Plains Edition USDA Information for 1-8-11 | TheFencePost.com

Plains Edition USDA Information for 1-8-11

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending December, 2010

Weather conditions were relatively mild and dry compared to the same month last year, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Average temperatures were warmest in the southern Panhandle and far southwest counties and coolest as you moved north and east across the state. Depth of snow at the end of December averaged 2-3 inches across the state, with 6 inches or more common across northern Panhandle and north central counties and little or no snow depth over east central and southeastern areas.

The northern half of the state received above normal amounts of precipitation while the southern half was below normal. Wheat condition continued well below year ago levels. Cattle producers made good use of stalks as snow cover was light. As a result, feed usage was not heavy. Feed supplies are more than adequate and cattle are in good condition.

Temperatures averaged 2-3 degrees above normal across the western half of the state but 1-2 degrees below normal for the eastern half. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 27 to 34 degrees and in general got warmer as you moved west to east across the state. Precipitation was less than one-half inch over the southern half of the state and generally less than one inch elsewhere.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 2 percent very poor, 12 poor, 44 fair, 38 good, and 4 excellent, well below last year when 65 percent of the crop rated good or excellent. Hay and forage supplies rated 0 percent very short, 2 short, 94 adequate, and 4 excellent, above a year ago.

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Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 0 poor, 13 fair, 78 good, and 9 excellent, above last year’s 78 percent good or excellent.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and County Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Three days of blizzard didn’t leave behind a lot of snow but cold winds could have put some stress on bare wheat fields.

NORTHEAST: Bitter cold temperatures in the area. Snow and cold have resulted in the need to feed cattle in stalks while most of the cow herds have been moved out of stalks as a result of drifted snow on fences. Plenty of hay for now.

EAST CENTRAL: Mild winter so far is keeping feed usage down and cattle condition up. Even some low temperatures haven’t affected the cattle and they are in great shape. Little feed usage so far, as corn droppage from wind storms and open winter providing cattle with plenty of feed.

SOUTHWEST: The temperature has turned cold with about 6 inches of snow on the ground. Some beef producers are feeding hay to their cattle.

SOUTH CENTRAL: The area has not had any moisture for several months. Soil and crop (wheat) conditions are dry. Cattle on stocks look good. Weather has not been severe so hay supplies are good yet.

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending December, 2010

Weather conditions were relatively mild and dry compared to the same month last year, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Average temperatures were warmest in the southern Panhandle and far southwest counties and coolest as you moved north and east across the state. Depth of snow at the end of December averaged 2-3 inches across the state, with 6 inches or more common across northern Panhandle and north central counties and little or no snow depth over east central and southeastern areas.

The northern half of the state received above normal amounts of precipitation while the southern half was below normal. Wheat condition continued well below year ago levels. Cattle producers made good use of stalks as snow cover was light. As a result, feed usage was not heavy. Feed supplies are more than adequate and cattle are in good condition.

Temperatures averaged 2-3 degrees above normal across the western half of the state but 1-2 degrees below normal for the eastern half. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 27 to 34 degrees and in general got warmer as you moved west to east across the state. Precipitation was less than one-half inch over the southern half of the state and generally less than one inch elsewhere.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 2 percent very poor, 12 poor, 44 fair, 38 good, and 4 excellent, well below last year when 65 percent of the crop rated good or excellent. Hay and forage supplies rated 0 percent very short, 2 short, 94 adequate, and 4 excellent, above a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 0 poor, 13 fair, 78 good, and 9 excellent, above last year’s 78 percent good or excellent.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and County Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Three days of blizzard didn’t leave behind a lot of snow but cold winds could have put some stress on bare wheat fields.

NORTHEAST: Bitter cold temperatures in the area. Snow and cold have resulted in the need to feed cattle in stalks while most of the cow herds have been moved out of stalks as a result of drifted snow on fences. Plenty of hay for now.

EAST CENTRAL: Mild winter so far is keeping feed usage down and cattle condition up. Even some low temperatures haven’t affected the cattle and they are in great shape. Little feed usage so far, as corn droppage from wind storms and open winter providing cattle with plenty of feed.

SOUTHWEST: The temperature has turned cold with about 6 inches of snow on the ground. Some beef producers are feeding hay to their cattle.

SOUTH CENTRAL: The area has not had any moisture for several months. Soil and crop (wheat) conditions are dry. Cattle on stocks look good. Weather has not been severe so hay supplies are good yet.

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending December, 2010

Weather conditions were relatively mild and dry compared to the same month last year, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Average temperatures were warmest in the southern Panhandle and far southwest counties and coolest as you moved north and east across the state. Depth of snow at the end of December averaged 2-3 inches across the state, with 6 inches or more common across northern Panhandle and north central counties and little or no snow depth over east central and southeastern areas.

The northern half of the state received above normal amounts of precipitation while the southern half was below normal. Wheat condition continued well below year ago levels. Cattle producers made good use of stalks as snow cover was light. As a result, feed usage was not heavy. Feed supplies are more than adequate and cattle are in good condition.

Temperatures averaged 2-3 degrees above normal across the western half of the state but 1-2 degrees below normal for the eastern half. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 27 to 34 degrees and in general got warmer as you moved west to east across the state. Precipitation was less than one-half inch over the southern half of the state and generally less than one inch elsewhere.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 2 percent very poor, 12 poor, 44 fair, 38 good, and 4 excellent, well below last year when 65 percent of the crop rated good or excellent. Hay and forage supplies rated 0 percent very short, 2 short, 94 adequate, and 4 excellent, above a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 0 poor, 13 fair, 78 good, and 9 excellent, above last year’s 78 percent good or excellent.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and County Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Three days of blizzard didn’t leave behind a lot of snow but cold winds could have put some stress on bare wheat fields.

NORTHEAST: Bitter cold temperatures in the area. Snow and cold have resulted in the need to feed cattle in stalks while most of the cow herds have been moved out of stalks as a result of drifted snow on fences. Plenty of hay for now.

EAST CENTRAL: Mild winter so far is keeping feed usage down and cattle condition up. Even some low temperatures haven’t affected the cattle and they are in great shape. Little feed usage so far, as corn droppage from wind storms and open winter providing cattle with plenty of feed.

SOUTHWEST: The temperature has turned cold with about 6 inches of snow on the ground. Some beef producers are feeding hay to their cattle.

SOUTH CENTRAL: The area has not had any moisture for several months. Soil and crop (wheat) conditions are dry. Cattle on stocks look good. Weather has not been severe so hay supplies are good yet.