Quackgrass Sally: On the Trail 11-7-11 | TheFencePost.com

Quackgrass Sally: On the Trail 11-7-11

Quackgrass Sally
Ranch Wife & Trail Gal

I have found an almost magical place, off the beaten path, where time, space and perspective take new direction. Just outside Spearfish, S.D., tucked among the tall trees and thick foliage sits a fascinating house, almost as unique as the family that lives in it.

When I arrived at 1920 Christensen Drive, I was welcomed by Dick Termes, a smiling, white-haired, whiskered gentleman, coming down the walkway of a multi-leveled Geo-dome house. I expressed my surprise at seeing this type of structure and he smiled, with a childish twinkle in his eye and said, “Yes, it is a bit out of the ordinary for the Black Hills but it’s home to us.”

Seems that years ago, Dick had met Buckminster Fuller, the inventor of the geodesic dome and was fascinated with the idea. So, needing a place to display his art, Dick built the main dome structure, then added another addition and then another, into the workshop-gallery-family home I saw that day.

But the true wonder of the place was revealed when I stepped through the Termesphere gallery’s front door. Like a portal to an unbelievable new universe, I entered a room filled with spheres. They were everywhere I looked. Like unknown new planets floating in space, suspended from the high dome ceiling were rainbows of colors and patterns, amazing shapes and designs in a varied assortment of sizes. This is Dick Termes’ artwork. It truly took my breath away and I couldn’t say a word until I heard a quiet chuckle from behind me and Dick said, “Welcome to my world of the Six Point Perspective.”

Dick Termes is an artist whose artwork has been recognized all over the United States, Europe, and even Japan. With over 300 major pieces on display, he is unlike any other painter, for his painting canvases are spheres. Each one a completely unique round world, where when you gaze at it, you will see north, south, east, west, up and down. Some of the paintings are realistic, some geometric or surrealistic, and some are a mixture of all three.

“It’s as if you put a transparent sphere on your head and paint what you see,” says Termes. “Sometimes I’m inside the ball looking out so that when I’m finished, the viewer has to decide if he is gazing into the sphere or looking out from within it … or maybe even through it to beyond.”

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When I asked what Six Point Perspective was, Dick explained how he paints. “I pick a point on a ball and then decide where I want the ‘rotating point,’ or center of the sphere, to be. This determines the perspective one has if the person is standing inside the sphere. The six points are then directly above, below, in front, behind, and to each side, equally spaced. I wanted to expand the perspective in order to capture more and more of the visual world. With Six Point Perspective, drawings and paintings reveal a TOTAL view encompassing the full 360 degrees in all directions. You start with geometry and work to design realism.”

Dick Termes taught middle and high school for several years in Oregon, mostly art classes but also biology and mechanical drawing. He moved to Sheridan, Wyo., and continued teaching but after two years, resigned and ended up attending the University of Wyoming, getting his master’s degree in art in 1969. He then attended Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles for a master’s in fine arts degree. But South Dakota was home, where his family still lived, so he returned again to the Black Hills. At a South Dakota Arts Council convention in Pierre, Dick met Markie Scholz, a master puppeteer and one of the founders of Dragons are Too Seldom Puppet Productions. The two artists married and have raised two sons who are following in their parents footsteps, one a musician and the other a photojournalist. Markie is still an active puppeteer and happily introduced me to several of her “character” puppets, including a dragon and blue-footed loony bird. Working alongside Dick, she stays busy writing scripts and making “Baby Einstein” videos for children.

Dick lead me out back of the gallery where we wandered around his odd shaped home, shingled almost to the ground in cedar shingles. Climbing up wooden steps I entered into his workshop, another large round, high-ceiling room. Here shelves overflowed with drawings, photos, and zillions of assorted odd boxes. Huge sacks filled with white and clear globes of all sizes hung suspended from hooks. A wood stove peeked out from beside a cluttered desk, above which a drawing of Einstein hung. Dick said this is where he creates and paints, pointing to a small work table splattered in a rainbow of dried paint drops. Brushes of all sizes and shapes, stacked inside mason jars surrounded the tabletop. I felt like I had almost stepped inside one of Dick’s spheres … the workshop filled up my eye 360 degrees.

Before saying goodbye to Markie and Dick, I had to take one last look at the gallery. I walked around the sphere filled room, surrounded by artwork that played with my eyes and mind. Gazing at the paintings on the globes, I could see both into and around each scene … as if the image changed from concave to convex before my eyes, depending on how I “let” my mind view it. Here was Notre Dame Cathedral on a sphere … wondrous in even the tiniest of detail. Each piece is unbelievable, painted by a masterful painter whose imagination and multifaceted technique are beyond compare. If you can, take time to discover this true art wonderland and step through the portal into the round universe of Termespheres.

I have found an almost magical place, off the beaten path, where time, space and perspective take new direction. Just outside Spearfish, S.D., tucked among the tall trees and thick foliage sits a fascinating house, almost as unique as the family that lives in it.

When I arrived at 1920 Christensen Drive, I was welcomed by Dick Termes, a smiling, white-haired, whiskered gentleman, coming down the walkway of a multi-leveled Geo-dome house. I expressed my surprise at seeing this type of structure and he smiled, with a childish twinkle in his eye and said, “Yes, it is a bit out of the ordinary for the Black Hills but it’s home to us.”

Seems that years ago, Dick had met Buckminster Fuller, the inventor of the geodesic dome and was fascinated with the idea. So, needing a place to display his art, Dick built the main dome structure, then added another addition and then another, into the workshop-gallery-family home I saw that day.

But the true wonder of the place was revealed when I stepped through the Termesphere gallery’s front door. Like a portal to an unbelievable new universe, I entered a room filled with spheres. They were everywhere I looked. Like unknown new planets floating in space, suspended from the high dome ceiling were rainbows of colors and patterns, amazing shapes and designs in a varied assortment of sizes. This is Dick Termes’ artwork. It truly took my breath away and I couldn’t say a word until I heard a quiet chuckle from behind me and Dick said, “Welcome to my world of the Six Point Perspective.”

Dick Termes is an artist whose artwork has been recognized all over the United States, Europe, and even Japan. With over 300 major pieces on display, he is unlike any other painter, for his painting canvases are spheres. Each one a completely unique round world, where when you gaze at it, you will see north, south, east, west, up and down. Some of the paintings are realistic, some geometric or surrealistic, and some are a mixture of all three.

“It’s as if you put a transparent sphere on your head and paint what you see,” says Termes. “Sometimes I’m inside the ball looking out so that when I’m finished, the viewer has to decide if he is gazing into the sphere or looking out from within it … or maybe even through it to beyond.”

When I asked what Six Point Perspective was, Dick explained how he paints. “I pick a point on a ball and then decide where I want the ‘rotating point,’ or center of the sphere, to be. This determines the perspective one has if the person is standing inside the sphere. The six points are then directly above, below, in front, behind, and to each side, equally spaced. I wanted to expand the perspective in order to capture more and more of the visual world. With Six Point Perspective, drawings and paintings reveal a TOTAL view encompassing the full 360 degrees in all directions. You start with geometry and work to design realism.”

Dick Termes taught middle and high school for several years in Oregon, mostly art classes but also biology and mechanical drawing. He moved to Sheridan, Wyo., and continued teaching but after two years, resigned and ended up attending the University of Wyoming, getting his master’s degree in art in 1969. He then attended Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles for a master’s in fine arts degree. But South Dakota was home, where his family still lived, so he returned again to the Black Hills. At a South Dakota Arts Council convention in Pierre, Dick met Markie Scholz, a master puppeteer and one of the founders of Dragons are Too Seldom Puppet Productions. The two artists married and have raised two sons who are following in their parents footsteps, one a musician and the other a photojournalist. Markie is still an active puppeteer and happily introduced me to several of her “character” puppets, including a dragon and blue-footed loony bird. Working alongside Dick, she stays busy writing scripts and making “Baby Einstein” videos for children.

Dick lead me out back of the gallery where we wandered around his odd shaped home, shingled almost to the ground in cedar shingles. Climbing up wooden steps I entered into his workshop, another large round, high-ceiling room. Here shelves overflowed with drawings, photos, and zillions of assorted odd boxes. Huge sacks filled with white and clear globes of all sizes hung suspended from hooks. A wood stove peeked out from beside a cluttered desk, above which a drawing of Einstein hung. Dick said this is where he creates and paints, pointing to a small work table splattered in a rainbow of dried paint drops. Brushes of all sizes and shapes, stacked inside mason jars surrounded the tabletop. I felt like I had almost stepped inside one of Dick’s spheres … the workshop filled up my eye 360 degrees.

Before saying goodbye to Markie and Dick, I had to take one last look at the gallery. I walked around the sphere filled room, surrounded by artwork that played with my eyes and mind. Gazing at the paintings on the globes, I could see both into and around each scene … as if the image changed from concave to convex before my eyes, depending on how I “let” my mind view it. Here was Notre Dame Cathedral on a sphere … wondrous in even the tiniest of detail. Each piece is unbelievable, painted by a masterful painter whose imagination and multifaceted technique are beyond compare. If you can, take time to discover this true art wonderland and step through the portal into the round universe of Termespheres.

I have found an almost magical place, off the beaten path, where time, space and perspective take new direction. Just outside Spearfish, S.D., tucked among the tall trees and thick foliage sits a fascinating house, almost as unique as the family that lives in it.

When I arrived at 1920 Christensen Drive, I was welcomed by Dick Termes, a smiling, white-haired, whiskered gentleman, coming down the walkway of a multi-leveled Geo-dome house. I expressed my surprise at seeing this type of structure and he smiled, with a childish twinkle in his eye and said, “Yes, it is a bit out of the ordinary for the Black Hills but it’s home to us.”

Seems that years ago, Dick had met Buckminster Fuller, the inventor of the geodesic dome and was fascinated with the idea. So, needing a place to display his art, Dick built the main dome structure, then added another addition and then another, into the workshop-gallery-family home I saw that day.

But the true wonder of the place was revealed when I stepped through the Termesphere gallery’s front door. Like a portal to an unbelievable new universe, I entered a room filled with spheres. They were everywhere I looked. Like unknown new planets floating in space, suspended from the high dome ceiling were rainbows of colors and patterns, amazing shapes and designs in a varied assortment of sizes. This is Dick Termes’ artwork. It truly took my breath away and I couldn’t say a word until I heard a quiet chuckle from behind me and Dick said, “Welcome to my world of the Six Point Perspective.”

Dick Termes is an artist whose artwork has been recognized all over the United States, Europe, and even Japan. With over 300 major pieces on display, he is unlike any other painter, for his painting canvases are spheres. Each one a completely unique round world, where when you gaze at it, you will see north, south, east, west, up and down. Some of the paintings are realistic, some geometric or surrealistic, and some are a mixture of all three.

“It’s as if you put a transparent sphere on your head and paint what you see,” says Termes. “Sometimes I’m inside the ball looking out so that when I’m finished, the viewer has to decide if he is gazing into the sphere or looking out from within it … or maybe even through it to beyond.”

When I asked what Six Point Perspective was, Dick explained how he paints. “I pick a point on a ball and then decide where I want the ‘rotating point,’ or center of the sphere, to be. This determines the perspective one has if the person is standing inside the sphere. The six points are then directly above, below, in front, behind, and to each side, equally spaced. I wanted to expand the perspective in order to capture more and more of the visual world. With Six Point Perspective, drawings and paintings reveal a TOTAL view encompassing the full 360 degrees in all directions. You start with geometry and work to design realism.”

Dick Termes taught middle and high school for several years in Oregon, mostly art classes but also biology and mechanical drawing. He moved to Sheridan, Wyo., and continued teaching but after two years, resigned and ended up attending the University of Wyoming, getting his master’s degree in art in 1969. He then attended Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles for a master’s in fine arts degree. But South Dakota was home, where his family still lived, so he returned again to the Black Hills. At a South Dakota Arts Council convention in Pierre, Dick met Markie Scholz, a master puppeteer and one of the founders of Dragons are Too Seldom Puppet Productions. The two artists married and have raised two sons who are following in their parents footsteps, one a musician and the other a photojournalist. Markie is still an active puppeteer and happily introduced me to several of her “character” puppets, including a dragon and blue-footed loony bird. Working alongside Dick, she stays busy writing scripts and making “Baby Einstein” videos for children.

Dick lead me out back of the gallery where we wandered around his odd shaped home, shingled almost to the ground in cedar shingles. Climbing up wooden steps I entered into his workshop, another large round, high-ceiling room. Here shelves overflowed with drawings, photos, and zillions of assorted odd boxes. Huge sacks filled with white and clear globes of all sizes hung suspended from hooks. A wood stove peeked out from beside a cluttered desk, above which a drawing of Einstein hung. Dick said this is where he creates and paints, pointing to a small work table splattered in a rainbow of dried paint drops. Brushes of all sizes and shapes, stacked inside mason jars surrounded the tabletop. I felt like I had almost stepped inside one of Dick’s spheres … the workshop filled up my eye 360 degrees.

Before saying goodbye to Markie and Dick, I had to take one last look at the gallery. I walked around the sphere filled room, surrounded by artwork that played with my eyes and mind. Gazing at the paintings on the globes, I could see both into and around each scene … as if the image changed from concave to convex before my eyes, depending on how I “let” my mind view it. Here was Notre Dame Cathedral on a sphere … wondrous in even the tiniest of detail. Each piece is unbelievable, painted by a masterful painter whose imagination and multifaceted technique are beyond compare. If you can, take time to discover this true art wonderland and step through the portal into the round universe of Termespheres.

I have found an almost magical place, off the beaten path, where time, space and perspective take new direction. Just outside Spearfish, S.D., tucked among the tall trees and thick foliage sits a fascinating house, almost as unique as the family that lives in it.

When I arrived at 1920 Christensen Drive, I was welcomed by Dick Termes, a smiling, white-haired, whiskered gentleman, coming down the walkway of a multi-leveled Geo-dome house. I expressed my surprise at seeing this type of structure and he smiled, with a childish twinkle in his eye and said, “Yes, it is a bit out of the ordinary for the Black Hills but it’s home to us.”

Seems that years ago, Dick had met Buckminster Fuller, the inventor of the geodesic dome and was fascinated with the idea. So, needing a place to display his art, Dick built the main dome structure, then added another addition and then another, into the workshop-gallery-family home I saw that day.

But the true wonder of the place was revealed when I stepped through the Termesphere gallery’s front door. Like a portal to an unbelievable new universe, I entered a room filled with spheres. They were everywhere I looked. Like unknown new planets floating in space, suspended from the high dome ceiling were rainbows of colors and patterns, amazing shapes and designs in a varied assortment of sizes. This is Dick Termes’ artwork. It truly took my breath away and I couldn’t say a word until I heard a quiet chuckle from behind me and Dick said, “Welcome to my world of the Six Point Perspective.”

Dick Termes is an artist whose artwork has been recognized all over the United States, Europe, and even Japan. With over 300 major pieces on display, he is unlike any other painter, for his painting canvases are spheres. Each one a completely unique round world, where when you gaze at it, you will see north, south, east, west, up and down. Some of the paintings are realistic, some geometric or surrealistic, and some are a mixture of all three.

“It’s as if you put a transparent sphere on your head and paint what you see,” says Termes. “Sometimes I’m inside the ball looking out so that when I’m finished, the viewer has to decide if he is gazing into the sphere or looking out from within it … or maybe even through it to beyond.”

When I asked what Six Point Perspective was, Dick explained how he paints. “I pick a point on a ball and then decide where I want the ‘rotating point,’ or center of the sphere, to be. This determines the perspective one has if the person is standing inside the sphere. The six points are then directly above, below, in front, behind, and to each side, equally spaced. I wanted to expand the perspective in order to capture more and more of the visual world. With Six Point Perspective, drawings and paintings reveal a TOTAL view encompassing the full 360 degrees in all directions. You start with geometry and work to design realism.”

Dick Termes taught middle and high school for several years in Oregon, mostly art classes but also biology and mechanical drawing. He moved to Sheridan, Wyo., and continued teaching but after two years, resigned and ended up attending the University of Wyoming, getting his master’s degree in art in 1969. He then attended Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles for a master’s in fine arts degree. But South Dakota was home, where his family still lived, so he returned again to the Black Hills. At a South Dakota Arts Council convention in Pierre, Dick met Markie Scholz, a master puppeteer and one of the founders of Dragons are Too Seldom Puppet Productions. The two artists married and have raised two sons who are following in their parents footsteps, one a musician and the other a photojournalist. Markie is still an active puppeteer and happily introduced me to several of her “character” puppets, including a dragon and blue-footed loony bird. Working alongside Dick, she stays busy writing scripts and making “Baby Einstein” videos for children.

Dick lead me out back of the gallery where we wandered around his odd shaped home, shingled almost to the ground in cedar shingles. Climbing up wooden steps I entered into his workshop, another large round, high-ceiling room. Here shelves overflowed with drawings, photos, and zillions of assorted odd boxes. Huge sacks filled with white and clear globes of all sizes hung suspended from hooks. A wood stove peeked out from beside a cluttered desk, above which a drawing of Einstein hung. Dick said this is where he creates and paints, pointing to a small work table splattered in a rainbow of dried paint drops. Brushes of all sizes and shapes, stacked inside mason jars surrounded the tabletop. I felt like I had almost stepped inside one of Dick’s spheres … the workshop filled up my eye 360 degrees.

Before saying goodbye to Markie and Dick, I had to take one last look at the gallery. I walked around the sphere filled room, surrounded by artwork that played with my eyes and mind. Gazing at the paintings on the globes, I could see both into and around each scene … as if the image changed from concave to convex before my eyes, depending on how I “let” my mind view it. Here was Notre Dame Cathedral on a sphere … wondrous in even the tiniest of detail. Each piece is unbelievable, painted by a masterful painter whose imagination and multifaceted technique are beyond compare. If you can, take time to discover this true art wonderland and step through the portal into the round universe of Termespheres.

I have found an almost magical place, off the beaten path, where time, space and perspective take new direction. Just outside Spearfish, S.D., tucked among the tall trees and thick foliage sits a fascinating house, almost as unique as the family that lives in it.

When I arrived at 1920 Christensen Drive, I was welcomed by Dick Termes, a smiling, white-haired, whiskered gentleman, coming down the walkway of a multi-leveled Geo-dome house. I expressed my surprise at seeing this type of structure and he smiled, with a childish twinkle in his eye and said, “Yes, it is a bit out of the ordinary for the Black Hills but it’s home to us.”

Seems that years ago, Dick had met Buckminster Fuller, the inventor of the geodesic dome and was fascinated with the idea. So, needing a place to display his art, Dick built the main dome structure, then added another addition and then another, into the workshop-gallery-family home I saw that day.

But the true wonder of the place was revealed when I stepped through the Termesphere gallery’s front door. Like a portal to an unbelievable new universe, I entered a room filled with spheres. They were everywhere I looked. Like unknown new planets floating in space, suspended from the high dome ceiling were rainbows of colors and patterns, amazing shapes and designs in a varied assortment of sizes. This is Dick Termes’ artwork. It truly took my breath away and I couldn’t say a word until I heard a quiet chuckle from behind me and Dick said, “Welcome to my world of the Six Point Perspective.”

Dick Termes is an artist whose artwork has been recognized all over the United States, Europe, and even Japan. With over 300 major pieces on display, he is unlike any other painter, for his painting canvases are spheres. Each one a completely unique round world, where when you gaze at it, you will see north, south, east, west, up and down. Some of the paintings are realistic, some geometric or surrealistic, and some are a mixture of all three.

“It’s as if you put a transparent sphere on your head and paint what you see,” says Termes. “Sometimes I’m inside the ball looking out so that when I’m finished, the viewer has to decide if he is gazing into the sphere or looking out from within it … or maybe even through it to beyond.”

When I asked what Six Point Perspective was, Dick explained how he paints. “I pick a point on a ball and then decide where I want the ‘rotating point,’ or center of the sphere, to be. This determines the perspective one has if the person is standing inside the sphere. The six points are then directly above, below, in front, behind, and to each side, equally spaced. I wanted to expand the perspective in order to capture more and more of the visual world. With Six Point Perspective, drawings and paintings reveal a TOTAL view encompassing the full 360 degrees in all directions. You start with geometry and work to design realism.”

Dick Termes taught middle and high school for several years in Oregon, mostly art classes but also biology and mechanical drawing. He moved to Sheridan, Wyo., and continued teaching but after two years, resigned and ended up attending the University of Wyoming, getting his master’s degree in art in 1969. He then attended Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles for a master’s in fine arts degree. But South Dakota was home, where his family still lived, so he returned again to the Black Hills. At a South Dakota Arts Council convention in Pierre, Dick met Markie Scholz, a master puppeteer and one of the founders of Dragons are Too Seldom Puppet Productions. The two artists married and have raised two sons who are following in their parents footsteps, one a musician and the other a photojournalist. Markie is still an active puppeteer and happily introduced me to several of her “character” puppets, including a dragon and blue-footed loony bird. Working alongside Dick, she stays busy writing scripts and making “Baby Einstein” videos for children.

Dick lead me out back of the gallery where we wandered around his odd shaped home, shingled almost to the ground in cedar shingles. Climbing up wooden steps I entered into his workshop, another large round, high-ceiling room. Here shelves overflowed with drawings, photos, and zillions of assorted odd boxes. Huge sacks filled with white and clear globes of all sizes hung suspended from hooks. A wood stove peeked out from beside a cluttered desk, above which a drawing of Einstein hung. Dick said this is where he creates and paints, pointing to a small work table splattered in a rainbow of dried paint drops. Brushes of all sizes and shapes, stacked inside mason jars surrounded the tabletop. I felt like I had almost stepped inside one of Dick’s spheres … the workshop filled up my eye 360 degrees.

Before saying goodbye to Markie and Dick, I had to take one last look at the gallery. I walked around the sphere filled room, surrounded by artwork that played with my eyes and mind. Gazing at the paintings on the globes, I could see both into and around each scene … as if the image changed from concave to convex before my eyes, depending on how I “let” my mind view it. Here was Notre Dame Cathedral on a sphere … wondrous in even the tiniest of detail. Each piece is unbelievable, painted by a masterful painter whose imagination and multifaceted technique are beyond compare. If you can, take time to discover this true art wonderland and step through the portal into the round universe of Termespheres.