Raised with care – Colo. Grass fed lamb | TheFencePost.com

Raised with care – Colo. Grass fed lamb

Lincoln Rogers :: Parker, Colo.

Most people in the United States associate sheep with wool, but Colorado has made a mark within the industry for a different reason. Like Idaho potatoes or Wisconsin cheese identifies a premium product in a consumer’s mind, the mile high state is becoming associated with producing some of the best lamb meat in the country, and small outfits like Mindy Bower and Kevin Hall at the Uh Oh Ranch east of Kiowa, Colo., take pride in the amount of care they put into their natural grass-fed lamb.

After starting nearly by accident in the business nine years ago, Bower has developed an ardent belief regarding the quality of naturally raised, grass fed lamb. Pressed by friends to take home a six-week old puppy she didn’t want at the time, Bower relented and introduced the pup to a ranch already brimming with training horses, raising cattle and collecting eggs.

That puppy turned into Wiz, a Border Collie with a gift for working and, before long, a whole new set of ranch responsibilities was born.

Beginning with five Columbia wool/meat sheep ewes to hone Wiz’s skills, Bower soon immersed herself into the “hair sheep” breeds of Katahdin and then Dorper as she and Hall saw a prime opportunity to increase the production of their 640 acres.

“I just wanted to play around with it, like training sheep,” described Bower of her genesis in the lamb industry. “Then I thought, well, since I have these sheep I might as well breed them. How fun would that be?” she remembered with laughter. “I have some good friends on the western slope and they have about 3,000 ewes and they graze them up on top of Vail Pass. That was my first exposure to really good lamb. I thought, I might as well do that, what the heck. So I got a Katahdin ram and bred him (and) I bred those five (Columbia ewes) to the ram and I loved that.”

Asked regarding the learning curve as a lamb producer starting with the first Katahdin sheep in their flock to the current small but attentive 90 head grass-fed flock of Katahdin, Dorper and crossbred sheep, Bower was candid with her experience. She discovered raising grass-fed Katahdin lamb took longer to reach butcher weight than expected, so she introduced the Dorper breed into her flock with positive results.

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“I got the Dorpers and I was really happy,” she said of their maturation to butchering weight in 10 months. “The first year I used the Dorpers, I had no lambing issues (and) they can have three crop (of lambs) in two years.”

On top of rapid maturation and ease of lambing, Bower also found Dorper meat to have excellent flavor.

“I think with the Dorpers, they really are a mild taste,” she described while watching Will, one of her sheep dogs, guide the flock to pasture.

“Whenever we go to somebody’s place for a sheep dog clinic, it seems we are having lamb; so I’ve gotten to taste a lot of lamb. Once I started tasting that Dorper I was like, oh my gosh,” she recalled with enthusiasm.

“It is incredible. It is very mild, not gamey.”

Being a small producer at present, the Uh Oh Ranch’s lamb sales are primarily through word of mouth from loyal clientele.

“I sell a lot to Boulder,” she said of the current customer base. “I deliver it to them. My dad lived in Boulder (and) he had a whole team of caregivers. They like to know where their food is coming from (there), so people bought it and it kind of started to snowball.”

As a part of raising lamb and selling it to consumers whose criteria includes knowing where it came from and how it was raised, Bower also made a point to be satisfied with the facility where the lamb is processed.

“I take them to Innovative Foods up in Evans,” she said. “Family owned, USDA; they do everything (and) they do a beautiful job. Their pens have sand on the floors and fresh water. Other people don’t care if (the animals) get a drink before they get slaughtered, (but) they take a lot of pride in how they do it. I’ve never had an animal stressed (there). It’s very small, but they do a lot of stuff for Whole Foods and CSU.”

Knowing how the lamb is raised and processed is one matter; convincing a beef and poultry eating public to give it a serious try is another. In order to help overcome the initial challenge, Bower relayed information on the pro side of the lamb equation.

“It has the highest CLA (Conjugated Linoleic Acid) content,” she explained of its health benefits versus other meat as well as grain-fed meat.

“(CLA) is a good fat, so it helps fight cancer and it helps your heart. And grass fed lamb also has a higher Omega 3 content.” She continued to list more reasons.

“Lamb is so simple to raise and it’s not here for a long time,” she said regarding her product’s fresh taste and tenderness. “It takes about two years to finish a grass fed steer. It only takes 10 months for a lamb. This lamb is very tender.”

Raising lamb for sale along with training horses, raising cattle and tending chickens may sound overwhelming, but Bower and Hall make it work at their Kiowa, Colo., property.

“I try to blend it all together,” she said of the ranch’s eclectic list of chores. “Nothing satisfies me more than getting on a horse, taking my dog, going out and doing something with the cattle or moving the sheep out. It’s putting it all together, instead of making it all different things.”

Putting it all together looks like it will keep them in the lamb business for the long term.

“I love lambing,” she said with conviction. “I love working the dogs. And I like raising my own food. I think that’s cool. I’ve never been tempted to take them all to the sale and get rid of them,” she summed up about the flock. “I love having the cattle and the sheep and having that daily input. It’s fun to go out and see them grow. Sheep are soothing. I love to just go out there, sit on my horse and watch the sheep. That’s my cocktail hour.”

For more information about purchasing naturally raised grass fed lamb and grass fed beef from the Uh Oh Ranch please contact them at (719) 541-5550, http://www.UhOhRanch.com or e-mail UhOhRanch@fairpoint.net.

Most people in the United States associate sheep with wool, but Colorado has made a mark within the industry for a different reason. Like Idaho potatoes or Wisconsin cheese identifies a premium product in a consumer’s mind, the mile high state is becoming associated with producing some of the best lamb meat in the country, and small outfits like Mindy Bower and Kevin Hall at the Uh Oh Ranch east of Kiowa, Colo., take pride in the amount of care they put into their natural grass-fed lamb.

After starting nearly by accident in the business nine years ago, Bower has developed an ardent belief regarding the quality of naturally raised, grass fed lamb. Pressed by friends to take home a six-week old puppy she didn’t want at the time, Bower relented and introduced the pup to a ranch already brimming with training horses, raising cattle and collecting eggs.

That puppy turned into Wiz, a Border Collie with a gift for working and, before long, a whole new set of ranch responsibilities was born.

Beginning with five Columbia wool/meat sheep ewes to hone Wiz’s skills, Bower soon immersed herself into the “hair sheep” breeds of Katahdin and then Dorper as she and Hall saw a prime opportunity to increase the production of their 640 acres.

“I just wanted to play around with it, like training sheep,” described Bower of her genesis in the lamb industry. “Then I thought, well, since I have these sheep I might as well breed them. How fun would that be?” she remembered with laughter. “I have some good friends on the western slope and they have about 3,000 ewes and they graze them up on top of Vail Pass. That was my first exposure to really good lamb. I thought, I might as well do that, what the heck. So I got a Katahdin ram and bred him (and) I bred those five (Columbia ewes) to the ram and I loved that.”

Asked regarding the learning curve as a lamb producer starting with the first Katahdin sheep in their flock to the current small but attentive 90 head grass-fed flock of Katahdin, Dorper and crossbred sheep, Bower was candid with her experience. She discovered raising grass-fed Katahdin lamb took longer to reach butcher weight than expected, so she introduced the Dorper breed into her flock with positive results.

“I got the Dorpers and I was really happy,” she said of their maturation to butchering weight in 10 months. “The first year I used the Dorpers, I had no lambing issues (and) they can have three crop (of lambs) in two years.”

On top of rapid maturation and ease of lambing, Bower also found Dorper meat to have excellent flavor.

“I think with the Dorpers, they really are a mild taste,” she described while watching Will, one of her sheep dogs, guide the flock to pasture.

“Whenever we go to somebody’s place for a sheep dog clinic, it seems we are having lamb; so I’ve gotten to taste a lot of lamb. Once I started tasting that Dorper I was like, oh my gosh,” she recalled with enthusiasm.

“It is incredible. It is very mild, not gamey.”

Being a small producer at present, the Uh Oh Ranch’s lamb sales are primarily through word of mouth from loyal clientele.

“I sell a lot to Boulder,” she said of the current customer base. “I deliver it to them. My dad lived in Boulder (and) he had a whole team of caregivers. They like to know where their food is coming from (there), so people bought it and it kind of started to snowball.”

As a part of raising lamb and selling it to consumers whose criteria includes knowing where it came from and how it was raised, Bower also made a point to be satisfied with the facility where the lamb is processed.

“I take them to Innovative Foods up in Evans,” she said. “Family owned, USDA; they do everything (and) they do a beautiful job. Their pens have sand on the floors and fresh water. Other people don’t care if (the animals) get a drink before they get slaughtered, (but) they take a lot of pride in how they do it. I’ve never had an animal stressed (there). It’s very small, but they do a lot of stuff for Whole Foods and CSU.”

Knowing how the lamb is raised and processed is one matter; convincing a beef and poultry eating public to give it a serious try is another. In order to help overcome the initial challenge, Bower relayed information on the pro side of the lamb equation.

“It has the highest CLA (Conjugated Linoleic Acid) content,” she explained of its health benefits versus other meat as well as grain-fed meat.

“(CLA) is a good fat, so it helps fight cancer and it helps your heart. And grass fed lamb also has a higher Omega 3 content.” She continued to list more reasons.

“Lamb is so simple to raise and it’s not here for a long time,” she said regarding her product’s fresh taste and tenderness. “It takes about two years to finish a grass fed steer. It only takes 10 months for a lamb. This lamb is very tender.”

Raising lamb for sale along with training horses, raising cattle and tending chickens may sound overwhelming, but Bower and Hall make it work at their Kiowa, Colo., property.

“I try to blend it all together,” she said of the ranch’s eclectic list of chores. “Nothing satisfies me more than getting on a horse, taking my dog, going out and doing something with the cattle or moving the sheep out. It’s putting it all together, instead of making it all different things.”

Putting it all together looks like it will keep them in the lamb business for the long term.

“I love lambing,” she said with conviction. “I love working the dogs. And I like raising my own food. I think that’s cool. I’ve never been tempted to take them all to the sale and get rid of them,” she summed up about the flock. “I love having the cattle and the sheep and having that daily input. It’s fun to go out and see them grow. Sheep are soothing. I love to just go out there, sit on my horse and watch the sheep. That’s my cocktail hour.”

For more information about purchasing naturally raised grass fed lamb and grass fed beef from the Uh Oh Ranch please contact them at (719) 541-5550, http://www.UhOhRanch.com or e-mail UhOhRanch@fairpoint.net.

Most people in the United States associate sheep with wool, but Colorado has made a mark within the industry for a different reason. Like Idaho potatoes or Wisconsin cheese identifies a premium product in a consumer’s mind, the mile high state is becoming associated with producing some of the best lamb meat in the country, and small outfits like Mindy Bower and Kevin Hall at the Uh Oh Ranch east of Kiowa, Colo., take pride in the amount of care they put into their natural grass-fed lamb.

After starting nearly by accident in the business nine years ago, Bower has developed an ardent belief regarding the quality of naturally raised, grass fed lamb. Pressed by friends to take home a six-week old puppy she didn’t want at the time, Bower relented and introduced the pup to a ranch already brimming with training horses, raising cattle and collecting eggs.

That puppy turned into Wiz, a Border Collie with a gift for working and, before long, a whole new set of ranch responsibilities was born.

Beginning with five Columbia wool/meat sheep ewes to hone Wiz’s skills, Bower soon immersed herself into the “hair sheep” breeds of Katahdin and then Dorper as she and Hall saw a prime opportunity to increase the production of their 640 acres.

“I just wanted to play around with it, like training sheep,” described Bower of her genesis in the lamb industry. “Then I thought, well, since I have these sheep I might as well breed them. How fun would that be?” she remembered with laughter. “I have some good friends on the western slope and they have about 3,000 ewes and they graze them up on top of Vail Pass. That was my first exposure to really good lamb. I thought, I might as well do that, what the heck. So I got a Katahdin ram and bred him (and) I bred those five (Columbia ewes) to the ram and I loved that.”

Asked regarding the learning curve as a lamb producer starting with the first Katahdin sheep in their flock to the current small but attentive 90 head grass-fed flock of Katahdin, Dorper and crossbred sheep, Bower was candid with her experience. She discovered raising grass-fed Katahdin lamb took longer to reach butcher weight than expected, so she introduced the Dorper breed into her flock with positive results.

“I got the Dorpers and I was really happy,” she said of their maturation to butchering weight in 10 months. “The first year I used the Dorpers, I had no lambing issues (and) they can have three crop (of lambs) in two years.”

On top of rapid maturation and ease of lambing, Bower also found Dorper meat to have excellent flavor.

“I think with the Dorpers, they really are a mild taste,” she described while watching Will, one of her sheep dogs, guide the flock to pasture.

“Whenever we go to somebody’s place for a sheep dog clinic, it seems we are having lamb; so I’ve gotten to taste a lot of lamb. Once I started tasting that Dorper I was like, oh my gosh,” she recalled with enthusiasm.

“It is incredible. It is very mild, not gamey.”

Being a small producer at present, the Uh Oh Ranch’s lamb sales are primarily through word of mouth from loyal clientele.

“I sell a lot to Boulder,” she said of the current customer base. “I deliver it to them. My dad lived in Boulder (and) he had a whole team of caregivers. They like to know where their food is coming from (there), so people bought it and it kind of started to snowball.”

As a part of raising lamb and selling it to consumers whose criteria includes knowing where it came from and how it was raised, Bower also made a point to be satisfied with the facility where the lamb is processed.

“I take them to Innovative Foods up in Evans,” she said. “Family owned, USDA; they do everything (and) they do a beautiful job. Their pens have sand on the floors and fresh water. Other people don’t care if (the animals) get a drink before they get slaughtered, (but) they take a lot of pride in how they do it. I’ve never had an animal stressed (there). It’s very small, but they do a lot of stuff for Whole Foods and CSU.”

Knowing how the lamb is raised and processed is one matter; convincing a beef and poultry eating public to give it a serious try is another. In order to help overcome the initial challenge, Bower relayed information on the pro side of the lamb equation.

“It has the highest CLA (Conjugated Linoleic Acid) content,” she explained of its health benefits versus other meat as well as grain-fed meat.

“(CLA) is a good fat, so it helps fight cancer and it helps your heart. And grass fed lamb also has a higher Omega 3 content.” She continued to list more reasons.

“Lamb is so simple to raise and it’s not here for a long time,” she said regarding her product’s fresh taste and tenderness. “It takes about two years to finish a grass fed steer. It only takes 10 months for a lamb. This lamb is very tender.”

Raising lamb for sale along with training horses, raising cattle and tending chickens may sound overwhelming, but Bower and Hall make it work at their Kiowa, Colo., property.

“I try to blend it all together,” she said of the ranch’s eclectic list of chores. “Nothing satisfies me more than getting on a horse, taking my dog, going out and doing something with the cattle or moving the sheep out. It’s putting it all together, instead of making it all different things.”

Putting it all together looks like it will keep them in the lamb business for the long term.

“I love lambing,” she said with conviction. “I love working the dogs. And I like raising my own food. I think that’s cool. I’ve never been tempted to take them all to the sale and get rid of them,” she summed up about the flock. “I love having the cattle and the sheep and having that daily input. It’s fun to go out and see them grow. Sheep are soothing. I love to just go out there, sit on my horse and watch the sheep. That’s my cocktail hour.”

For more information about purchasing naturally raised grass fed lamb and grass fed beef from the Uh Oh Ranch please contact them at (719) 541-5550, http://www.UhOhRanch.com or e-mail UhOhRanch@fairpoint.net.

Most people in the United States associate sheep with wool, but Colorado has made a mark within the industry for a different reason. Like Idaho potatoes or Wisconsin cheese identifies a premium product in a consumer’s mind, the mile high state is becoming associated with producing some of the best lamb meat in the country, and small outfits like Mindy Bower and Kevin Hall at the Uh Oh Ranch east of Kiowa, Colo., take pride in the amount of care they put into their natural grass-fed lamb.

After starting nearly by accident in the business nine years ago, Bower has developed an ardent belief regarding the quality of naturally raised, grass fed lamb. Pressed by friends to take home a six-week old puppy she didn’t want at the time, Bower relented and introduced the pup to a ranch already brimming with training horses, raising cattle and collecting eggs.

That puppy turned into Wiz, a Border Collie with a gift for working and, before long, a whole new set of ranch responsibilities was born.

Beginning with five Columbia wool/meat sheep ewes to hone Wiz’s skills, Bower soon immersed herself into the “hair sheep” breeds of Katahdin and then Dorper as she and Hall saw a prime opportunity to increase the production of their 640 acres.

“I just wanted to play around with it, like training sheep,” described Bower of her genesis in the lamb industry. “Then I thought, well, since I have these sheep I might as well breed them. How fun would that be?” she remembered with laughter. “I have some good friends on the western slope and they have about 3,000 ewes and they graze them up on top of Vail Pass. That was my first exposure to really good lamb. I thought, I might as well do that, what the heck. So I got a Katahdin ram and bred him (and) I bred those five (Columbia ewes) to the ram and I loved that.”

Asked regarding the learning curve as a lamb producer starting with the first Katahdin sheep in their flock to the current small but attentive 90 head grass-fed flock of Katahdin, Dorper and crossbred sheep, Bower was candid with her experience. She discovered raising grass-fed Katahdin lamb took longer to reach butcher weight than expected, so she introduced the Dorper breed into her flock with positive results.

“I got the Dorpers and I was really happy,” she said of their maturation to butchering weight in 10 months. “The first year I used the Dorpers, I had no lambing issues (and) they can have three crop (of lambs) in two years.”

On top of rapid maturation and ease of lambing, Bower also found Dorper meat to have excellent flavor.

“I think with the Dorpers, they really are a mild taste,” she described while watching Will, one of her sheep dogs, guide the flock to pasture.

“Whenever we go to somebody’s place for a sheep dog clinic, it seems we are having lamb; so I’ve gotten to taste a lot of lamb. Once I started tasting that Dorper I was like, oh my gosh,” she recalled with enthusiasm.

“It is incredible. It is very mild, not gamey.”

Being a small producer at present, the Uh Oh Ranch’s lamb sales are primarily through word of mouth from loyal clientele.

“I sell a lot to Boulder,” she said of the current customer base. “I deliver it to them. My dad lived in Boulder (and) he had a whole team of caregivers. They like to know where their food is coming from (there), so people bought it and it kind of started to snowball.”

As a part of raising lamb and selling it to consumers whose criteria includes knowing where it came from and how it was raised, Bower also made a point to be satisfied with the facility where the lamb is processed.

“I take them to Innovative Foods up in Evans,” she said. “Family owned, USDA; they do everything (and) they do a beautiful job. Their pens have sand on the floors and fresh water. Other people don’t care if (the animals) get a drink before they get slaughtered, (but) they take a lot of pride in how they do it. I’ve never had an animal stressed (there). It’s very small, but they do a lot of stuff for Whole Foods and CSU.”

Knowing how the lamb is raised and processed is one matter; convincing a beef and poultry eating public to give it a serious try is another. In order to help overcome the initial challenge, Bower relayed information on the pro side of the lamb equation.

“It has the highest CLA (Conjugated Linoleic Acid) content,” she explained of its health benefits versus other meat as well as grain-fed meat.

“(CLA) is a good fat, so it helps fight cancer and it helps your heart. And grass fed lamb also has a higher Omega 3 content.” She continued to list more reasons.

“Lamb is so simple to raise and it’s not here for a long time,” she said regarding her product’s fresh taste and tenderness. “It takes about two years to finish a grass fed steer. It only takes 10 months for a lamb. This lamb is very tender.”

Raising lamb for sale along with training horses, raising cattle and tending chickens may sound overwhelming, but Bower and Hall make it work at their Kiowa, Colo., property.

“I try to blend it all together,” she said of the ranch’s eclectic list of chores. “Nothing satisfies me more than getting on a horse, taking my dog, going out and doing something with the cattle or moving the sheep out. It’s putting it all together, instead of making it all different things.”

Putting it all together looks like it will keep them in the lamb business for the long term.

“I love lambing,” she said with conviction. “I love working the dogs. And I like raising my own food. I think that’s cool. I’ve never been tempted to take them all to the sale and get rid of them,” she summed up about the flock. “I love having the cattle and the sheep and having that daily input. It’s fun to go out and see them grow. Sheep are soothing. I love to just go out there, sit on my horse and watch the sheep. That’s my cocktail hour.”

For more information about purchasing naturally raised grass fed lamb and grass fed beef from the Uh Oh Ranch please contact them at (719) 541-5550, http://www.UhOhRanch.com or e-mail UhOhRanch@fairpoint.net.

Most people in the United States associate sheep with wool, but Colorado has made a mark within the industry for a different reason. Like Idaho potatoes or Wisconsin cheese identifies a premium product in a consumer’s mind, the mile high state is becoming associated with producing some of the best lamb meat in the country, and small outfits like Mindy Bower and Kevin Hall at the Uh Oh Ranch east of Kiowa, Colo., take pride in the amount of care they put into their natural grass-fed lamb.

After starting nearly by accident in the business nine years ago, Bower has developed an ardent belief regarding the quality of naturally raised, grass fed lamb. Pressed by friends to take home a six-week old puppy she didn’t want at the time, Bower relented and introduced the pup to a ranch already brimming with training horses, raising cattle and collecting eggs.

That puppy turned into Wiz, a Border Collie with a gift for working and, before long, a whole new set of ranch responsibilities was born.

Beginning with five Columbia wool/meat sheep ewes to hone Wiz’s skills, Bower soon immersed herself into the “hair sheep” breeds of Katahdin and then Dorper as she and Hall saw a prime opportunity to increase the production of their 640 acres.

“I just wanted to play around with it, like training sheep,” described Bower of her genesis in the lamb industry. “Then I thought, well, since I have these sheep I might as well breed them. How fun would that be?” she remembered with laughter. “I have some good friends on the western slope and they have about 3,000 ewes and they graze them up on top of Vail Pass. That was my first exposure to really good lamb. I thought, I might as well do that, what the heck. So I got a Katahdin ram and bred him (and) I bred those five (Columbia ewes) to the ram and I loved that.”

Asked regarding the learning curve as a lamb producer starting with the first Katahdin sheep in their flock to the current small but attentive 90 head grass-fed flock of Katahdin, Dorper and crossbred sheep, Bower was candid with her experience. She discovered raising grass-fed Katahdin lamb took longer to reach butcher weight than expected, so she introduced the Dorper breed into her flock with positive results.

“I got the Dorpers and I was really happy,” she said of their maturation to butchering weight in 10 months. “The first year I used the Dorpers, I had no lambing issues (and) they can have three crop (of lambs) in two years.”

On top of rapid maturation and ease of lambing, Bower also found Dorper meat to have excellent flavor.

“I think with the Dorpers, they really are a mild taste,” she described while watching Will, one of her sheep dogs, guide the flock to pasture.

“Whenever we go to somebody’s place for a sheep dog clinic, it seems we are having lamb; so I’ve gotten to taste a lot of lamb. Once I started tasting that Dorper I was like, oh my gosh,” she recalled with enthusiasm.

“It is incredible. It is very mild, not gamey.”

Being a small producer at present, the Uh Oh Ranch’s lamb sales are primarily through word of mouth from loyal clientele.

“I sell a lot to Boulder,” she said of the current customer base. “I deliver it to them. My dad lived in Boulder (and) he had a whole team of caregivers. They like to know where their food is coming from (there), so people bought it and it kind of started to snowball.”

As a part of raising lamb and selling it to consumers whose criteria includes knowing where it came from and how it was raised, Bower also made a point to be satisfied with the facility where the lamb is processed.

“I take them to Innovative Foods up in Evans,” she said. “Family owned, USDA; they do everything (and) they do a beautiful job. Their pens have sand on the floors and fresh water. Other people don’t care if (the animals) get a drink before they get slaughtered, (but) they take a lot of pride in how they do it. I’ve never had an animal stressed (there). It’s very small, but they do a lot of stuff for Whole Foods and CSU.”

Knowing how the lamb is raised and processed is one matter; convincing a beef and poultry eating public to give it a serious try is another. In order to help overcome the initial challenge, Bower relayed information on the pro side of the lamb equation.

“It has the highest CLA (Conjugated Linoleic Acid) content,” she explained of its health benefits versus other meat as well as grain-fed meat.

“(CLA) is a good fat, so it helps fight cancer and it helps your heart. And grass fed lamb also has a higher Omega 3 content.” She continued to list more reasons.

“Lamb is so simple to raise and it’s not here for a long time,” she said regarding her product’s fresh taste and tenderness. “It takes about two years to finish a grass fed steer. It only takes 10 months for a lamb. This lamb is very tender.”

Raising lamb for sale along with training horses, raising cattle and tending chickens may sound overwhelming, but Bower and Hall make it work at their Kiowa, Colo., property.

“I try to blend it all together,” she said of the ranch’s eclectic list of chores. “Nothing satisfies me more than getting on a horse, taking my dog, going out and doing something with the cattle or moving the sheep out. It’s putting it all together, instead of making it all different things.”

Putting it all together looks like it will keep them in the lamb business for the long term.

“I love lambing,” she said with conviction. “I love working the dogs. And I like raising my own food. I think that’s cool. I’ve never been tempted to take them all to the sale and get rid of them,” she summed up about the flock. “I love having the cattle and the sheep and having that daily input. It’s fun to go out and see them grow. Sheep are soothing. I love to just go out there, sit on my horse and watch the sheep. That’s my cocktail hour.”

For more information about purchasing naturally raised grass fed lamb and grass fed beef from the Uh Oh Ranch please contact them at (719) 541-5550, http://www.UhOhRanch.com or e-mail UhOhRanch@fairpoint.net.