Plains Edition USDA Information for 3-6-10 | TheFencePost.com

Plains Edition USDA Information for 3-6-10

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending February 2010

Below average temperatures during the last 3 weeks of the month and snow cover made for harsh conditions for livestock according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Snow covered fields made grazing of stalks difficult and more hay is being fed. Calving is under way and progressing. Precipitation during February averaged less than an inch of moisture across much of the state.

Average snow depth at the end of February was 4 inches statewide, near the same as reported at the beginning of the month. However, snow depth varied widely by region with the northeast reporting over a foot on the ground. Temperatures averaged near normal the first week of the month but 7-10 degrees below normal the remainder of February. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 28 degrees in the west to 32 degrees in parts of the east.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 0 percent very poor, 8 poor, 43 fair, 45 good, and 4 excellent, below last year. Hay and forage supplies rated 1 percent very short, 16 short, 78 adequate, and 5 surplus, also below a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 4 poor, 27 fair, 67 good, and 2 excellent, below last year. Calving progressed to 23 percent complete.

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The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and Co. Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Concern for wheat centers around damage from wind erosion and severely cold weather through January. There has been snow cover the past month protecting the wheat. The snows that have fallen in that period pose little problem at this time but the melting is running off the frozen soil and producing ponding in low areas. We may see wheat within a field damaged from wind erosion and cold and next to it wheat damaged from extended periods of snow and/or water/ice cover. We may be heading into a challenging spring.

NORTHEAST: Some concern about corn in storage on the ground. Tops of piles are heating up and turning black.

CENTRAL: Ground beginning to thaw has caused very muddy conditions for calving. A lot of moisture in ground from fall snow should be an advantage for spring crops.

EAST CENTRAL: Cold weather has been hard on livestock. Some new born calf loss has been reported. With all the snow cover, supplemental feeding has been required and a lot of hay supply is being used. Some farm meetings have occurred and ordering seed and fertilizer are the main activities.

SOUTHWEST: The snow has melted in the range parts of the county. Calving seems to be going good at this time.

SOUTHEAST: Cattle conditions improved after the temperatures warmed up from the bitter cold of January and the snow cover melted so that the cows were able to utilize the stalks. At this time, the farmers are beginning to talk about how the hay is getting short but I have not heard of anyone buying hay yet. However, I have seen some movement of hay. For the time being I would say supplies are good unless another major storm hits.

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending February 2010

Below average temperatures during the last 3 weeks of the month and snow cover made for harsh conditions for livestock according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Snow covered fields made grazing of stalks difficult and more hay is being fed. Calving is under way and progressing. Precipitation during February averaged less than an inch of moisture across much of the state.

Average snow depth at the end of February was 4 inches statewide, near the same as reported at the beginning of the month. However, snow depth varied widely by region with the northeast reporting over a foot on the ground. Temperatures averaged near normal the first week of the month but 7-10 degrees below normal the remainder of February. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 28 degrees in the west to 32 degrees in parts of the east.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 0 percent very poor, 8 poor, 43 fair, 45 good, and 4 excellent, below last year. Hay and forage supplies rated 1 percent very short, 16 short, 78 adequate, and 5 surplus, also below a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 4 poor, 27 fair, 67 good, and 2 excellent, below last year. Calving progressed to 23 percent complete.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and Co. Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Concern for wheat centers around damage from wind erosion and severely cold weather through January. There has been snow cover the past month protecting the wheat. The snows that have fallen in that period pose little problem at this time but the melting is running off the frozen soil and producing ponding in low areas. We may see wheat within a field damaged from wind erosion and cold and next to it wheat damaged from extended periods of snow and/or water/ice cover. We may be heading into a challenging spring.

NORTHEAST: Some concern about corn in storage on the ground. Tops of piles are heating up and turning black.

CENTRAL: Ground beginning to thaw has caused very muddy conditions for calving. A lot of moisture in ground from fall snow should be an advantage for spring crops.

EAST CENTRAL: Cold weather has been hard on livestock. Some new born calf loss has been reported. With all the snow cover, supplemental feeding has been required and a lot of hay supply is being used. Some farm meetings have occurred and ordering seed and fertilizer are the main activities.

SOUTHWEST: The snow has melted in the range parts of the county. Calving seems to be going good at this time.

SOUTHEAST: Cattle conditions improved after the temperatures warmed up from the bitter cold of January and the snow cover melted so that the cows were able to utilize the stalks. At this time, the farmers are beginning to talk about how the hay is getting short but I have not heard of anyone buying hay yet. However, I have seen some movement of hay. For the time being I would say supplies are good unless another major storm hits.

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending February 2010

Below average temperatures during the last 3 weeks of the month and snow cover made for harsh conditions for livestock according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Snow covered fields made grazing of stalks difficult and more hay is being fed. Calving is under way and progressing. Precipitation during February averaged less than an inch of moisture across much of the state.

Average snow depth at the end of February was 4 inches statewide, near the same as reported at the beginning of the month. However, snow depth varied widely by region with the northeast reporting over a foot on the ground. Temperatures averaged near normal the first week of the month but 7-10 degrees below normal the remainder of February. During the last week of the month, soil temperatures ranged from 28 degrees in the west to 32 degrees in parts of the east.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions statewide rated 0 percent very poor, 8 poor, 43 fair, 45 good, and 4 excellent, below last year. Hay and forage supplies rated 1 percent very short, 16 short, 78 adequate, and 5 surplus, also below a year ago.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves condition rated 0 percent very poor, 4 poor, 27 fair, 67 good, and 2 excellent, below last year. Calving progressed to 23 percent complete.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and Co. Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Concern for wheat centers around damage from wind erosion and severely cold weather through January. There has been snow cover the past month protecting the wheat. The snows that have fallen in that period pose little problem at this time but the melting is running off the frozen soil and producing ponding in low areas. We may see wheat within a field damaged from wind erosion and cold and next to it wheat damaged from extended periods of snow and/or water/ice cover. We may be heading into a challenging spring.

NORTHEAST: Some concern about corn in storage on the ground. Tops of piles are heating up and turning black.

CENTRAL: Ground beginning to thaw has caused very muddy conditions for calving. A lot of moisture in ground from fall snow should be an advantage for spring crops.

EAST CENTRAL: Cold weather has been hard on livestock. Some new born calf loss has been reported. With all the snow cover, supplemental feeding has been required and a lot of hay supply is being used. Some farm meetings have occurred and ordering seed and fertilizer are the main activities.

SOUTHWEST: The snow has melted in the range parts of the county. Calving seems to be going good at this time.

SOUTHEAST: Cattle conditions improved after the temperatures warmed up from the bitter cold of January and the snow cover melted so that the cows were able to utilize the stalks. At this time, the farmers are beginning to talk about how the hay is getting short but I have not heard of anyone buying hay yet. However, I have seen some movement of hay. For the time being I would say supplies are good unless another major storm hits.