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Plains Edition USDA Information for 4-3-10

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending March 2010

For the month of March 2010, temperatures averaged above normal except for the third week of the month, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Precipitation during March was above normal with most areas receiving one to two inches of moisture except for the Panhandle which was below normal. Soil temperatures at the end of the month were above freezing across the state. Cold and wet conditions have caused higher than normal calf losses for some producers. Cattle have been removed from muddy lots to drier areas where possible. Fieldwork has been limited because of the wet conditions. Some anhydrous applications and hauling of grain have taken place.

At the end of March nearly all snow had melted and was limited to a few areas in the Northeast District. Precipitation for the month was above normal, with the last week receiving the most precipitation. Temperatures averaged above normal for the month, with the first, second, and fourth weeks above normal and the third week below normal.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 8 poor, 35 fair, 51 good, and 6 excellent, below last year’s condition of 68 percent good or excellent.

Hay and forage supplies rated 2 percent very short, 20 short, 74 adequate, and 4 surplus, well below year ago levels of 95 percent adequate or surplus.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 6 poor, 29 fair, 62 good, and 2 excellent, below year ago levels. Calving progressed to 57 percent complete, near year a ago, with calf losses mostly average across the state.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and Co. Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Wheat is greening up even in concerned areas. The wind erosion that occurred through January was limited due to snow cover. The year appears to be average at this point. No sugar beets planted yet this year.

NORTHEAST: With the snow melt and cool, wet weather over the past three weeks, calving conditions have been poor to very poor for producers. Producers have been busy moving farm-stored grain to avoid losses due to spoilage.

CENTRAL: Fields are still extremely wet. Some limited stalk shredding and limited NH3 applications. Some cattle have been moved to grass just to get them out of the mud. Farmers are anxious to get into the fields.

EAST CENTRAL: Some corn is still being harvested and taken to town while some are taking a few loads out of the bins because of condition of grain. Producers are getting planters and other spring tillage equipment ready for the field.

SOUTHWEST: Fieldwork is beginning in dryer areas. Not many reports of calf losses this spring. Wheat that was able to be planted last fall is reported to be average.

SOUTHEAST: Delayed fieldwork becoming a concern. Increased calving losses reported due to mud in calving areas.

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending March 2010

For the month of March 2010, temperatures averaged above normal except for the third week of the month, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Precipitation during March was above normal with most areas receiving one to two inches of moisture except for the Panhandle which was below normal. Soil temperatures at the end of the month were above freezing across the state. Cold and wet conditions have caused higher than normal calf losses for some producers. Cattle have been removed from muddy lots to drier areas where possible. Fieldwork has been limited because of the wet conditions. Some anhydrous applications and hauling of grain have taken place.

At the end of March nearly all snow had melted and was limited to a few areas in the Northeast District. Precipitation for the month was above normal, with the last week receiving the most precipitation. Temperatures averaged above normal for the month, with the first, second, and fourth weeks above normal and the third week below normal.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 8 poor, 35 fair, 51 good, and 6 excellent, below last year’s condition of 68 percent good or excellent.

Hay and forage supplies rated 2 percent very short, 20 short, 74 adequate, and 4 surplus, well below year ago levels of 95 percent adequate or surplus.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 6 poor, 29 fair, 62 good, and 2 excellent, below year ago levels. Calving progressed to 57 percent complete, near year a ago, with calf losses mostly average across the state.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and Co. Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Wheat is greening up even in concerned areas. The wind erosion that occurred through January was limited due to snow cover. The year appears to be average at this point. No sugar beets planted yet this year.

NORTHEAST: With the snow melt and cool, wet weather over the past three weeks, calving conditions have been poor to very poor for producers. Producers have been busy moving farm-stored grain to avoid losses due to spoilage.

CENTRAL: Fields are still extremely wet. Some limited stalk shredding and limited NH3 applications. Some cattle have been moved to grass just to get them out of the mud. Farmers are anxious to get into the fields.

EAST CENTRAL: Some corn is still being harvested and taken to town while some are taking a few loads out of the bins because of condition of grain. Producers are getting planters and other spring tillage equipment ready for the field.

SOUTHWEST: Fieldwork is beginning in dryer areas. Not many reports of calf losses this spring. Wheat that was able to be planted last fall is reported to be average.

SOUTHEAST: Delayed fieldwork becoming a concern. Increased calving losses reported due to mud in calving areas.

NEBRASKA CROPS/WEATHER SUMMARY

Month Ending March 2010

For the month of March 2010, temperatures averaged above normal except for the third week of the month, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Precipitation during March was above normal with most areas receiving one to two inches of moisture except for the Panhandle which was below normal. Soil temperatures at the end of the month were above freezing across the state. Cold and wet conditions have caused higher than normal calf losses for some producers. Cattle have been removed from muddy lots to drier areas where possible. Fieldwork has been limited because of the wet conditions. Some anhydrous applications and hauling of grain have taken place.

At the end of March nearly all snow had melted and was limited to a few areas in the Northeast District. Precipitation for the month was above normal, with the last week receiving the most precipitation. Temperatures averaged above normal for the month, with the first, second, and fourth weeks above normal and the third week below normal.

Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 8 poor, 35 fair, 51 good, and 6 excellent, below last year’s condition of 68 percent good or excellent.

Hay and forage supplies rated 2 percent very short, 20 short, 74 adequate, and 4 surplus, well below year ago levels of 95 percent adequate or surplus.

Livestock, Pasture, and Range Report: Cattle and Calves conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 6 poor, 29 fair, 62 good, and 2 excellent, below year ago levels. Calving progressed to 57 percent complete, near year a ago, with calf losses mostly average across the state.

The following are comments from Nebraska’s FSA County Executive Directors and Co. Extension Educators:

NORTHWEST: Wheat is greening up even in concerned areas. The wind erosion that occurred through January was limited due to snow cover. The year appears to be average at this point. No sugar beets planted yet this year.

NORTHEAST: With the snow melt and cool, wet weather over the past three weeks, calving conditions have been poor to very poor for producers. Producers have been busy moving farm-stored grain to avoid losses due to spoilage.

CENTRAL: Fields are still extremely wet. Some limited stalk shredding and limited NH3 applications. Some cattle have been moved to grass just to get them out of the mud. Farmers are anxious to get into the fields.

EAST CENTRAL: Some corn is still being harvested and taken to town while some are taking a few loads out of the bins because of condition of grain. Producers are getting planters and other spring tillage equipment ready for the field.

SOUTHWEST: Fieldwork is beginning in dryer areas. Not many reports of calf losses this spring. Wheat that was able to be planted last fall is reported to be average.

SOUTHEAST: Delayed fieldwork becoming a concern. Increased calving losses reported due to mud in calving areas.


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