Daylight saving time | TheFencePost.com

Daylight saving time

Did you have difficulty adjusting when the clocks were changed from Daylight Saving Time back to Standard Time?

If you live in Arizona or Hawaii your clocks didn’t change in the spring and you didn’t have to mess with it. Although farmers and ranchers run more by the sun than the clock, any association with the world — school students, appointments, jobs in town — require the changes be observed. It takes a few days to fit into the new schedule.

We owned and operated a Grade A dairy for five years. The time change is especially challenging for dairy farmers. The cows have an internal clock and it doesn’t reset that easily. The nearest thing they have to a clock is the sun. When we dairied it took several days to get the herd up and ready to go at a different time. There’s just no explaining it to cows.

We have a grandson who used to wake up at 6 a.m.; then after the time change, he got up at 5 and he wondered why everyone wasn’t ready to head out the door. A few months later, the clocks changed back. What’s a little boy to do? Every year there are politicians who make a case for discontinuing the practice, but for some reason it doesn’t get very far — though not for lack of trying.

“It is interesting to note that the attempts at standardizing time across the U.S. didn’t begin until 1883, when railroads saw the need because of schedules; we can blame Benjamin Franklin for coming up with the idea of this manner of changing the clock way back in 1874.”

It is interesting to note that the attempts at standardizing time across the U.S. didn’t begin until 1883, when railroads saw the need because of schedules; we can blame Benjamin Franklin for coming up with the idea of this manner of changing the clock way back in 1874.

During World War I, it was observed for two years, 1918 and 1919. Once the war was over, the law was repealed only to rear its head again during World War II, when it was changed in 1945 to let states and local governments set it for themselves. Realizing that created problems, the Uniform Time Act passed in 1966 so every locale that followed Daylight Saving Time started and stopped on the same days. Even so, exemptions were allowed. The law has changed several times over the years. Just trying to follow the history is dizzying, and it’s a bother when we have to change. I’m always glad we don’t have more clocks in our house than we do. When I visit The Clock Shop in Rapid City, S.D., I always wonder how long it takes to reset their clocks. Do they have several people working on it at once or do they have a relaxed attitude wherein they take their time, as it were?

I’d prefer to stay on one system or another. When it is pitch dark at 5 in the evening, it really takes a chunk out of the day. For me it’s also psychological. Simply put, I am solar powered and turn into a sleepy head about an hour after it gets dark. I’m betting that many who live in this geographical area do also.

The internet latchstring is always out through peggy@peggysanders.com. ❖


Peggy Sanders




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