston of the Yukon” TV series and other television shows. The dogs were the real attraction, Stuart performed as the stunt man. False fronts were put on the old ghost town buildings of Ashcroft to make it appear to be an active Canadian village. Mace never liked the Hollywood term “Mush!” “You can get them started any way you want, but don’t yell Mush!” Their Hollywood stint lasted over three years 1952-55. VHS copies of some episodes of this classic northern adventure series can still be found on the Internet.

Although Stuart Mace passed away in 1993 his relocated kennel remains a popular tourist destination in the Snowmass Village area. In 1974, Mace gave his kennel to apprentice Dan MacEachen who continues to operate under the name of Krabloonik. There is no doubt that Stuart Mace through his military work, Hollywood appearances and sled tours made mushing popular in Colorado and around the world today.

When I first tell someone I’m a musher, they usually give me a rather odd look followed with some comment like “I didn’t know there were sled dogs in Colorado; do you go to Alaska often?” It seems to be a common misconception that sled dogs are only found in the far north. I explain to them that there are indeed lots of sled dogs and races in our region, but generally I spare them the whole history of Colorado sled dogs.

Colorado does not have a long history of flashy French-Canadian fur trappers, hardy Eskimos, rowdy gold miners or proud Canadian Mounties traveling the countryside by dog team. World War II was on when sled dogs entered the scene in Colorado. It had been determined that dogs could help with the war as sentry, messenger, pack and sled dogs. A program called “Dogs for Defense” was formed where citizens across the country could donate their canines for military service. The initial estimates of 200 dogs needed was way, way low. By the end of the war over 10,000 animals had joined the troops and dogs still serve military duty today.

Local sled dog history started with a young man in the military. He was assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, an alpine unit training for the especially challenging winter wartime conditions. The 2nd lieutenant was in a rather awkward position since as a conscientious objector he didn’t want to bears arms against fellow mankind. When called to his superior’s office, this young soldier was really concerned what might become of him. The summons was only to give him his next assignment – head of the newly formed sled dog patrol. A botanist by training, Stuart Mace had no previous experience with huskies. Several good dog men that had worked in Alaska, New England and the Antarctic were to become his advisers for this unusual assignment.

In 1942 the 10th Mountain Division was training at Camp Hale, near Leadville, Colo. Their foundation mission was to train for a planned invasion of Norway. This location was ideal for training sled dogs with its altitude, geography and extreme winter conditions. Any musher that has been to Camp Hale knows well how great the snow can be and how miserable the weather can get! Today little remains at the site of Camp Hale, along Highway 24 overlooking the valley, a roadside marker gives a brief history of the former military camp.

Dogs to be trained were shipped to Camp Hale, Colo., and Camp Rimini, Mont., from all points. Railroad was the usual mode of transportation. Dogs were often left loose in the box cars for exercise on the long journey. Some dogs came from the east where sled dog racing was popular, others came in from the Alaska territory. Malamute and husky type dogs were still fairly uncommon in the United States so lacking suitable donations, some native dogs were purchased or traded for and shipped in from Canada and the northern regions.

With no experience or manual to guide him, Stuart plunged into the task of training men and dogs to become teams ready to supply isolated battalions and remove injured soldiers from the front lines. Everything had to be reinvented for military needs. Renowned sled builder and former musher with Admiral Byrd, Ed Moody helped design and build specialized sleds. Efficient harnesses and ganglines were tested and developed. The few experienced mushers helped with the training of the teams. Eventually the army published the field manual “Dog Team Transportation” based on their work while at Camp Hale. This book was reprinted in recent years and makes an interesting reference for a musher’s library.

Mace oversaw this diverse and opinionated group. There was fierce rivalry between the dog drivers and the mule skinners quartered next to them. “On one occasion a dog team was driven to the top of Homestake Peak just to prove to the mule skinners that it could be done.” In the summer months the sled dogs were to be trained as pack dogs. This program was soon modified when larger breeds such as Saint Bernards and Great Pyrenees proved superior in packing. Mushers resisted working with the pack dogs and developed a snobbish reputation. But not for long, the planned invasion of Norway was canceled and Camp Hale was to be closed down.

In 1943 after only one year at Camp Hale, the K-9 unit was shipped to Camp Rimini near Helena, Mont., to consolidate the sled/pack dogs programs. Although some sled dogs were shipped to Europe they never saw much action as World War II wound down before they could be fully utilized. The remaining dog training operation was shipped again from Camp Rimini to Fort Robinson, Neb. In 1946 the sled/pack dog program was totally deactivated. “All the remaining dogs and most of the equipment on hand at this time were simply sold as surplus.”

Back in the Boulder, Colo., area after the war, Stuart Mace continued with mushing. He had purchased puppies from the sled dog unit to start his own operation. In 1948 he moved his family and dogs to Ashcroft, Colo. Ashcroft, near Aspen was a former mining town that had become a ghost town before it was “rediscovered” as a training area for Winter Olympics. Stuart started up the first dogsled ride company in Colorado. Here he built “Toklat” a beautiful lodge and restaurant that was run by his family.

Stuart Mace and his attractive malamutes captured more than the imagination of the local tourists. They became movies stars, performing in the “Sargent Preston of the Yukon” TV series and other television shows. The dogs were the real attraction, Stuart performed as the stunt man. False fronts were put on the old ghost town buildings of Ashcroft to make it appear to be an active Canadian village. Mace never liked the Hollywood term “Mush!” “You can get them started any way you want, but don’t yell Mush!” Their Hollywood stint lasted over three years 1952-55. VHS copies of some episodes of this classic northern adventure series can still be found on the Internet.

Although Stuart Mace passed away in 1993 his relocated kennel remains a popular tourist destination in the Snowmass Village area. In 1974, Mace gave his kennel to apprentice Dan MacEachen who continues to operate under the name of Krabloonik. There is no doubt that Stuart Mace through his military work, Hollywood appearances and sled tours made mushing popular in Colorado and around the world today.