Peterson, Grassley cautious on E15, RIN rule | TheFencePost.com

Peterson, Grassley cautious on E15, RIN rule

-The Hagstrom Report

Two of the biggest advocates for ethanol in Congress — House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson, D-Minn., and Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, — were cautious about the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed rule to allow sales of E15 year round and to improve RIN market transparency.

"I applaud the EPA's release of this proposed rule," Peterson said. "It is long overdue and the result of much hard work on the part of U.S. farmers, the ethanol industry, and the Congressional Biofuels Caucus."

"The efforts to bring transparency to the RIN system are needed, but I'm afraid that connecting these two issues in one rule is going to bog down moving forward on both," Peterson said. "This would affect the E15 timeline and I would want to make sure it's done by summer driving season.

"And while I applaud the efforts in this rulemaking, it doesn't lessen the damage caused by the administration's misuse of the small refinery exemption.

"I encourage the administration to consider all options to advance the viability of our domestic biofuels industry, including a more efficient pathway process at EPA and ensuring access for biofuels in export markets," Peterson said.

Grassley said, "I'm still reviewing the proposed rule, and while I have some concerns about certain details, this is a significant step in the right direction and puts E15 on track for approval by summer driving season."

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"Ending the nonsensical ban on summertime sales of higher blends of ethanol is a no-brainer and a big victory for Iowa, Midwest farmers and the country as whole. It's also a promise made and a promise kept by President (Donald) Trump and Administrator (Andrew) Wheeler.

"Consumers should be able to choose what kind of fuel they want to use. Allowing year-round sales of higher blends of ethanol fits in well with President Trump's mission to end bureaucratic red tape, create jobs in rural America and establish American energy dominance through increased domestic production. The final rule should reflect those goals in keeping with President Trump's commitments."