Plains Edition USDA Information for 2-5-11 | TheFencePost.com
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Plains Edition USDA Information for 2-5-11

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending January, 2011

Temperatures averaged below normal with above normal precipitation across the eastern two-thirds of the state, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Precipitation was light during January across the Panhandle and southwest with less than .5 inch recorded. Elsewhere, one to one and a half inches were common, bringing much needed moisture. At the end of the month, snow depth was limited across the western third of the State, while eastern counties averaged three to six inches of snow cover.

Hauling grain to market and livestock care were the main activities during the month. Wheat condition continued well below year ago levels. Producers have started supplemental feeding of cattle due to snow cover with feed supplies adequate. Cattle are in good condition with the first calves of the season being born.

Above normal precipitation fell during January across most of the state. Average snow depth at the end of January averaged 3.9 inches statewide. By region, snow depth was the lightest in the Panhandle and southwest counties and increased in depth across the state.

Temperatures averaged above normal at the beginning of the month while below normal in the middle and end of the month. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 27 degrees in the extreme northeast to 33 degrees in some southwestern counties.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 2 percent very poor, 13 poor, 44 fair, 36 good, and 5 excellent, below last year.

Hay and forage supplies rated 0 percent very short, 3 short, 95 adequate, and 2 surplus, above a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 13 fair, 79 good, and 7 excellent, above last year.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and County Extension Educators:

NORTHEAST: Snow cover has caused most cattle producers to feed greater than normal supplemental feed. Icy roads have delayed marketing of some grain. Early calving has started.

CENTRAL: A few new calves on the ground. Calving weather typical for this time of year, cold, warm, wet, snowy, nice. Most farmers nervously optimistic about the coming crop season.

EAST CENTRAL: Several days of above freezing weather has melted away quite a bit of the snow. Grain continues to be hauled to the elevators. Cold weather has slowed gains for the beef cattle and supplemental feeding by cow/calf operations continues because of heavy snow cover in the fields.

SOUTH CENTRAL: The snow is nearly gone now but the bitter cold is hanging in there making it tough on the new calves being born. Grains are being hauled in to fulfill contracts.

SOUTHEAST: Wheat conditions are questionable at this time. Eight to twelve inches of snow have fallen during the month.

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending January, 2011

Temperatures averaged below normal with above normal precipitation across the eastern two-thirds of the state, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Precipitation was light during January across the Panhandle and southwest with less than .5 inch recorded. Elsewhere, one to one and a half inches were common, bringing much needed moisture. At the end of the month, snow depth was limited across the western third of the State, while eastern counties averaged three to six inches of snow cover.

Hauling grain to market and livestock care were the main activities during the month. Wheat condition continued well below year ago levels. Producers have started supplemental feeding of cattle due to snow cover with feed supplies adequate. Cattle are in good condition with the first calves of the season being born.

Above normal precipitation fell during January across most of the state. Average snow depth at the end of January averaged 3.9 inches statewide. By region, snow depth was the lightest in the Panhandle and southwest counties and increased in depth across the state.

Temperatures averaged above normal at the beginning of the month while below normal in the middle and end of the month. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 27 degrees in the extreme northeast to 33 degrees in some southwestern counties.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 2 percent very poor, 13 poor, 44 fair, 36 good, and 5 excellent, below last year.

Hay and forage supplies rated 0 percent very short, 3 short, 95 adequate, and 2 surplus, above a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 13 fair, 79 good, and 7 excellent, above last year.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and County Extension Educators:

NORTHEAST: Snow cover has caused most cattle producers to feed greater than normal supplemental feed. Icy roads have delayed marketing of some grain. Early calving has started.

CENTRAL: A few new calves on the ground. Calving weather typical for this time of year, cold, warm, wet, snowy, nice. Most farmers nervously optimistic about the coming crop season.

EAST CENTRAL: Several days of above freezing weather has melted away quite a bit of the snow. Grain continues to be hauled to the elevators. Cold weather has slowed gains for the beef cattle and supplemental feeding by cow/calf operations continues because of heavy snow cover in the fields.

SOUTH CENTRAL: The snow is nearly gone now but the bitter cold is hanging in there making it tough on the new calves being born. Grains are being hauled in to fulfill contracts.

SOUTHEAST: Wheat conditions are questionable at this time. Eight to twelve inches of snow have fallen during the month.

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending January, 2011

Temperatures averaged below normal with above normal precipitation across the eastern two-thirds of the state, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Precipitation was light during January across the Panhandle and southwest with less than .5 inch recorded. Elsewhere, one to one and a half inches were common, bringing much needed moisture. At the end of the month, snow depth was limited across the western third of the State, while eastern counties averaged three to six inches of snow cover.

Hauling grain to market and livestock care were the main activities during the month. Wheat condition continued well below year ago levels. Producers have started supplemental feeding of cattle due to snow cover with feed supplies adequate. Cattle are in good condition with the first calves of the season being born.

Above normal precipitation fell during January across most of the state. Average snow depth at the end of January averaged 3.9 inches statewide. By region, snow depth was the lightest in the Panhandle and southwest counties and increased in depth across the state.

Temperatures averaged above normal at the beginning of the month while below normal in the middle and end of the month. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 27 degrees in the extreme northeast to 33 degrees in some southwestern counties.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 2 percent very poor, 13 poor, 44 fair, 36 good, and 5 excellent, below last year.

Hay and forage supplies rated 0 percent very short, 3 short, 95 adequate, and 2 surplus, above a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 13 fair, 79 good, and 7 excellent, above last year.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and County Extension Educators:

NORTHEAST: Snow cover has caused most cattle producers to feed greater than normal supplemental feed. Icy roads have delayed marketing of some grain. Early calving has started.

CENTRAL: A few new calves on the ground. Calving weather typical for this time of year, cold, warm, wet, snowy, nice. Most farmers nervously optimistic about the coming crop season.

EAST CENTRAL: Several days of above freezing weather has melted away quite a bit of the snow. Grain continues to be hauled to the elevators. Cold weather has slowed gains for the beef cattle and supplemental feeding by cow/calf operations continues because of heavy snow cover in the fields.

SOUTH CENTRAL: The snow is nearly gone now but the bitter cold is hanging in there making it tough on the new calves being born. Grains are being hauled in to fulfill contracts.

SOUTHEAST: Wheat conditions are questionable at this time. Eight to twelve inches of snow have fallen during the month.


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