Ranching, riding and roping: the WRCA at the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo | TheFencePost.com
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Ranching, riding and roping: the WRCA at the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo

by Lincoln Rogers Parker, Colo.
The overall winners of the Denver ranch rodeo, the High Card/Conley Ranch team from Texas, prepares to start the Stray Gathering event, where they placed second with a time of 112.16 seconds.
Stray Gathering |
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The cowboys came back to town, setting up shop at the National Western Complex for a Saturday night of rodeo action during the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo. Only this time, it was the real deal.

The Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) brought 12 teams of authentic, weathered, and calloused cowboys from ranches in Texas, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico, and Colorado to compete against each other in the first ever Denver Championship WRCA Ranch Rodeo. Their friendly rivalry encompassed Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Ranch Branding, Ranch Sorting, and Wild Cow Milking in a quest for a title, a passel of prizes, and the chance to qualify for the WRCA Finals held in Amarillo, Texas every November.

“We’ve got to do (events) like this to let people know this is how it started,” said legendary rodeo stock contractor, Harry Vold, about the cowboy way of life. Vold supplied the bucking stock for the ranch rodeo, and he was happy to be associated with an event displaying the abilities of real cowboys to the general public. “This here is the real thing, with good cowboys and good horses that work on a ranch every day,” he continued. “I’m very proud of the event. It’s different, but it’s good. It gives these ranch cowboys something to come to. I think it‘s very good entertainment.”

The cowboys came back to town, setting up shop at the National Western Complex for a Saturday night of rodeo action during the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo. Only this time, it was the real deal.

The Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) brought 12 teams of authentic, weathered, and calloused cowboys from ranches in Texas, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico, and Colorado to compete against each other in the first ever Denver Championship WRCA Ranch Rodeo. Their friendly rivalry encompassed Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Ranch Branding, Ranch Sorting, and Wild Cow Milking in a quest for a title, a passel of prizes, and the chance to qualify for the WRCA Finals held in Amarillo, Texas every November.

“We’ve got to do (events) like this to let people know this is how it started,” said legendary rodeo stock contractor, Harry Vold, about the cowboy way of life. Vold supplied the bucking stock for the ranch rodeo, and he was happy to be associated with an event displaying the abilities of real cowboys to the general public. “This here is the real thing, with good cowboys and good horses that work on a ranch every day,” he continued. “I’m very proud of the event. It’s different, but it’s good. It gives these ranch cowboys something to come to. I think it‘s very good entertainment.”

The cowboys came back to town, setting up shop at the National Western Complex for a Saturday night of rodeo action during the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo. Only this time, it was the real deal.

The Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) brought 12 teams of authentic, weathered, and calloused cowboys from ranches in Texas, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico, and Colorado to compete against each other in the first ever Denver Championship WRCA Ranch Rodeo. Their friendly rivalry encompassed Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Ranch Branding, Ranch Sorting, and Wild Cow Milking in a quest for a title, a passel of prizes, and the chance to qualify for the WRCA Finals held in Amarillo, Texas every November.

“We’ve got to do (events) like this to let people know this is how it started,” said legendary rodeo stock contractor, Harry Vold, about the cowboy way of life. Vold supplied the bucking stock for the ranch rodeo, and he was happy to be associated with an event displaying the abilities of real cowboys to the general public. “This here is the real thing, with good cowboys and good horses that work on a ranch every day,” he continued. “I’m very proud of the event. It’s different, but it’s good. It gives these ranch cowboys something to come to. I think it‘s very good entertainment.”

The cowboys came back to town, setting up shop at the National Western Complex for a Saturday night of rodeo action during the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo. Only this time, it was the real deal.

The Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) brought 12 teams of authentic, weathered, and calloused cowboys from ranches in Texas, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico, and Colorado to compete against each other in the first ever Denver Championship WRCA Ranch Rodeo. Their friendly rivalry encompassed Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Ranch Branding, Ranch Sorting, and Wild Cow Milking in a quest for a title, a passel of prizes, and the chance to qualify for the WRCA Finals held in Amarillo, Texas every November.

“We’ve got to do (events) like this to let people know this is how it started,” said legendary rodeo stock contractor, Harry Vold, about the cowboy way of life. Vold supplied the bucking stock for the ranch rodeo, and he was happy to be associated with an event displaying the abilities of real cowboys to the general public. “This here is the real thing, with good cowboys and good horses that work on a ranch every day,” he continued. “I’m very proud of the event. It’s different, but it’s good. It gives these ranch cowboys something to come to. I think it‘s very good entertainment.”

The cowboys came back to town, setting up shop at the National Western Complex for a Saturday night of rodeo action during the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo. Only this time, it was the real deal.

The Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) brought 12 teams of authentic, weathered, and calloused cowboys from ranches in Texas, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico, and Colorado to compete against each other in the first ever Denver Championship WRCA Ranch Rodeo. Their friendly rivalry encompassed Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Ranch Branding, Ranch Sorting, and Wild Cow Milking in a quest for a title, a passel of prizes, and the chance to qualify for the WRCA Finals held in Amarillo, Texas every November.

“We’ve got to do (events) like this to let people know this is how it started,” said legendary rodeo stock contractor, Harry Vold, about the cowboy way of life. Vold supplied the bucking stock for the ranch rodeo, and he was happy to be associated with an event displaying the abilities of real cowboys to the general public. “This here is the real thing, with good cowboys and good horses that work on a ranch every day,” he continued. “I’m very proud of the event. It’s different, but it’s good. It gives these ranch cowboys something to come to. I think it‘s very good entertainment.”


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