Range Cow Symposium featured food for thought | TheFencePost.com

Range Cow Symposium featured food for thought

Gayle Smith Potter, Neb.

They say knowledge is power, and there was plenty to be gained for producers attending the Range Beef Cow Symposium in Mitchell, Neb. Although the focus of the meeting was “Positioning the Range Beef Herd for the Next 25 Years,” speakers presented a wide range of topics from cost of production, current inventory, and feeding range cattle, to supplementing income with wildlife, land use decisions and passing land down to future generations.

During the breaks, producers visited a trade show with everything from live cattle displays and breed associations to marketing and feeding cattle. This year’s event featured something for everyone. During one break, Lynn Allen of Stratford, Texas, visited with Bubba Bain, who was there to promote Akaushi cattle. Bain said the breed was introduced to the United States by Japan in 1994. The nucleus of the US herd was eight females and three males. In Japan, the breed is valued for its health benefits and high quality of beef.

Outside, Thad Emerson of Emerson Equipment in Whitman, Neb., demonstrated a Northstar Q-Catch chute. “What is unique about this chute,” he explained, “is it has a unique friction lock headgate to make cattle handling easier.”

A pen of Hereford bulls brought by Jay Middleswarth of Middleswarth Herefords near Henry, Neb., captured a lot of attention during the symposium as ranchers stepped outside to visit with Middleswarth and learn about his operation. The event proved to be a good marketing tool for the Hereford breeder.

During the symposium, Ivan Rush, professor emeritus with the University of Nebraska, reiterated to a crowd of over 500, that beef prices are good, but what others outside the beef industry don’t realize is input costs are higher. Producers need higher prices just to stay competitive in the game, he explained.

The demand for corn by the ethanol industry is one reason beef input costs have increased. Ted Schroeder, agricultural economist with Kansas State University, reminded producers that the ethanol industry is not new to the United States, and has grown at a steady pace since the late 70s. “The demand for ethanol became evident in about 2002, when US automakers rapidly expanded their E-85 auto production,” he explained. “In 2005, Congress passed a Renewable Fuels Standard that mandated doubling the use of renewable fuels by 2012.”

Recommended Stories For You

Schroeder said in the 90s, about 5 percent of the corn was used to make ethanol. By 2011, that number was 40 percent. “We may be close to the mandate for ethanol, but we are exporting, so the industry may continue to expand as long as it’s profitable,” he said.

They say knowledge is power, and there was plenty to be gained for producers attending the Range Beef Cow Symposium in Mitchell, Neb. Although the focus of the meeting was “Positioning the Range Beef Herd for the Next 25 Years,” speakers presented a wide range of topics from cost of production, current inventory, and feeding range cattle, to supplementing income with wildlife, land use decisions and passing land down to future generations.

During the breaks, producers visited a trade show with everything from live cattle displays and breed associations to marketing and feeding cattle. This year’s event featured something for everyone. During one break, Lynn Allen of Stratford, Texas, visited with Bubba Bain, who was there to promote Akaushi cattle. Bain said the breed was introduced to the United States by Japan in 1994. The nucleus of the US herd was eight females and three males. In Japan, the breed is valued for its health benefits and high quality of beef.

Outside, Thad Emerson of Emerson Equipment in Whitman, Neb., demonstrated a Northstar Q-Catch chute. “What is unique about this chute,” he explained, “is it has a unique friction lock headgate to make cattle handling easier.”

A pen of Hereford bulls brought by Jay Middleswarth of Middleswarth Herefords near Henry, Neb., captured a lot of attention during the symposium as ranchers stepped outside to visit with Middleswarth and learn about his operation. The event proved to be a good marketing tool for the Hereford breeder.

During the symposium, Ivan Rush, professor emeritus with the University of Nebraska, reiterated to a crowd of over 500, that beef prices are good, but what others outside the beef industry don’t realize is input costs are higher. Producers need higher prices just to stay competitive in the game, he explained.

The demand for corn by the ethanol industry is one reason beef input costs have increased. Ted Schroeder, agricultural economist with Kansas State University, reminded producers that the ethanol industry is not new to the United States, and has grown at a steady pace since the late 70s. “The demand for ethanol became evident in about 2002, when US automakers rapidly expanded their E-85 auto production,” he explained. “In 2005, Congress passed a Renewable Fuels Standard that mandated doubling the use of renewable fuels by 2012.”

Schroeder said in the 90s, about 5 percent of the corn was used to make ethanol. By 2011, that number was 40 percent. “We may be close to the mandate for ethanol, but we are exporting, so the industry may continue to expand as long as it’s profitable,” he said.

They say knowledge is power, and there was plenty to be gained for producers attending the Range Beef Cow Symposium in Mitchell, Neb. Although the focus of the meeting was “Positioning the Range Beef Herd for the Next 25 Years,” speakers presented a wide range of topics from cost of production, current inventory, and feeding range cattle, to supplementing income with wildlife, land use decisions and passing land down to future generations.

During the breaks, producers visited a trade show with everything from live cattle displays and breed associations to marketing and feeding cattle. This year’s event featured something for everyone. During one break, Lynn Allen of Stratford, Texas, visited with Bubba Bain, who was there to promote Akaushi cattle. Bain said the breed was introduced to the United States by Japan in 1994. The nucleus of the US herd was eight females and three males. In Japan, the breed is valued for its health benefits and high quality of beef.

Outside, Thad Emerson of Emerson Equipment in Whitman, Neb., demonstrated a Northstar Q-Catch chute. “What is unique about this chute,” he explained, “is it has a unique friction lock headgate to make cattle handling easier.”

A pen of Hereford bulls brought by Jay Middleswarth of Middleswarth Herefords near Henry, Neb., captured a lot of attention during the symposium as ranchers stepped outside to visit with Middleswarth and learn about his operation. The event proved to be a good marketing tool for the Hereford breeder.

During the symposium, Ivan Rush, professor emeritus with the University of Nebraska, reiterated to a crowd of over 500, that beef prices are good, but what others outside the beef industry don’t realize is input costs are higher. Producers need higher prices just to stay competitive in the game, he explained.

The demand for corn by the ethanol industry is one reason beef input costs have increased. Ted Schroeder, agricultural economist with Kansas State University, reminded producers that the ethanol industry is not new to the United States, and has grown at a steady pace since the late 70s. “The demand for ethanol became evident in about 2002, when US automakers rapidly expanded their E-85 auto production,” he explained. “In 2005, Congress passed a Renewable Fuels Standard that mandated doubling the use of renewable fuels by 2012.”

Schroeder said in the 90s, about 5 percent of the corn was used to make ethanol. By 2011, that number was 40 percent. “We may be close to the mandate for ethanol, but we are exporting, so the industry may continue to expand as long as it’s profitable,” he said.

They say knowledge is power, and there was plenty to be gained for producers attending the Range Beef Cow Symposium in Mitchell, Neb. Although the focus of the meeting was “Positioning the Range Beef Herd for the Next 25 Years,” speakers presented a wide range of topics from cost of production, current inventory, and feeding range cattle, to supplementing income with wildlife, land use decisions and passing land down to future generations.

During the breaks, producers visited a trade show with everything from live cattle displays and breed associations to marketing and feeding cattle. This year’s event featured something for everyone. During one break, Lynn Allen of Stratford, Texas, visited with Bubba Bain, who was there to promote Akaushi cattle. Bain said the breed was introduced to the United States by Japan in 1994. The nucleus of the US herd was eight females and three males. In Japan, the breed is valued for its health benefits and high quality of beef.

Outside, Thad Emerson of Emerson Equipment in Whitman, Neb., demonstrated a Northstar Q-Catch chute. “What is unique about this chute,” he explained, “is it has a unique friction lock headgate to make cattle handling easier.”

A pen of Hereford bulls brought by Jay Middleswarth of Middleswarth Herefords near Henry, Neb., captured a lot of attention during the symposium as ranchers stepped outside to visit with Middleswarth and learn about his operation. The event proved to be a good marketing tool for the Hereford breeder.

During the symposium, Ivan Rush, professor emeritus with the University of Nebraska, reiterated to a crowd of over 500, that beef prices are good, but what others outside the beef industry don’t realize is input costs are higher. Producers need higher prices just to stay competitive in the game, he explained.

The demand for corn by the ethanol industry is one reason beef input costs have increased. Ted Schroeder, agricultural economist with Kansas State University, reminded producers that the ethanol industry is not new to the United States, and has grown at a steady pace since the late 70s. “The demand for ethanol became evident in about 2002, when US automakers rapidly expanded their E-85 auto production,” he explained. “In 2005, Congress passed a Renewable Fuels Standard that mandated doubling the use of renewable fuels by 2012.”

Schroeder said in the 90s, about 5 percent of the corn was used to make ethanol. By 2011, that number was 40 percent. “We may be close to the mandate for ethanol, but we are exporting, so the industry may continue to expand as long as it’s profitable,” he said.