Plains Edition USDA Information for 2-6-10 | TheFencePost.com

Plains Edition USDA Information for 2-6-10

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending January 2010

For the month of January 2010, above normal temperatures during the second and third weeks of the month brought some relief to livestock producers struggling to feed and care for livestock. Precipitation was light during January with much of the western two-thirds of the state receiving less than .25 inch. Snow depth was also limited in the western two thirds of the State, however, a foot or more was still being reported in portions of the northeast. Livestock care and marketing grain were the main activities during the month.

Average snow depth at the end of January was 3 inches statewide, less than half of the eight inches reported at the beginning of the month. However, snow depth varied widely by region. Temperatures averaged below normal the first and fourth weeks of the month and above normal during the middle. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 26 degrees in the extreme northwest to 32 degrees in parts of the southeast and east central counties.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 0 percent very poor, 6 poor, 39 fair, 51 good, and 4 excellent, below last year. Hay and forage supplies rated 1 percent very short, 13 short, 83 adequate, and 3 excellent, were also below a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 3 poor, 28 fair, 66 good, and 3 excellent, below last year.

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The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and Co. Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Snow fall ranged from 30 inches to only 5 inches throughout the county. With snow and cold temps, we are seeing livestock being fed hay earlier than anticipated. There is still corn remaining in the field with high moisture and now there are snow drifts to contend with.

NORTHEAST: Some concern about corn in storage on the ground. Tops of piles are heating up and turning black.

NORTHEAST: Snow and blowing snow have been a problem for livestock care. Most, if not all, of the normal crop feeding residue is covered under snow. Some small calves were lost during the early January storm with temperatures dropping down to 27 below zero.

CENTRAL: Cold weather and snow have forced cattle producers to feed cattle in the stalks more forage and has reduced supply. General cow condition has declined over the past month. Warmer, drier weather has allowed some more of the corn to be harvested.

EAST CENTRAL: The continued cold temps have taken a toll on all livestock. Weight gains are down and overall condition of cows about to calve are not great. A couple of producers have reported the calves are weaker when born with not much stamina.

SOUTHWEST: Calving has started. We still have a few corn fields that haven’t been harvested yet but there has been progress.

SOUTHEAST: There were concerns early in the month about declining feed supplies; difficulty getting feed to livestock due to snow; additional fuel expense hauling feed to livestock, and clearing snow. Snow melted and livestock are back out gleaning stalks. There were several livestock deaths caused by the storms.

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending January 2010

For the month of January 2010, above normal temperatures during the second and third weeks of the month brought some relief to livestock producers struggling to feed and care for livestock. Precipitation was light during January with much of the western two-thirds of the state receiving less than .25 inch. Snow depth was also limited in the western two thirds of the State, however, a foot or more was still being reported in portions of the northeast. Livestock care and marketing grain were the main activities during the month.

Average snow depth at the end of January was 3 inches statewide, less than half of the eight inches reported at the beginning of the month. However, snow depth varied widely by region. Temperatures averaged below normal the first and fourth weeks of the month and above normal during the middle. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 26 degrees in the extreme northwest to 32 degrees in parts of the southeast and east central counties.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 0 percent very poor, 6 poor, 39 fair, 51 good, and 4 excellent, below last year. Hay and forage supplies rated 1 percent very short, 13 short, 83 adequate, and 3 excellent, were also below a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 3 poor, 28 fair, 66 good, and 3 excellent, below last year.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and Co. Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Snow fall ranged from 30 inches to only 5 inches throughout the county. With snow and cold temps, we are seeing livestock being fed hay earlier than anticipated. There is still corn remaining in the field with high moisture and now there are snow drifts to contend with.

NORTHEAST: Some concern about corn in storage on the ground. Tops of piles are heating up and turning black.

NORTHEAST: Snow and blowing snow have been a problem for livestock care. Most, if not all, of the normal crop feeding residue is covered under snow. Some small calves were lost during the early January storm with temperatures dropping down to 27 below zero.

CENTRAL: Cold weather and snow have forced cattle producers to feed cattle in the stalks more forage and has reduced supply. General cow condition has declined over the past month. Warmer, drier weather has allowed some more of the corn to be harvested.

EAST CENTRAL: The continued cold temps have taken a toll on all livestock. Weight gains are down and overall condition of cows about to calve are not great. A couple of producers have reported the calves are weaker when born with not much stamina.

SOUTHWEST: Calving has started. We still have a few corn fields that haven’t been harvested yet but there has been progress.

SOUTHEAST: There were concerns early in the month about declining feed supplies; difficulty getting feed to livestock due to snow; additional fuel expense hauling feed to livestock, and clearing snow. Snow melted and livestock are back out gleaning stalks. There were several livestock deaths caused by the storms.

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending January 2010

For the month of January 2010, above normal temperatures during the second and third weeks of the month brought some relief to livestock producers struggling to feed and care for livestock. Precipitation was light during January with much of the western two-thirds of the state receiving less than .25 inch. Snow depth was also limited in the western two thirds of the State, however, a foot or more was still being reported in portions of the northeast. Livestock care and marketing grain were the main activities during the month.

Average snow depth at the end of January was 3 inches statewide, less than half of the eight inches reported at the beginning of the month. However, snow depth varied widely by region. Temperatures averaged below normal the first and fourth weeks of the month and above normal during the middle. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 26 degrees in the extreme northwest to 32 degrees in parts of the southeast and east central counties.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 0 percent very poor, 6 poor, 39 fair, 51 good, and 4 excellent, below last year. Hay and forage supplies rated 1 percent very short, 13 short, 83 adequate, and 3 excellent, were also below a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 3 poor, 28 fair, 66 good, and 3 excellent, below last year.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and Co. Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Snow fall ranged from 30 inches to only 5 inches throughout the county. With snow and cold temps, we are seeing livestock being fed hay earlier than anticipated. There is still corn remaining in the field with high moisture and now there are snow drifts to contend with.

NORTHEAST: Some concern about corn in storage on the ground. Tops of piles are heating up and turning black.

NORTHEAST: Snow and blowing snow have been a problem for livestock care. Most, if not all, of the normal crop feeding residue is covered under snow. Some small calves were lost during the early January storm with temperatures dropping down to 27 below zero.

CENTRAL: Cold weather and snow have forced cattle producers to feed cattle in the stalks more forage and has reduced supply. General cow condition has declined over the past month. Warmer, drier weather has allowed some more of the corn to be harvested.

EAST CENTRAL: The continued cold temps have taken a toll on all livestock. Weight gains are down and overall condition of cows about to calve are not great. A couple of producers have reported the calves are weaker when born with not much stamina.

SOUTHWEST: Calving has started. We still have a few corn fields that haven’t been harvested yet but there has been progress.

SOUTHEAST: There were concerns early in the month about declining feed supplies; difficulty getting feed to livestock due to snow; additional fuel expense hauling feed to livestock, and clearing snow. Snow melted and livestock are back out gleaning stalks. There were several livestock deaths caused by the storms.