Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Heats Up Colorado Springs | TheFencePost.com

Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Heats Up Colorado Springs

The PRCA's top ranked 2010 bareback cowboy Ryan Gray earned first place and over $5,000 with a fantastic ride aboard Harry Vold Rodeo's Sheep Tick on Saturday afternoon.

The 70th Annual Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo burned up the Norris Penrose Event Center arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., combining hot weather, top cowboys and a purse of over $200,000 to fire up big crowds July 14-17. With a substantial increase in ticket sales and its designation as a Wrangler Million Dollar Tour rodeo, organizers felt 2010 was a milestone offering in its long history.

“We thought it was probably one of the best rodeos we’ve had,” said Rick Powell, President of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Board. “Attendance was way up and we had the best contestants we’ve ever had.”

One of those competitors was bareback cowboy Ryan Gray, ranked number one coming into the rodeo and leaving with a buckle and over $5,000 after posting 87 points aboard Harry Vold Rodeo’s Sheep Tick on Saturday afternoon. Gray booked a flight into Colorado Springs after discovering the horse he drew, knowing Sheep Tick would give him a solid chance at a win.

“I’ve never actually been on that horse but I’ve wanted to,” began Gray about his reason for skipping other rodeos to make it to Colorado. “I spent a pretty good bit of money to come get on him because I knew he’d be worth it, so it worked out good. That’s a great horse.”

Not only was Sheep tick a great horse, Gray put on a great show in front of a roaring crowd, displaying good form and spurring action amid a storm of high-energy bucking.

“I never know exactly how many points I’m going to be when I get off,” said the humble cowboy about his thoughts immediately after the winning ride. “But you know when it felt good, you know when it felt right and everything kind of works. That’s a good feeling.”

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Gray wasn’t the only cowboy feeling good about the Colorado Springs rodeo. Wyoming competitor Seth Glause was also happy to bank a winning check after the conclusion of bull riding action.

“I was excited going into (the rodeo),” said Glause. “I knew that bull. I saw him a couple of times this winter and they were like 90 and 91 on him. I was pretty excited to have him … and he just stayed right there in the gate, turned back and kicking and it just worked out pretty good for me.”

Glause had as much praise for the long running rodeo as he did for the bull.

“It’s a great rodeo,” he stated without hesitation. “It’s one of the main circuit rodeos we try to go to every year. It always has good stock and good people around it and a great stock contractor, so it turns out to be a nice show. The Wrangler (Million Dollar) Tour is an awesome deal,” Glause added regarding the format within the PRCA that will bring a separate playoff and more money into the season before the all-important National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. “Any time you can win a check at one of them it just helps your season out so much.”

A cowboy who helped his season by bull dogging his way to third place despite a cracked bone and torn tendon was Colorado competitor Josh Peek. Injured at the beginning of July, the roper and steer wrestler is navigating the busy summer season with medication and pain tolerance, but he’s not letting it get in the way of his goal to make the NFR.

“We don’t get paid to sit at home,” reasoned Peek about competing through pain and injury. “The only way we make money is we pay an entry fee every day and go to that rodeo, and if we win at that rodeo, that’s how we pay our bills. It’s that time of the year when it’s crunch time,” he continued. “There’s a lot of money out on the circuit, there’s two months left to make the NFR and I can’t sit out for six weeks and still expect to make the NFR and pay my bills at home.”

With that kind of determination, Peek willed himself to third place with a pair of 4.3 second runs in a rodeo he tries not to miss.

“It’s awesome,” he said of the Colorado Springs venue. “I’ve always loved the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo. They do a really good job. They work hard at that rodeo and it’s kind of a hometown rodeo for me being 30 minutes from my house. They always have good cattle and that committee always does such a good job.”

Part of the equation in the rodeo’s success is having Harry Vold Rodeo provide the stock, something not lost on any of the contestants.

“There is so much more to stock contracting than people realize,” said Glause. “But Harry has been in it so long and he knows he wants to give everybody a shot to win. He’s just a great contractor and a great person and he knows rodeo inside and out.”

Rodeo officials appreciated the compliments by the cowboys as well as their event’s long-term association with Harry Vold Rodeo.

“They are one of the top contractors out there (and) they always bring great stock,” summed up Powell. “We think we have a top-notch rodeo … one of the best in the country. We just are proud that it’s still around for 70 years and it looks like we’ll go strong for quite a few more years.”

If 2010 was any indication; Powell is right and the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo will be blazing a trail through Colorado Springs for a long time to come.

Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Results:

• Bareback: Ryan Gray

• Saddle Bronc: Tyler Corrington

• Tie Down Roping: Matt Shiozawa

• Steer Wrestling: Casey Martin

• Team Roping: Clay Tryan/

Travis Graves

• Barrel Racing: Jill Moody

• Bull Riding: Seth Glause

The 70th Annual Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo burned up the Norris Penrose Event Center arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., combining hot weather, top cowboys and a purse of over $200,000 to fire up big crowds July 14-17. With a substantial increase in ticket sales and its designation as a Wrangler Million Dollar Tour rodeo, organizers felt 2010 was a milestone offering in its long history.

“We thought it was probably one of the best rodeos we’ve had,” said Rick Powell, President of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Board. “Attendance was way up and we had the best contestants we’ve ever had.”

One of those competitors was bareback cowboy Ryan Gray, ranked number one coming into the rodeo and leaving with a buckle and over $5,000 after posting 87 points aboard Harry Vold Rodeo’s Sheep Tick on Saturday afternoon. Gray booked a flight into Colorado Springs after discovering the horse he drew, knowing Sheep Tick would give him a solid chance at a win.

“I’ve never actually been on that horse but I’ve wanted to,” began Gray about his reason for skipping other rodeos to make it to Colorado. “I spent a pretty good bit of money to come get on him because I knew he’d be worth it, so it worked out good. That’s a great horse.”

Not only was Sheep tick a great horse, Gray put on a great show in front of a roaring crowd, displaying good form and spurring action amid a storm of high-energy bucking.

“I never know exactly how many points I’m going to be when I get off,” said the humble cowboy about his thoughts immediately after the winning ride. “But you know when it felt good, you know when it felt right and everything kind of works. That’s a good feeling.”

Gray wasn’t the only cowboy feeling good about the Colorado Springs rodeo. Wyoming competitor Seth Glause was also happy to bank a winning check after the conclusion of bull riding action.

“I was excited going into (the rodeo),” said Glause. “I knew that bull. I saw him a couple of times this winter and they were like 90 and 91 on him. I was pretty excited to have him … and he just stayed right there in the gate, turned back and kicking and it just worked out pretty good for me.”

Glause had as much praise for the long running rodeo as he did for the bull.

“It’s a great rodeo,” he stated without hesitation. “It’s one of the main circuit rodeos we try to go to every year. It always has good stock and good people around it and a great stock contractor, so it turns out to be a nice show. The Wrangler (Million Dollar) Tour is an awesome deal,” Glause added regarding the format within the PRCA that will bring a separate playoff and more money into the season before the all-important National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. “Any time you can win a check at one of them it just helps your season out so much.”

A cowboy who helped his season by bull dogging his way to third place despite a cracked bone and torn tendon was Colorado competitor Josh Peek. Injured at the beginning of July, the roper and steer wrestler is navigating the busy summer season with medication and pain tolerance, but he’s not letting it get in the way of his goal to make the NFR.

“We don’t get paid to sit at home,” reasoned Peek about competing through pain and injury. “The only way we make money is we pay an entry fee every day and go to that rodeo, and if we win at that rodeo, that’s how we pay our bills. It’s that time of the year when it’s crunch time,” he continued. “There’s a lot of money out on the circuit, there’s two months left to make the NFR and I can’t sit out for six weeks and still expect to make the NFR and pay my bills at home.”

With that kind of determination, Peek willed himself to third place with a pair of 4.3 second runs in a rodeo he tries not to miss.

“It’s awesome,” he said of the Colorado Springs venue. “I’ve always loved the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo. They do a really good job. They work hard at that rodeo and it’s kind of a hometown rodeo for me being 30 minutes from my house. They always have good cattle and that committee always does such a good job.”

Part of the equation in the rodeo’s success is having Harry Vold Rodeo provide the stock, something not lost on any of the contestants.

“There is so much more to stock contracting than people realize,” said Glause. “But Harry has been in it so long and he knows he wants to give everybody a shot to win. He’s just a great contractor and a great person and he knows rodeo inside and out.”

Rodeo officials appreciated the compliments by the cowboys as well as their event’s long-term association with Harry Vold Rodeo.

“They are one of the top contractors out there (and) they always bring great stock,” summed up Powell. “We think we have a top-notch rodeo … one of the best in the country. We just are proud that it’s still around for 70 years and it looks like we’ll go strong for quite a few more years.”

If 2010 was any indication; Powell is right and the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo will be blazing a trail through Colorado Springs for a long time to come.

Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Results:

• Bareback: Ryan Gray

• Saddle Bronc: Tyler Corrington

• Tie Down Roping: Matt Shiozawa

• Steer Wrestling: Casey Martin

• Team Roping: Clay Tryan/

Travis Graves

• Barrel Racing: Jill Moody

• Bull Riding: Seth Glause

The 70th Annual Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo burned up the Norris Penrose Event Center arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., combining hot weather, top cowboys and a purse of over $200,000 to fire up big crowds July 14-17. With a substantial increase in ticket sales and its designation as a Wrangler Million Dollar Tour rodeo, organizers felt 2010 was a milestone offering in its long history.

“We thought it was probably one of the best rodeos we’ve had,” said Rick Powell, President of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Board. “Attendance was way up and we had the best contestants we’ve ever had.”

One of those competitors was bareback cowboy Ryan Gray, ranked number one coming into the rodeo and leaving with a buckle and over $5,000 after posting 87 points aboard Harry Vold Rodeo’s Sheep Tick on Saturday afternoon. Gray booked a flight into Colorado Springs after discovering the horse he drew, knowing Sheep Tick would give him a solid chance at a win.

“I’ve never actually been on that horse but I’ve wanted to,” began Gray about his reason for skipping other rodeos to make it to Colorado. “I spent a pretty good bit of money to come get on him because I knew he’d be worth it, so it worked out good. That’s a great horse.”

Not only was Sheep tick a great horse, Gray put on a great show in front of a roaring crowd, displaying good form and spurring action amid a storm of high-energy bucking.

“I never know exactly how many points I’m going to be when I get off,” said the humble cowboy about his thoughts immediately after the winning ride. “But you know when it felt good, you know when it felt right and everything kind of works. That’s a good feeling.”

Gray wasn’t the only cowboy feeling good about the Colorado Springs rodeo. Wyoming competitor Seth Glause was also happy to bank a winning check after the conclusion of bull riding action.

“I was excited going into (the rodeo),” said Glause. “I knew that bull. I saw him a couple of times this winter and they were like 90 and 91 on him. I was pretty excited to have him … and he just stayed right there in the gate, turned back and kicking and it just worked out pretty good for me.”

Glause had as much praise for the long running rodeo as he did for the bull.

“It’s a great rodeo,” he stated without hesitation. “It’s one of the main circuit rodeos we try to go to every year. It always has good stock and good people around it and a great stock contractor, so it turns out to be a nice show. The Wrangler (Million Dollar) Tour is an awesome deal,” Glause added regarding the format within the PRCA that will bring a separate playoff and more money into the season before the all-important National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. “Any time you can win a check at one of them it just helps your season out so much.”

A cowboy who helped his season by bull dogging his way to third place despite a cracked bone and torn tendon was Colorado competitor Josh Peek. Injured at the beginning of July, the roper and steer wrestler is navigating the busy summer season with medication and pain tolerance, but he’s not letting it get in the way of his goal to make the NFR.

“We don’t get paid to sit at home,” reasoned Peek about competing through pain and injury. “The only way we make money is we pay an entry fee every day and go to that rodeo, and if we win at that rodeo, that’s how we pay our bills. It’s that time of the year when it’s crunch time,” he continued. “There’s a lot of money out on the circuit, there’s two months left to make the NFR and I can’t sit out for six weeks and still expect to make the NFR and pay my bills at home.”

With that kind of determination, Peek willed himself to third place with a pair of 4.3 second runs in a rodeo he tries not to miss.

“It’s awesome,” he said of the Colorado Springs venue. “I’ve always loved the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo. They do a really good job. They work hard at that rodeo and it’s kind of a hometown rodeo for me being 30 minutes from my house. They always have good cattle and that committee always does such a good job.”

Part of the equation in the rodeo’s success is having Harry Vold Rodeo provide the stock, something not lost on any of the contestants.

“There is so much more to stock contracting than people realize,” said Glause. “But Harry has been in it so long and he knows he wants to give everybody a shot to win. He’s just a great contractor and a great person and he knows rodeo inside and out.”

Rodeo officials appreciated the compliments by the cowboys as well as their event’s long-term association with Harry Vold Rodeo.

“They are one of the top contractors out there (and) they always bring great stock,” summed up Powell. “We think we have a top-notch rodeo … one of the best in the country. We just are proud that it’s still around for 70 years and it looks like we’ll go strong for quite a few more years.”

If 2010 was any indication; Powell is right and the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo will be blazing a trail through Colorado Springs for a long time to come.

Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Results:

• Bareback: Ryan Gray

• Saddle Bronc: Tyler Corrington

• Tie Down Roping: Matt Shiozawa

• Steer Wrestling: Casey Martin

• Team Roping: Clay Tryan/

Travis Graves

• Barrel Racing: Jill Moody

• Bull Riding: Seth Glause

The 70th Annual Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo burned up the Norris Penrose Event Center arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., combining hot weather, top cowboys and a purse of over $200,000 to fire up big crowds July 14-17. With a substantial increase in ticket sales and its designation as a Wrangler Million Dollar Tour rodeo, organizers felt 2010 was a milestone offering in its long history.

“We thought it was probably one of the best rodeos we’ve had,” said Rick Powell, President of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Board. “Attendance was way up and we had the best contestants we’ve ever had.”

One of those competitors was bareback cowboy Ryan Gray, ranked number one coming into the rodeo and leaving with a buckle and over $5,000 after posting 87 points aboard Harry Vold Rodeo’s Sheep Tick on Saturday afternoon. Gray booked a flight into Colorado Springs after discovering the horse he drew, knowing Sheep Tick would give him a solid chance at a win.

“I’ve never actually been on that horse but I’ve wanted to,” began Gray about his reason for skipping other rodeos to make it to Colorado. “I spent a pretty good bit of money to come get on him because I knew he’d be worth it, so it worked out good. That’s a great horse.”

Not only was Sheep tick a great horse, Gray put on a great show in front of a roaring crowd, displaying good form and spurring action amid a storm of high-energy bucking.

“I never know exactly how many points I’m going to be when I get off,” said the humble cowboy about his thoughts immediately after the winning ride. “But you know when it felt good, you know when it felt right and everything kind of works. That’s a good feeling.”

Gray wasn’t the only cowboy feeling good about the Colorado Springs rodeo. Wyoming competitor Seth Glause was also happy to bank a winning check after the conclusion of bull riding action.

“I was excited going into (the rodeo),” said Glause. “I knew that bull. I saw him a couple of times this winter and they were like 90 and 91 on him. I was pretty excited to have him … and he just stayed right there in the gate, turned back and kicking and it just worked out pretty good for me.”

Glause had as much praise for the long running rodeo as he did for the bull.

“It’s a great rodeo,” he stated without hesitation. “It’s one of the main circuit rodeos we try to go to every year. It always has good stock and good people around it and a great stock contractor, so it turns out to be a nice show. The Wrangler (Million Dollar) Tour is an awesome deal,” Glause added regarding the format within the PRCA that will bring a separate playoff and more money into the season before the all-important National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. “Any time you can win a check at one of them it just helps your season out so much.”

A cowboy who helped his season by bull dogging his way to third place despite a cracked bone and torn tendon was Colorado competitor Josh Peek. Injured at the beginning of July, the roper and steer wrestler is navigating the busy summer season with medication and pain tolerance, but he’s not letting it get in the way of his goal to make the NFR.

“We don’t get paid to sit at home,” reasoned Peek about competing through pain and injury. “The only way we make money is we pay an entry fee every day and go to that rodeo, and if we win at that rodeo, that’s how we pay our bills. It’s that time of the year when it’s crunch time,” he continued. “There’s a lot of money out on the circuit, there’s two months left to make the NFR and I can’t sit out for six weeks and still expect to make the NFR and pay my bills at home.”

With that kind of determination, Peek willed himself to third place with a pair of 4.3 second runs in a rodeo he tries not to miss.

“It’s awesome,” he said of the Colorado Springs venue. “I’ve always loved the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo. They do a really good job. They work hard at that rodeo and it’s kind of a hometown rodeo for me being 30 minutes from my house. They always have good cattle and that committee always does such a good job.”

Part of the equation in the rodeo’s success is having Harry Vold Rodeo provide the stock, something not lost on any of the contestants.

“There is so much more to stock contracting than people realize,” said Glause. “But Harry has been in it so long and he knows he wants to give everybody a shot to win. He’s just a great contractor and a great person and he knows rodeo inside and out.”

Rodeo officials appreciated the compliments by the cowboys as well as their event’s long-term association with Harry Vold Rodeo.

“They are one of the top contractors out there (and) they always bring great stock,” summed up Powell. “We think we have a top-notch rodeo … one of the best in the country. We just are proud that it’s still around for 70 years and it looks like we’ll go strong for quite a few more years.”

If 2010 was any indication; Powell is right and the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo will be blazing a trail through Colorado Springs for a long time to come.

Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Results:

• Bareback: Ryan Gray

• Saddle Bronc: Tyler Corrington

• Tie Down Roping: Matt Shiozawa

• Steer Wrestling: Casey Martin

• Team Roping: Clay Tryan/

Travis Graves

• Barrel Racing: Jill Moody

• Bull Riding: Seth Glause

The 70th Annual Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo burned up the Norris Penrose Event Center arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., combining hot weather, top cowboys and a purse of over $200,000 to fire up big crowds July 14-17. With a substantial increase in ticket sales and its designation as a Wrangler Million Dollar Tour rodeo, organizers felt 2010 was a milestone offering in its long history.

“We thought it was probably one of the best rodeos we’ve had,” said Rick Powell, President of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Board. “Attendance was way up and we had the best contestants we’ve ever had.”

One of those competitors was bareback cowboy Ryan Gray, ranked number one coming into the rodeo and leaving with a buckle and over $5,000 after posting 87 points aboard Harry Vold Rodeo’s Sheep Tick on Saturday afternoon. Gray booked a flight into Colorado Springs after discovering the horse he drew, knowing Sheep Tick would give him a solid chance at a win.

“I’ve never actually been on that horse but I’ve wanted to,” began Gray about his reason for skipping other rodeos to make it to Colorado. “I spent a pretty good bit of money to come get on him because I knew he’d be worth it, so it worked out good. That’s a great horse.”

Not only was Sheep tick a great horse, Gray put on a great show in front of a roaring crowd, displaying good form and spurring action amid a storm of high-energy bucking.

“I never know exactly how many points I’m going to be when I get off,” said the humble cowboy about his thoughts immediately after the winning ride. “But you know when it felt good, you know when it felt right and everything kind of works. That’s a good feeling.”

Gray wasn’t the only cowboy feeling good about the Colorado Springs rodeo. Wyoming competitor Seth Glause was also happy to bank a winning check after the conclusion of bull riding action.

“I was excited going into (the rodeo),” said Glause. “I knew that bull. I saw him a couple of times this winter and they were like 90 and 91 on him. I was pretty excited to have him … and he just stayed right there in the gate, turned back and kicking and it just worked out pretty good for me.”

Glause had as much praise for the long running rodeo as he did for the bull.

“It’s a great rodeo,” he stated without hesitation. “It’s one of the main circuit rodeos we try to go to every year. It always has good stock and good people around it and a great stock contractor, so it turns out to be a nice show. The Wrangler (Million Dollar) Tour is an awesome deal,” Glause added regarding the format within the PRCA that will bring a separate playoff and more money into the season before the all-important National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. “Any time you can win a check at one of them it just helps your season out so much.”

A cowboy who helped his season by bull dogging his way to third place despite a cracked bone and torn tendon was Colorado competitor Josh Peek. Injured at the beginning of July, the roper and steer wrestler is navigating the busy summer season with medication and pain tolerance, but he’s not letting it get in the way of his goal to make the NFR.

“We don’t get paid to sit at home,” reasoned Peek about competing through pain and injury. “The only way we make money is we pay an entry fee every day and go to that rodeo, and if we win at that rodeo, that’s how we pay our bills. It’s that time of the year when it’s crunch time,” he continued. “There’s a lot of money out on the circuit, there’s two months left to make the NFR and I can’t sit out for six weeks and still expect to make the NFR and pay my bills at home.”

With that kind of determination, Peek willed himself to third place with a pair of 4.3 second runs in a rodeo he tries not to miss.

“It’s awesome,” he said of the Colorado Springs venue. “I’ve always loved the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo. They do a really good job. They work hard at that rodeo and it’s kind of a hometown rodeo for me being 30 minutes from my house. They always have good cattle and that committee always does such a good job.”

Part of the equation in the rodeo’s success is having Harry Vold Rodeo provide the stock, something not lost on any of the contestants.

“There is so much more to stock contracting than people realize,” said Glause. “But Harry has been in it so long and he knows he wants to give everybody a shot to win. He’s just a great contractor and a great person and he knows rodeo inside and out.”

Rodeo officials appreciated the compliments by the cowboys as well as their event’s long-term association with Harry Vold Rodeo.

“They are one of the top contractors out there (and) they always bring great stock,” summed up Powell. “We think we have a top-notch rodeo … one of the best in the country. We just are proud that it’s still around for 70 years and it looks like we’ll go strong for quite a few more years.”

If 2010 was any indication; Powell is right and the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo will be blazing a trail through Colorado Springs for a long time to come.

Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Results:

• Bareback: Ryan Gray

• Saddle Bronc: Tyler Corrington

• Tie Down Roping: Matt Shiozawa

• Steer Wrestling: Casey Martin

• Team Roping: Clay Tryan/

Travis Graves

• Barrel Racing: Jill Moody

• Bull Riding: Seth Glause

The 70th Annual Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo burned up the Norris Penrose Event Center arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., combining hot weather, top cowboys and a purse of over $200,000 to fire up big crowds July 14-17. With a substantial increase in ticket sales and its designation as a Wrangler Million Dollar Tour rodeo, organizers felt 2010 was a milestone offering in its long history.

“We thought it was probably one of the best rodeos we’ve had,” said Rick Powell, President of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Board. “Attendance was way up and we had the best contestants we’ve ever had.”

One of those competitors was bareback cowboy Ryan Gray, ranked number one coming into the rodeo and leaving with a buckle and over $5,000 after posting 87 points aboard Harry Vold Rodeo’s Sheep Tick on Saturday afternoon. Gray booked a flight into Colorado Springs after discovering the horse he drew, knowing Sheep Tick would give him a solid chance at a win.

“I’ve never actually been on that horse but I’ve wanted to,” began Gray about his reason for skipping other rodeos to make it to Colorado. “I spent a pretty good bit of money to come get on him because I knew he’d be worth it, so it worked out good. That’s a great horse.”

Not only was Sheep tick a great horse, Gray put on a great show in front of a roaring crowd, displaying good form and spurring action amid a storm of high-energy bucking.

“I never know exactly how many points I’m going to be when I get off,” said the humble cowboy about his thoughts immediately after the winning ride. “But you know when it felt good, you know when it felt right and everything kind of works. That’s a good feeling.”

Gray wasn’t the only cowboy feeling good about the Colorado Springs rodeo. Wyoming competitor Seth Glause was also happy to bank a winning check after the conclusion of bull riding action.

“I was excited going into (the rodeo),” said Glause. “I knew that bull. I saw him a couple of times this winter and they were like 90 and 91 on him. I was pretty excited to have him … and he just stayed right there in the gate, turned back and kicking and it just worked out pretty good for me.”

Glause had as much praise for the long running rodeo as he did for the bull.

“It’s a great rodeo,” he stated without hesitation. “It’s one of the main circuit rodeos we try to go to every year. It always has good stock and good people around it and a great stock contractor, so it turns out to be a nice show. The Wrangler (Million Dollar) Tour is an awesome deal,” Glause added regarding the format within the PRCA that will bring a separate playoff and more money into the season before the all-important National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. “Any time you can win a check at one of them it just helps your season out so much.”

A cowboy who helped his season by bull dogging his way to third place despite a cracked bone and torn tendon was Colorado competitor Josh Peek. Injured at the beginning of July, the roper and steer wrestler is navigating the busy summer season with medication and pain tolerance, but he’s not letting it get in the way of his goal to make the NFR.

“We don’t get paid to sit at home,” reasoned Peek about competing through pain and injury. “The only way we make money is we pay an entry fee every day and go to that rodeo, and if we win at that rodeo, that’s how we pay our bills. It’s that time of the year when it’s crunch time,” he continued. “There’s a lot of money out on the circuit, there’s two months left to make the NFR and I can’t sit out for six weeks and still expect to make the NFR and pay my bills at home.”

With that kind of determination, Peek willed himself to third place with a pair of 4.3 second runs in a rodeo he tries not to miss.

“It’s awesome,” he said of the Colorado Springs venue. “I’ve always loved the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo. They do a really good job. They work hard at that rodeo and it’s kind of a hometown rodeo for me being 30 minutes from my house. They always have good cattle and that committee always does such a good job.”

Part of the equation in the rodeo’s success is having Harry Vold Rodeo provide the stock, something not lost on any of the contestants.

“There is so much more to stock contracting than people realize,” said Glause. “But Harry has been in it so long and he knows he wants to give everybody a shot to win. He’s just a great contractor and a great person and he knows rodeo inside and out.”

Rodeo officials appreciated the compliments by the cowboys as well as their event’s long-term association with Harry Vold Rodeo.

“They are one of the top contractors out there (and) they always bring great stock,” summed up Powell. “We think we have a top-notch rodeo … one of the best in the country. We just are proud that it’s still around for 70 years and it looks like we’ll go strong for quite a few more years.”

If 2010 was any indication; Powell is right and the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo will be blazing a trail through Colorado Springs for a long time to come.

Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Results:

• Bareback: Ryan Gray

• Saddle Bronc: Tyler Corrington

• Tie Down Roping: Matt Shiozawa

• Steer Wrestling: Casey Martin

• Team Roping: Clay Tryan/

Travis Graves

• Barrel Racing: Jill Moody

• Bull Riding: Seth Glause

The 70th Annual Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo burned up the Norris Penrose Event Center arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., combining hot weather, top cowboys and a purse of over $200,000 to fire up big crowds July 14-17. With a substantial increase in ticket sales and its designation as a Wrangler Million Dollar Tour rodeo, organizers felt 2010 was a milestone offering in its long history.

“We thought it was probably one of the best rodeos we’ve had,” said Rick Powell, President of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Board. “Attendance was way up and we had the best contestants we’ve ever had.”

One of those competitors was bareback cowboy Ryan Gray, ranked number one coming into the rodeo and leaving with a buckle and over $5,000 after posting 87 points aboard Harry Vold Rodeo’s Sheep Tick on Saturday afternoon. Gray booked a flight into Colorado Springs after discovering the horse he drew, knowing Sheep Tick would give him a solid chance at a win.

“I’ve never actually been on that horse but I’ve wanted to,” began Gray about his reason for skipping other rodeos to make it to Colorado. “I spent a pretty good bit of money to come get on him because I knew he’d be worth it, so it worked out good. That’s a great horse.”

Not only was Sheep tick a great horse, Gray put on a great show in front of a roaring crowd, displaying good form and spurring action amid a storm of high-energy bucking.

“I never know exactly how many points I’m going to be when I get off,” said the humble cowboy about his thoughts immediately after the winning ride. “But you know when it felt good, you know when it felt right and everything kind of works. That’s a good feeling.”

Gray wasn’t the only cowboy feeling good about the Colorado Springs rodeo. Wyoming competitor Seth Glause was also happy to bank a winning check after the conclusion of bull riding action.

“I was excited going into (the rodeo),” said Glause. “I knew that bull. I saw him a couple of times this winter and they were like 90 and 91 on him. I was pretty excited to have him … and he just stayed right there in the gate, turned back and kicking and it just worked out pretty good for me.”

Glause had as much praise for the long running rodeo as he did for the bull.

“It’s a great rodeo,” he stated without hesitation. “It’s one of the main circuit rodeos we try to go to every year. It always has good stock and good people around it and a great stock contractor, so it turns out to be a nice show. The Wrangler (Million Dollar) Tour is an awesome deal,” Glause added regarding the format within the PRCA that will bring a separate playoff and more money into the season before the all-important National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. “Any time you can win a check at one of them it just helps your season out so much.”

A cowboy who helped his season by bull dogging his way to third place despite a cracked bone and torn tendon was Colorado competitor Josh Peek. Injured at the beginning of July, the roper and steer wrestler is navigating the busy summer season with medication and pain tolerance, but he’s not letting it get in the way of his goal to make the NFR.

“We don’t get paid to sit at home,” reasoned Peek about competing through pain and injury. “The only way we make money is we pay an entry fee every day and go to that rodeo, and if we win at that rodeo, that’s how we pay our bills. It’s that time of the year when it’s crunch time,” he continued. “There’s a lot of money out on the circuit, there’s two months left to make the NFR and I can’t sit out for six weeks and still expect to make the NFR and pay my bills at home.”

With that kind of determination, Peek willed himself to third place with a pair of 4.3 second runs in a rodeo he tries not to miss.

“It’s awesome,” he said of the Colorado Springs venue. “I’ve always loved the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo. They do a really good job. They work hard at that rodeo and it’s kind of a hometown rodeo for me being 30 minutes from my house. They always have good cattle and that committee always does such a good job.”

Part of the equation in the rodeo’s success is having Harry Vold Rodeo provide the stock, something not lost on any of the contestants.

“There is so much more to stock contracting than people realize,” said Glause. “But Harry has been in it so long and he knows he wants to give everybody a shot to win. He’s just a great contractor and a great person and he knows rodeo inside and out.”

Rodeo officials appreciated the compliments by the cowboys as well as their event’s long-term association with Harry Vold Rodeo.

“They are one of the top contractors out there (and) they always bring great stock,” summed up Powell. “We think we have a top-notch rodeo … one of the best in the country. We just are proud that it’s still around for 70 years and it looks like we’ll go strong for quite a few more years.”

If 2010 was any indication; Powell is right and the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo will be blazing a trail through Colorado Springs for a long time to come.

Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Results:

• Bareback: Ryan Gray

• Saddle Bronc: Tyler Corrington

• Tie Down Roping: Matt Shiozawa

• Steer Wrestling: Casey Martin

• Team Roping: Clay Tryan/

Travis Graves

• Barrel Racing: Jill Moody

• Bull Riding: Seth Glause

The 70th Annual Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo burned up the Norris Penrose Event Center arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., combining hot weather, top cowboys and a purse of over $200,000 to fire up big crowds July 14-17. With a substantial increase in ticket sales and its designation as a Wrangler Million Dollar Tour rodeo, organizers felt 2010 was a milestone offering in its long history.

“We thought it was probably one of the best rodeos we’ve had,” said Rick Powell, President of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Board. “Attendance was way up and we had the best contestants we’ve ever had.”

One of those competitors was bareback cowboy Ryan Gray, ranked number one coming into the rodeo and leaving with a buckle and over $5,000 after posting 87 points aboard Harry Vold Rodeo’s Sheep Tick on Saturday afternoon. Gray booked a flight into Colorado Springs after discovering the horse he drew, knowing Sheep Tick would give him a solid chance at a win.

“I’ve never actually been on that horse but I’ve wanted to,” began Gray about his reason for skipping other rodeos to make it to Colorado. “I spent a pretty good bit of money to come get on him because I knew he’d be worth it, so it worked out good. That’s a great horse.”

Not only was Sheep tick a great horse, Gray put on a great show in front of a roaring crowd, displaying good form and spurring action amid a storm of high-energy bucking.

“I never know exactly how many points I’m going to be when I get off,” said the humble cowboy about his thoughts immediately after the winning ride. “But you know when it felt good, you know when it felt right and everything kind of works. That’s a good feeling.”

Gray wasn’t the only cowboy feeling good about the Colorado Springs rodeo. Wyoming competitor Seth Glause was also happy to bank a winning check after the conclusion of bull riding action.

“I was excited going into (the rodeo),” said Glause. “I knew that bull. I saw him a couple of times this winter and they were like 90 and 91 on him. I was pretty excited to have him … and he just stayed right there in the gate, turned back and kicking and it just worked out pretty good for me.”

Glause had as much praise for the long running rodeo as he did for the bull.

“It’s a great rodeo,” he stated without hesitation. “It’s one of the main circuit rodeos we try to go to every year. It always has good stock and good people around it and a great stock contractor, so it turns out to be a nice show. The Wrangler (Million Dollar) Tour is an awesome deal,” Glause added regarding the format within the PRCA that will bring a separate playoff and more money into the season before the all-important National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. “Any time you can win a check at one of them it just helps your season out so much.”

A cowboy who helped his season by bull dogging his way to third place despite a cracked bone and torn tendon was Colorado competitor Josh Peek. Injured at the beginning of July, the roper and steer wrestler is navigating the busy summer season with medication and pain tolerance, but he’s not letting it get in the way of his goal to make the NFR.

“We don’t get paid to sit at home,” reasoned Peek about competing through pain and injury. “The only way we make money is we pay an entry fee every day and go to that rodeo, and if we win at that rodeo, that’s how we pay our bills. It’s that time of the year when it’s crunch time,” he continued. “There’s a lot of money out on the circuit, there’s two months left to make the NFR and I can’t sit out for six weeks and still expect to make the NFR and pay my bills at home.”

With that kind of determination, Peek willed himself to third place with a pair of 4.3 second runs in a rodeo he tries not to miss.

“It’s awesome,” he said of the Colorado Springs venue. “I’ve always loved the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo. They do a really good job. They work hard at that rodeo and it’s kind of a hometown rodeo for me being 30 minutes from my house. They always have good cattle and that committee always does such a good job.”

Part of the equation in the rodeo’s success is having Harry Vold Rodeo provide the stock, something not lost on any of the contestants.

“There is so much more to stock contracting than people realize,” said Glause. “But Harry has been in it so long and he knows he wants to give everybody a shot to win. He’s just a great contractor and a great person and he knows rodeo inside and out.”

Rodeo officials appreciated the compliments by the cowboys as well as their event’s long-term association with Harry Vold Rodeo.

“They are one of the top contractors out there (and) they always bring great stock,” summed up Powell. “We think we have a top-notch rodeo … one of the best in the country. We just are proud that it’s still around for 70 years and it looks like we’ll go strong for quite a few more years.”

If 2010 was any indication; Powell is right and the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo will be blazing a trail through Colorado Springs for a long time to come.

Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Results:

• Bareback: Ryan Gray

• Saddle Bronc: Tyler Corrington

• Tie Down Roping: Matt Shiozawa

• Steer Wrestling: Casey Martin

• Team Roping: Clay Tryan/

Travis Graves

• Barrel Racing: Jill Moody

• Bull Riding: Seth Glause