More good deeds | TheFencePost.com

More good deeds

An odd thing about doing good deeds sometimes it’s difficult to tell the stories. We are taught not to blow our own horns so the column lets those who have a good story tell it without seeming to brag. Three more have come to light.

This first good deed happened during a past winter. Rachel, a hairdresser in Hot Springs, S.D., fell on the ice while she was going into her shop and broke both bones in one leg. Imagine a self-employed lady who could not do her job for a long period of time. What could she do for income? Maggie is a local gal who used to have a full salon and now only cuts hair had one answer. She advertised that if she cut hair for any of Rachel’s clients, the funds would go to Rachel. How’s that for helping?

The western slope of Colorado is another area where we hear of good deeds. Here’s the scene. An almost 80-year old man was fishing by himself in May of 2018, and there were people around; he wasn’t in a deserted place. As he was striving to get his line into the water he fell and his leg broke. It was a bad break, next to his hip. Across the lake about a half-mile, another fisherman saw the accident. Realizing the man was alone and needed help, he jumped in his pickup and hightailed it over. It took several people to pull the injured man up the bank. A helicopter came in to transport the man 135 miles to a hospital.

The good deeds didn’t stop there. A couple and their adult son took over responsibility for the man’s RV and truck as well as his dog. With guidance to his residence from another friend, the family brought everything to the home of the man who was hurt. It was not just time; they went 50 miles out of their planned route, returning everything in pristine shape. What did they ask in return? Nothing, and they would only accept a thank you.

“A Kansas friend has a big heart and her mission in life is serving others — literally. As farmers — and people connected to them — know, when it is harvest time the calendar doesn’t matter. One fourth of July the wheat harvest was in full swing and the workers included those at the local grain elevator.”

A Kansas friend has a big heart and her mission in life is serving others — literally. As farmers — and people connected to them — know, when it is harvest time the calendar doesn’t matter. One fourth of July the wheat harvest was in full swing and the workers included those at the local grain elevator. My friend cooked up pulled pork barbeque sandwiches and several different salads and served them to the employees, as each one was able to take his break to eat.

Later in the fall during corn harvest it rained and snowed which made for a long harvest. Again my friend thought of the 14 employees at the elevator. She baked up care packages and wrote notes of appreciation for the workers.

This was her fifth year of this outreach. She has started working with kids on cookie decorating and other activities to teach them how to be a blessing to others. Perhaps there are lessons here for all of us. ❖



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