Petersen: My interesting yesterday | TheFencePost.com

Petersen: My interesting yesterday

Is it snowing where you live? Here's how my yesterday went.

The snow fell constantly for multiple days. Then it stopped. Then the wind blew — up to 70 miles per hour.

There were humongous drifts, we were snowbound for three days, portions of the Interstate were closed, so many travelers were stuck here in Big Timber and several churches volunteered as shelters for the stranded folk.

All the motels and hotels were full and due to road closures, semi trucks bunched up on each end of town like herds of elephants. Sunday church services and school was cancelled.

Finally, the wind died! Temperatures rose! Roads opened!

I went to town to stock up on groceries and needed items. Snow lay piled like miniature mountains all over town. The grocery store was full of shoppers because people hadn't been able to get out and about for days. Emerging from grocery, I noted the wind had started again — big time.

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As I headed home, I hoped the cattle guard from the county road into my lane hadn't blown full, but it was a futile hope. But, I have a stout 4-wheel drive pickup. Backing up a ways, I gave 'er the gun, shot forward and well, got stuck.

Dang. I reached in my pocket. Double dang! I'd forgotten my cell phone! A few curses later, I figured I could walk to the closest neighbor's — about an 8th of a mile up the lane. I'd use a cane for stability and as I descended from the truck, cane in hand, and eyeballed the path ahead.

At that point a pickup drove by, right on by. I cast dirty looks and a pox upon the driver. I took a couple of steps and the cane sank halfway up the shaft! It threw me off balance and I fell flat on my back next to the truck's front wheel. The view of the sky was fine, but at that moment I was unappreciative.

Using the crook end of my trusty cane, I hooked the bumper and pulled and scooched and scooched and pulled, aiming to draw myself to the pickup door. I figured I could lever up by hanging on to the fender and door handle but it was hard going.

When I scrunched forward, snow balled up as my derriere shoved snow ahead making a hump I'd have to get over. I flopped back again to reconnoiter and enjoy the view of the sky.

About then another truck drove by, but as I was lying flat on ground, he couldn't se me from his side of the road.

I waved my cane and yelled. That's when I saw the truck stop, the brake lights come on, then the backup lights.

The driver drew opposite, rolled down the window and called, "How's it goin'?"

"Not all that well," I called back. "I can't get up."

He debarked from his truck and tried to draw me to my feet by pulling on my hands. It didn't work; I couldn't get my feet under me. So he went behind me and lifted me up from the armpits.

We consulted and I asked, "Do you have a cell phone?" Since he did I said, "Call the snowplow" and told him the number. Of course all the plow operators were busy but they'd come out as soon as possible.

My rescuer said he'd try to get me unstuck or take me back into town. He commenced shoveling, then tried to reverse the pickup back onto the road, but no dice.

He said, "If I had a tow rope, I could probably pull you out."

I said, "Well, I have a couple of log chains." They were buried under snow in the pickup bed, but he dug through and found them.

About then, the pickup that had earlier driven on by without stopping appeared. Two people got out, each bearing a shovel. The driver had gone on to her place and fetched a scoop shovel and her kid. They both commenced digging.

My rescuer hitched chain from his truck to mine and after some jockeying, got the pickup free!

We exchanged names and I thanked them all. I then drove on toward town.

Halfway there, I met the plow and we both stopped. He grinned and asked, "You get snowed in again?"

I turned around and followed as he cleared the lane. I finally reached my house, thanked the snowplow driver, entered my dwelling, greeted the cats and fixed myself a restorative hot toddy.

So, how's it going where you live?❖