PeeWee, the Wonder Calf | TheFencePost.com
YOUR AD HERE »

PeeWee, the Wonder Calf

Jo StankoTucker feeding PeeWee for the first time.

PeeWee was born on May 2, 2009, just before sunset when the temperature was a balmy 20 degrees.

It was apparent that he was different from all the other calves in one way only; he only weighed 20 pounds. What made PeeWee a Wonder Calf were the series of wonders which came one right after the other: wonder if he’ll make it through the night, how will he feed, is he one of a set of twins, did his sibling die in his mother’s womb, will he need to be bucketed, how will he develop, how big will he get?

His early life was that of a normal calf. He hung out with the other calves, nibbled at grass and grew in perfect proportion. His life changed at branding. He was too small for anything except the herd ID tag but instead of being worked on the calf table, he was picked up and held under one arm while receiving his number. He and his mother were put into a closed-in field because his mother had developed a heart condition and wasn’t expected to survive.



After his mother died, PeeWee moved into the old leaky chicken house with a small pen built to accommodate him. He took to the blue bucket after one feeding and would follow it anywhere. Except for company three times a day during feeding, he was pretty much alone.

Fritz, the Border Collie who swung from the tails of some of the cows, was frightened of him and didn’t even give him any company. Looking for alternative living accommodations, we tried to convince our daughter-in-law that taking care of PeeWee would be a great learning experience for our grandchildren and their urban neighbors. However, our son who has had experience with bucket calves vetoed that. Then, along came Tucker Sanford.



Tucker was willing to take PeeWee on as a bucket calf project for the Routt County Fair. PeeWee’s life style changed drastically. He got to live in his own stall in a new barn. He was fed from the blue bucket but had someone to play with daily. He was escorted to green grass to graze, learned to eat pellets and hay and learned to be groomed. He and Tucker took long walks together daily. Even when Tucker had to go for a visit with family, PeeWee got his long walks with Tucker’s grandmother, Jo Semotan.

When the Routt County Fair came, PeeWee and Tucker were ready. For fun, Tucker and PeeWee were entered in the “Dress your Animal” competition. While there were plenty of horses, dogs, a chicken, sheep and goats, PeeWee was the only cow. They entered as hippies. They placed second. In a more serious vein, they were entered in the bucket calf contest where no ranking was awarded; but the judge commented on how well Tucker had managed an excellent rate of gain (PeeWee had put on over 50 pounds in 12 weeks without developing the pot belly many bucket calves develop). Finally, Tucker and PeeWee entered the showmanship junior showmanship class with all the market ready steers where they took fourth.

There’s only one thing left to wonder – what will we do with a wig-wearing hippie steer calf?

PeeWee was born on May 2, 2009, just before sunset when the temperature was a balmy 20 degrees.

It was apparent that he was different from all the other calves in one way only; he only weighed 20 pounds. What made PeeWee a Wonder Calf were the series of wonders which came one right after the other: wonder if he’ll make it through the night, how will he feed, is he one of a set of twins, did his sibling die in his mother’s womb, will he need to be bucketed, how will he develop, how big will he get?

His early life was that of a normal calf. He hung out with the other calves, nibbled at grass and grew in perfect proportion. His life changed at branding. He was too small for anything except the herd ID tag but instead of being worked on the calf table, he was picked up and held under one arm while receiving his number. He and his mother were put into a closed-in field because his mother had developed a heart condition and wasn’t expected to survive.

After his mother died, PeeWee moved into the old leaky chicken house with a small pen built to accommodate him. He took to the blue bucket after one feeding and would follow it anywhere. Except for company three times a day during feeding, he was pretty much alone.

Fritz, the Border Collie who swung from the tails of some of the cows, was frightened of him and didn’t even give him any company. Looking for alternative living accommodations, we tried to convince our daughter-in-law that taking care of PeeWee would be a great learning experience for our grandchildren and their urban neighbors. However, our son who has had experience with bucket calves vetoed that. Then, along came Tucker Sanford.

Tucker was willing to take PeeWee on as a bucket calf project for the Routt County Fair. PeeWee’s life style changed drastically. He got to live in his own stall in a new barn. He was fed from the blue bucket but had someone to play with daily. He was escorted to green grass to graze, learned to eat pellets and hay and learned to be groomed. He and Tucker took long walks together daily. Even when Tucker had to go for a visit with family, PeeWee got his long walks with Tucker’s grandmother, Jo Semotan.

When the Routt County Fair came, PeeWee and Tucker were ready. For fun, Tucker and PeeWee were entered in the “Dress your Animal” competition. While there were plenty of horses, dogs, a chicken, sheep and goats, PeeWee was the only cow. They entered as hippies. They placed second. In a more serious vein, they were entered in the bucket calf contest where no ranking was awarded; but the judge commented on how well Tucker had managed an excellent rate of gain (PeeWee had put on over 50 pounds in 12 weeks without developing the pot belly many bucket calves develop). Finally, Tucker and PeeWee entered the showmanship junior showmanship class with all the market ready steers where they took fourth.

There’s only one thing left to wonder – what will we do with a wig-wearing hippie steer calf?


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User