Pasta – brought to America by Thomas Jefferson | TheFencePost.com

Pasta – brought to America by Thomas Jefferson

Anna Aughenbaugh
Fort Collins, Colo.

Pasta recipes appeared in print in the 16th century. China claims to have invented pasta, and Italy has made it a household word. When Thomas Jefferson visited Europe, he found macaroni such a delight that he brought home a recipe for homemade noodles, along with drawings of a machine to shape dough into tubes. His notes called for two eggs, beaten with a wine glass of milk, a teaspoon of salt and enough hard flour to make smooth, firm dough. Thomas visited a cheese dairy and made notes on cheese making. Back in America, he introduced macaroni and cheese.

There are about 100 types of pasta; use shaped and tube pastas for meaty, cheesy sauces. Long pastas are best for smooth or slightly chunky sauces. Italians just lightly coat their pasta with a bit of sauce, unlike us Americans who tend to drown ours. Pasta meals are usually welcomed by young and old alike, are easy on the budget and quick to prepare.

Use four quarts of water to cook a pound of pasta. Bring it to a boil; (this will take about 20 minutes) add 2 teaspoons of salt and the pasta. Stir to keep it from sticking together, bring to a boil again, then simmer, stir frequently until done. Pasta is usually done about three minutes before the package indicates doneness. Do not cover the pan because it will probably cause it to boil over. Adding oil to the cooking water won’t keep the pasta from sticking together, but may keep it from boiling over. Unless you will use the pasta in a salad, don’t rinse because that will remove the starchy layer that helps sauce to stick. If cooked pasta sticks together, quickly hold it under hot running water, then drain.

To serve pasta hot, put a large heat resistant serving bowl in the sink; set a colander in the bowl and pour the cooked pasta into it to drain.

Pour the water out of the bowl, dry it and put the pasta into the bowl.

It is handy to have store-bought sauce on hand, but homemade can be either made ahead, or while the pasta is cooking. Canned tomatoes work better than fresh in sauces.

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Pasta recipes appeared in print in the 16th century. China claims to have invented pasta, and Italy has made it a household word. When Thomas Jefferson visited Europe, he found macaroni such a delight that he brought home a recipe for homemade noodles, along with drawings of a machine to shape dough into tubes. His notes called for two eggs, beaten with a wine glass of milk, a teaspoon of salt and enough hard flour to make smooth, firm dough. Thomas visited a cheese dairy and made notes on cheese making. Back in America, he introduced macaroni and cheese.

There are about 100 types of pasta; use shaped and tube pastas for meaty, cheesy sauces. Long pastas are best for smooth or slightly chunky sauces. Italians just lightly coat their pasta with a bit of sauce, unlike us Americans who tend to drown ours. Pasta meals are usually welcomed by young and old alike, are easy on the budget and quick to prepare.

Use four quarts of water to cook a pound of pasta. Bring it to a boil; (this will take about 20 minutes) add 2 teaspoons of salt and the pasta. Stir to keep it from sticking together, bring to a boil again, then simmer, stir frequently until done. Pasta is usually done about three minutes before the package indicates doneness. Do not cover the pan because it will probably cause it to boil over. Adding oil to the cooking water won’t keep the pasta from sticking together, but may keep it from boiling over. Unless you will use the pasta in a salad, don’t rinse because that will remove the starchy layer that helps sauce to stick. If cooked pasta sticks together, quickly hold it under hot running water, then drain.

To serve pasta hot, put a large heat resistant serving bowl in the sink; set a colander in the bowl and pour the cooked pasta into it to drain.

Pour the water out of the bowl, dry it and put the pasta into the bowl.

It is handy to have store-bought sauce on hand, but homemade can be either made ahead, or while the pasta is cooking. Canned tomatoes work better than fresh in sauces.

Pasta recipes appeared in print in the 16th century. China claims to have invented pasta, and Italy has made it a household word. When Thomas Jefferson visited Europe, he found macaroni such a delight that he brought home a recipe for homemade noodles, along with drawings of a machine to shape dough into tubes. His notes called for two eggs, beaten with a wine glass of milk, a teaspoon of salt and enough hard flour to make smooth, firm dough. Thomas visited a cheese dairy and made notes on cheese making. Back in America, he introduced macaroni and cheese.

There are about 100 types of pasta; use shaped and tube pastas for meaty, cheesy sauces. Long pastas are best for smooth or slightly chunky sauces. Italians just lightly coat their pasta with a bit of sauce, unlike us Americans who tend to drown ours. Pasta meals are usually welcomed by young and old alike, are easy on the budget and quick to prepare.

Use four quarts of water to cook a pound of pasta. Bring it to a boil; (this will take about 20 minutes) add 2 teaspoons of salt and the pasta. Stir to keep it from sticking together, bring to a boil again, then simmer, stir frequently until done. Pasta is usually done about three minutes before the package indicates doneness. Do not cover the pan because it will probably cause it to boil over. Adding oil to the cooking water won’t keep the pasta from sticking together, but may keep it from boiling over. Unless you will use the pasta in a salad, don’t rinse because that will remove the starchy layer that helps sauce to stick. If cooked pasta sticks together, quickly hold it under hot running water, then drain.

To serve pasta hot, put a large heat resistant serving bowl in the sink; set a colander in the bowl and pour the cooked pasta into it to drain.

Pour the water out of the bowl, dry it and put the pasta into the bowl.

It is handy to have store-bought sauce on hand, but homemade can be either made ahead, or while the pasta is cooking. Canned tomatoes work better than fresh in sauces.

Pasta recipes appeared in print in the 16th century. China claims to have invented pasta, and Italy has made it a household word. When Thomas Jefferson visited Europe, he found macaroni such a delight that he brought home a recipe for homemade noodles, along with drawings of a machine to shape dough into tubes. His notes called for two eggs, beaten with a wine glass of milk, a teaspoon of salt and enough hard flour to make smooth, firm dough. Thomas visited a cheese dairy and made notes on cheese making. Back in America, he introduced macaroni and cheese.

There are about 100 types of pasta; use shaped and tube pastas for meaty, cheesy sauces. Long pastas are best for smooth or slightly chunky sauces. Italians just lightly coat their pasta with a bit of sauce, unlike us Americans who tend to drown ours. Pasta meals are usually welcomed by young and old alike, are easy on the budget and quick to prepare.

Use four quarts of water to cook a pound of pasta. Bring it to a boil; (this will take about 20 minutes) add 2 teaspoons of salt and the pasta. Stir to keep it from sticking together, bring to a boil again, then simmer, stir frequently until done. Pasta is usually done about three minutes before the package indicates doneness. Do not cover the pan because it will probably cause it to boil over. Adding oil to the cooking water won’t keep the pasta from sticking together, but may keep it from boiling over. Unless you will use the pasta in a salad, don’t rinse because that will remove the starchy layer that helps sauce to stick. If cooked pasta sticks together, quickly hold it under hot running water, then drain.

To serve pasta hot, put a large heat resistant serving bowl in the sink; set a colander in the bowl and pour the cooked pasta into it to drain.

Pour the water out of the bowl, dry it and put the pasta into the bowl.

It is handy to have store-bought sauce on hand, but homemade can be either made ahead, or while the pasta is cooking. Canned tomatoes work better than fresh in sauces.