Rawhide N ‘Roo focus on custom rawhide, leather tack, jewelry | TheFencePost.com

Rawhide N ‘Roo focus on custom rawhide, leather tack, jewelry

Gayle Smith
Gering, Neb.

A double ear rawhide headstall with silver buckle.

Some of the most sought after rawhide and leather tack and jewelry is produced on the Colorado Plains near the small town of Fleming, Colo.

Dee Jensen became interested in working with rawhide after deciding to try to make a headstall she couldn’t afford. “A gentleman who worked with my husband made these items, and had a book that showed how to do it. He copied some of the pages so I could practice the knots,” she explained.

Afterward, Dee said she spent many cold winter evenings practicing and perfecting her knot tying, and making the headstall. “When I actually finished it, someone wanted to buy it, so I made another, and someone wanted to buy it. That was how our business got started.”

Today, Dee, and husband, Les, operate Rawhide N ‘Roo, which is a rawhide braiding and leather tack business that mostly thrives on custom work. “Customization is our biggest selling point,” Dee explained. “People see something and will want us to make it bigger or smaller. Sometimes, they will see two different headstalls, and want us to make a custom headstall combining parts of the two together. Our customers’ ideas are what has made our business so popular.”

The business has become very successful over the years, which Dee and Les attribute to their faith in God. “God has totally blessed this business and given us the gifts to do what we do,” she said.

Dee makes tack items and jewelry, braiding both rawhide and kangaroo leather. “The kangaroo leather is used to make romal reins, hobbles and headstalls. Kangaroo is actually supposed to be stronger than cowhide,” she explained. “What I like about it is that it can be dyed whatever color I need, so I can offer our customers a variety of colors.”

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“Because of the color variation of it, I like to use it in some of my knots to give them a color variation,” she continued. “The kangaroo leather is very easy to work with because it doesn’t have to be wet to work with it. It is a softer leather, and can be used to give the items I make more variation.”

The rawhide is more challenging, Dee admits. “A lot of the working with rawhide is done in stages. Rawhide has to be allowed to dry. As it dries, it shrinks and tightens down. When you are working with it, you have to make sure your knots are right.”

Out of the many items they make, Dee said, bosals are the most complicated. “There are a lot of bosals on the market, but a lot of them don’t have a rawhide core. The rawhide core is made of twisted rawhide, which Les does. It was a learning process to make these, because you have to braid over the core, and braid over the nose button, which were the hardest things for me to learn how to do.”

Although she has never formally studied knot tying, Dee said she purchased a copy of the book she originally learned from along with some DVDs. Occasionally, she has called people who teach braiding, if she hits a particular rough spot. “Everyone has always been very gracious about helping me when I need it. My braiding is still a work in progress,” she said.

Some of the items Les and Dee specialize in are leather romal reins and rawhide braided romal reins, headstalls made from leather or rawhide, kangaroo leather hobbles, rawhide and leather bosals with rawhide cores, side pulls, loping bridles, spur straps, cavessons, breast collars, and bracelets, barrettes and shooflies. “We also carry high quality bits and spurs, but we don’t make those,” she said.

“Shooflies are probably the most unique item we make,” she explained. “They are a personal memento we make for horse owners who have lost their horse. It takes some advance planning to make one, because they are made from the hair on the horse’s tail. They are very popular, and we make a lot of them. We also added a little medal name tag with the horse’s name engraved on it, to give it a personalized feel.”

Originally, shooflies were used with work horses to keep the flies away. A lot of people also use them on their cinches to keep flies away from their performance horses. “Someone asked us to make one after they had lost their horse, and the idea evolved from there,” she said.

The couple has also made a lot of awards for clubs and groups, such as breast collars, headstalls, and spur straps. “Les can either stamp on the leather, or we can have custom buckles made,” she said.

Dee also makes a line of rawhide barrettes and bracelets, which she designs herself. “I have never seen anyone else who makes rawhide barrettes,” she said. “After an article about the ones I make appeared in Western Horseman, I sold quite a few and had a lot of repeat customers. The rawhide bracelets are a little pricier because they are more time-consuming for me to make. But, I can customize them by making them bigger or smaller so they fit the wrist correctly. If someone wants something particular on them, all they have to do is ask, and I will try it if it is possible.”

Dee can also make the barrettes, with interchangeable conchos, for a different “look.” She has cochos with everything from cutters, ropers, and barrel racers, to crosses, cactus, steer heads, and hearts. Customers can purchase one barrette and several conchos.

New this year are rawhide hondas, and leather fly swatters. “The fly swatters are just adorable,” Dee said. “They have a leather swatter on the end of a wooden dowel handle. Les can either make them plain, or put a brand or leather initials on them.” Dee said the item has proved to already be a popular Christmas gift. The fly swatter is $15 for plain, or $20 for ones with the brand or initials on them.

The store has no set hours, Dee said. “Most people just stop in and take a look. We have some stuff made up, but the biggest part of our business is custom work. If someone needs something unique or different, we are always open to trying something new.”

The couple can also do repair work, both on leather tack and rawhide, and kangaroo leather items.

Most of their business is through word-of-mouth or through their website: http://www.RawhideAndRoo.com. “Depending on our work schedule and what we have made, we might attend some horse sales or rodeos,” she explained. “If someone has something they would like us to attend, they can give us a call. Depending on the distance, we may be interested in coming.”

Some of the most sought after rawhide and leather tack and jewelry is produced on the Colorado Plains near the small town of Fleming, Colo.

Dee Jensen became interested in working with rawhide after deciding to try to make a headstall she couldn’t afford. “A gentleman who worked with my husband made these items, and had a book that showed how to do it. He copied some of the pages so I could practice the knots,” she explained.

Afterward, Dee said she spent many cold winter evenings practicing and perfecting her knot tying, and making the headstall. “When I actually finished it, someone wanted to buy it, so I made another, and someone wanted to buy it. That was how our business got started.”

Today, Dee, and husband, Les, operate Rawhide N ‘Roo, which is a rawhide braiding and leather tack business that mostly thrives on custom work. “Customization is our biggest selling point,” Dee explained. “People see something and will want us to make it bigger or smaller. Sometimes, they will see two different headstalls, and want us to make a custom headstall combining parts of the two together. Our customers’ ideas are what has made our business so popular.”

The business has become very successful over the years, which Dee and Les attribute to their faith in God. “God has totally blessed this business and given us the gifts to do what we do,” she said.

Dee makes tack items and jewelry, braiding both rawhide and kangaroo leather. “The kangaroo leather is used to make romal reins, hobbles and headstalls. Kangaroo is actually supposed to be stronger than cowhide,” she explained. “What I like about it is that it can be dyed whatever color I need, so I can offer our customers a variety of colors.”

“Because of the color variation of it, I like to use it in some of my knots to give them a color variation,” she continued. “The kangaroo leather is very easy to work with because it doesn’t have to be wet to work with it. It is a softer leather, and can be used to give the items I make more variation.”

The rawhide is more challenging, Dee admits. “A lot of the working with rawhide is done in stages. Rawhide has to be allowed to dry. As it dries, it shrinks and tightens down. When you are working with it, you have to make sure your knots are right.”

Out of the many items they make, Dee said, bosals are the most complicated. “There are a lot of bosals on the market, but a lot of them don’t have a rawhide core. The rawhide core is made of twisted rawhide, which Les does. It was a learning process to make these, because you have to braid over the core, and braid over the nose button, which were the hardest things for me to learn how to do.”

Although she has never formally studied knot tying, Dee said she purchased a copy of the book she originally learned from along with some DVDs. Occasionally, she has called people who teach braiding, if she hits a particular rough spot. “Everyone has always been very gracious about helping me when I need it. My braiding is still a work in progress,” she said.

Some of the items Les and Dee specialize in are leather romal reins and rawhide braided romal reins, headstalls made from leather or rawhide, kangaroo leather hobbles, rawhide and leather bosals with rawhide cores, side pulls, loping bridles, spur straps, cavessons, breast collars, and bracelets, barrettes and shooflies. “We also carry high quality bits and spurs, but we don’t make those,” she said.

“Shooflies are probably the most unique item we make,” she explained. “They are a personal memento we make for horse owners who have lost their horse. It takes some advance planning to make one, because they are made from the hair on the horse’s tail. They are very popular, and we make a lot of them. We also added a little medal name tag with the horse’s name engraved on it, to give it a personalized feel.”

Originally, shooflies were used with work horses to keep the flies away. A lot of people also use them on their cinches to keep flies away from their performance horses. “Someone asked us to make one after they had lost their horse, and the idea evolved from there,” she said.

The couple has also made a lot of awards for clubs and groups, such as breast collars, headstalls, and spur straps. “Les can either stamp on the leather, or we can have custom buckles made,” she said.

Dee also makes a line of rawhide barrettes and bracelets, which she designs herself. “I have never seen anyone else who makes rawhide barrettes,” she said. “After an article about the ones I make appeared in Western Horseman, I sold quite a few and had a lot of repeat customers. The rawhide bracelets are a little pricier because they are more time-consuming for me to make. But, I can customize them by making them bigger or smaller so they fit the wrist correctly. If someone wants something particular on them, all they have to do is ask, and I will try it if it is possible.”

Dee can also make the barrettes, with interchangeable conchos, for a different “look.” She has cochos with everything from cutters, ropers, and barrel racers, to crosses, cactus, steer heads, and hearts. Customers can purchase one barrette and several conchos.

New this year are rawhide hondas, and leather fly swatters. “The fly swatters are just adorable,” Dee said. “They have a leather swatter on the end of a wooden dowel handle. Les can either make them plain, or put a brand or leather initials on them.” Dee said the item has proved to already be a popular Christmas gift. The fly swatter is $15 for plain, or $20 for ones with the brand or initials on them.

The store has no set hours, Dee said. “Most people just stop in and take a look. We have some stuff made up, but the biggest part of our business is custom work. If someone needs something unique or different, we are always open to trying something new.”

The couple can also do repair work, both on leather tack and rawhide, and kangaroo leather items.

Most of their business is through word-of-mouth or through their website: http://www.RawhideAndRoo.com. “Depending on our work schedule and what we have made, we might attend some horse sales or rodeos,” she explained. “If someone has something they would like us to attend, they can give us a call. Depending on the distance, we may be interested in coming.”

Some of the most sought after rawhide and leather tack and jewelry is produced on the Colorado Plains near the small town of Fleming, Colo.

Dee Jensen became interested in working with rawhide after deciding to try to make a headstall she couldn’t afford. “A gentleman who worked with my husband made these items, and had a book that showed how to do it. He copied some of the pages so I could practice the knots,” she explained.

Afterward, Dee said she spent many cold winter evenings practicing and perfecting her knot tying, and making the headstall. “When I actually finished it, someone wanted to buy it, so I made another, and someone wanted to buy it. That was how our business got started.”

Today, Dee, and husband, Les, operate Rawhide N ‘Roo, which is a rawhide braiding and leather tack business that mostly thrives on custom work. “Customization is our biggest selling point,” Dee explained. “People see something and will want us to make it bigger or smaller. Sometimes, they will see two different headstalls, and want us to make a custom headstall combining parts of the two together. Our customers’ ideas are what has made our business so popular.”

The business has become very successful over the years, which Dee and Les attribute to their faith in God. “God has totally blessed this business and given us the gifts to do what we do,” she said.

Dee makes tack items and jewelry, braiding both rawhide and kangaroo leather. “The kangaroo leather is used to make romal reins, hobbles and headstalls. Kangaroo is actually supposed to be stronger than cowhide,” she explained. “What I like about it is that it can be dyed whatever color I need, so I can offer our customers a variety of colors.”

“Because of the color variation of it, I like to use it in some of my knots to give them a color variation,” she continued. “The kangaroo leather is very easy to work with because it doesn’t have to be wet to work with it. It is a softer leather, and can be used to give the items I make more variation.”

The rawhide is more challenging, Dee admits. “A lot of the working with rawhide is done in stages. Rawhide has to be allowed to dry. As it dries, it shrinks and tightens down. When you are working with it, you have to make sure your knots are right.”

Out of the many items they make, Dee said, bosals are the most complicated. “There are a lot of bosals on the market, but a lot of them don’t have a rawhide core. The rawhide core is made of twisted rawhide, which Les does. It was a learning process to make these, because you have to braid over the core, and braid over the nose button, which were the hardest things for me to learn how to do.”

Although she has never formally studied knot tying, Dee said she purchased a copy of the book she originally learned from along with some DVDs. Occasionally, she has called people who teach braiding, if she hits a particular rough spot. “Everyone has always been very gracious about helping me when I need it. My braiding is still a work in progress,” she said.

Some of the items Les and Dee specialize in are leather romal reins and rawhide braided romal reins, headstalls made from leather or rawhide, kangaroo leather hobbles, rawhide and leather bosals with rawhide cores, side pulls, loping bridles, spur straps, cavessons, breast collars, and bracelets, barrettes and shooflies. “We also carry high quality bits and spurs, but we don’t make those,” she said.

“Shooflies are probably the most unique item we make,” she explained. “They are a personal memento we make for horse owners who have lost their horse. It takes some advance planning to make one, because they are made from the hair on the horse’s tail. They are very popular, and we make a lot of them. We also added a little medal name tag with the horse’s name engraved on it, to give it a personalized feel.”

Originally, shooflies were used with work horses to keep the flies away. A lot of people also use them on their cinches to keep flies away from their performance horses. “Someone asked us to make one after they had lost their horse, and the idea evolved from there,” she said.

The couple has also made a lot of awards for clubs and groups, such as breast collars, headstalls, and spur straps. “Les can either stamp on the leather, or we can have custom buckles made,” she said.

Dee also makes a line of rawhide barrettes and bracelets, which she designs herself. “I have never seen anyone else who makes rawhide barrettes,” she said. “After an article about the ones I make appeared in Western Horseman, I sold quite a few and had a lot of repeat customers. The rawhide bracelets are a little pricier because they are more time-consuming for me to make. But, I can customize them by making them bigger or smaller so they fit the wrist correctly. If someone wants something particular on them, all they have to do is ask, and I will try it if it is possible.”

Dee can also make the barrettes, with interchangeable conchos, for a different “look.” She has cochos with everything from cutters, ropers, and barrel racers, to crosses, cactus, steer heads, and hearts. Customers can purchase one barrette and several conchos.

New this year are rawhide hondas, and leather fly swatters. “The fly swatters are just adorable,” Dee said. “They have a leather swatter on the end of a wooden dowel handle. Les can either make them plain, or put a brand or leather initials on them.” Dee said the item has proved to already be a popular Christmas gift. The fly swatter is $15 for plain, or $20 for ones with the brand or initials on them.

The store has no set hours, Dee said. “Most people just stop in and take a look. We have some stuff made up, but the biggest part of our business is custom work. If someone needs something unique or different, we are always open to trying something new.”

The couple can also do repair work, both on leather tack and rawhide, and kangaroo leather items.

Most of their business is through word-of-mouth or through their website: http://www.RawhideAndRoo.com. “Depending on our work schedule and what we have made, we might attend some horse sales or rodeos,” she explained. “If someone has something they would like us to attend, they can give us a call. Depending on the distance, we may be interested in coming.”

Some of the most sought after rawhide and leather tack and jewelry is produced on the Colorado Plains near the small town of Fleming, Colo.

Dee Jensen became interested in working with rawhide after deciding to try to make a headstall she couldn’t afford. “A gentleman who worked with my husband made these items, and had a book that showed how to do it. He copied some of the pages so I could practice the knots,” she explained.

Afterward, Dee said she spent many cold winter evenings practicing and perfecting her knot tying, and making the headstall. “When I actually finished it, someone wanted to buy it, so I made another, and someone wanted to buy it. That was how our business got started.”

Today, Dee, and husband, Les, operate Rawhide N ‘Roo, which is a rawhide braiding and leather tack business that mostly thrives on custom work. “Customization is our biggest selling point,” Dee explained. “People see something and will want us to make it bigger or smaller. Sometimes, they will see two different headstalls, and want us to make a custom headstall combining parts of the two together. Our customers’ ideas are what has made our business so popular.”

The business has become very successful over the years, which Dee and Les attribute to their faith in God. “God has totally blessed this business and given us the gifts to do what we do,” she said.

Dee makes tack items and jewelry, braiding both rawhide and kangaroo leather. “The kangaroo leather is used to make romal reins, hobbles and headstalls. Kangaroo is actually supposed to be stronger than cowhide,” she explained. “What I like about it is that it can be dyed whatever color I need, so I can offer our customers a variety of colors.”

“Because of the color variation of it, I like to use it in some of my knots to give them a color variation,” she continued. “The kangaroo leather is very easy to work with because it doesn’t have to be wet to work with it. It is a softer leather, and can be used to give the items I make more variation.”

The rawhide is more challenging, Dee admits. “A lot of the working with rawhide is done in stages. Rawhide has to be allowed to dry. As it dries, it shrinks and tightens down. When you are working with it, you have to make sure your knots are right.”

Out of the many items they make, Dee said, bosals are the most complicated. “There are a lot of bosals on the market, but a lot of them don’t have a rawhide core. The rawhide core is made of twisted rawhide, which Les does. It was a learning process to make these, because you have to braid over the core, and braid over the nose button, which were the hardest things for me to learn how to do.”

Although she has never formally studied knot tying, Dee said she purchased a copy of the book she originally learned from along with some DVDs. Occasionally, she has called people who teach braiding, if she hits a particular rough spot. “Everyone has always been very gracious about helping me when I need it. My braiding is still a work in progress,” she said.

Some of the items Les and Dee specialize in are leather romal reins and rawhide braided romal reins, headstalls made from leather or rawhide, kangaroo leather hobbles, rawhide and leather bosals with rawhide cores, side pulls, loping bridles, spur straps, cavessons, breast collars, and bracelets, barrettes and shooflies. “We also carry high quality bits and spurs, but we don’t make those,” she said.

“Shooflies are probably the most unique item we make,” she explained. “They are a personal memento we make for horse owners who have lost their horse. It takes some advance planning to make one, because they are made from the hair on the horse’s tail. They are very popular, and we make a lot of them. We also added a little medal name tag with the horse’s name engraved on it, to give it a personalized feel.”

Originally, shooflies were used with work horses to keep the flies away. A lot of people also use them on their cinches to keep flies away from their performance horses. “Someone asked us to make one after they had lost their horse, and the idea evolved from there,” she said.

The couple has also made a lot of awards for clubs and groups, such as breast collars, headstalls, and spur straps. “Les can either stamp on the leather, or we can have custom buckles made,” she said.

Dee also makes a line of rawhide barrettes and bracelets, which she designs herself. “I have never seen anyone else who makes rawhide barrettes,” she said. “After an article about the ones I make appeared in Western Horseman, I sold quite a few and had a lot of repeat customers. The rawhide bracelets are a little pricier because they are more time-consuming for me to make. But, I can customize them by making them bigger or smaller so they fit the wrist correctly. If someone wants something particular on them, all they have to do is ask, and I will try it if it is possible.”

Dee can also make the barrettes, with interchangeable conchos, for a different “look.” She has cochos with everything from cutters, ropers, and barrel racers, to crosses, cactus, steer heads, and hearts. Customers can purchase one barrette and several conchos.

New this year are rawhide hondas, and leather fly swatters. “The fly swatters are just adorable,” Dee said. “They have a leather swatter on the end of a wooden dowel handle. Les can either make them plain, or put a brand or leather initials on them.” Dee said the item has proved to already be a popular Christmas gift. The fly swatter is $15 for plain, or $20 for ones with the brand or initials on them.

The store has no set hours, Dee said. “Most people just stop in and take a look. We have some stuff made up, but the biggest part of our business is custom work. If someone needs something unique or different, we are always open to trying something new.”

The couple can also do repair work, both on leather tack and rawhide, and kangaroo leather items.

Most of their business is through word-of-mouth or through their website: http://www.RawhideAndRoo.com. “Depending on our work schedule and what we have made, we might attend some horse sales or rodeos,” she explained. “If someone has something they would like us to attend, they can give us a call. Depending on the distance, we may be interested in coming.”

Some of the most sought after rawhide and leather tack and jewelry is produced on the Colorado Plains near the small town of Fleming, Colo.

Dee Jensen became interested in working with rawhide after deciding to try to make a headstall she couldn’t afford. “A gentleman who worked with my husband made these items, and had a book that showed how to do it. He copied some of the pages so I could practice the knots,” she explained.

Afterward, Dee said she spent many cold winter evenings practicing and perfecting her knot tying, and making the headstall. “When I actually finished it, someone wanted to buy it, so I made another, and someone wanted to buy it. That was how our business got started.”

Today, Dee, and husband, Les, operate Rawhide N ‘Roo, which is a rawhide braiding and leather tack business that mostly thrives on custom work. “Customization is our biggest selling point,” Dee explained. “People see something and will want us to make it bigger or smaller. Sometimes, they will see two different headstalls, and want us to make a custom headstall combining parts of the two together. Our customers’ ideas are what has made our business so popular.”

The business has become very successful over the years, which Dee and Les attribute to their faith in God. “God has totally blessed this business and given us the gifts to do what we do,” she said.

Dee makes tack items and jewelry, braiding both rawhide and kangaroo leather. “The kangaroo leather is used to make romal reins, hobbles and headstalls. Kangaroo is actually supposed to be stronger than cowhide,” she explained. “What I like about it is that it can be dyed whatever color I need, so I can offer our customers a variety of colors.”

“Because of the color variation of it, I like to use it in some of my knots to give them a color variation,” she continued. “The kangaroo leather is very easy to work with because it doesn’t have to be wet to work with it. It is a softer leather, and can be used to give the items I make more variation.”

The rawhide is more challenging, Dee admits. “A lot of the working with rawhide is done in stages. Rawhide has to be allowed to dry. As it dries, it shrinks and tightens down. When you are working with it, you have to make sure your knots are right.”

Out of the many items they make, Dee said, bosals are the most complicated. “There are a lot of bosals on the market, but a lot of them don’t have a rawhide core. The rawhide core is made of twisted rawhide, which Les does. It was a learning process to make these, because you have to braid over the core, and braid over the nose button, which were the hardest things for me to learn how to do.”

Although she has never formally studied knot tying, Dee said she purchased a copy of the book she originally learned from along with some DVDs. Occasionally, she has called people who teach braiding, if she hits a particular rough spot. “Everyone has always been very gracious about helping me when I need it. My braiding is still a work in progress,” she said.

Some of the items Les and Dee specialize in are leather romal reins and rawhide braided romal reins, headstalls made from leather or rawhide, kangaroo leather hobbles, rawhide and leather bosals with rawhide cores, side pulls, loping bridles, spur straps, cavessons, breast collars, and bracelets, barrettes and shooflies. “We also carry high quality bits and spurs, but we don’t make those,” she said.

“Shooflies are probably the most unique item we make,” she explained. “They are a personal memento we make for horse owners who have lost their horse. It takes some advance planning to make one, because they are made from the hair on the horse’s tail. They are very popular, and we make a lot of them. We also added a little medal name tag with the horse’s name engraved on it, to give it a personalized feel.”

Originally, shooflies were used with work horses to keep the flies away. A lot of people also use them on their cinches to keep flies away from their performance horses. “Someone asked us to make one after they had lost their horse, and the idea evolved from there,” she said.

The couple has also made a lot of awards for clubs and groups, such as breast collars, headstalls, and spur straps. “Les can either stamp on the leather, or we can have custom buckles made,” she said.

Dee also makes a line of rawhide barrettes and bracelets, which she designs herself. “I have never seen anyone else who makes rawhide barrettes,” she said. “After an article about the ones I make appeared in Western Horseman, I sold quite a few and had a lot of repeat customers. The rawhide bracelets are a little pricier because they are more time-consuming for me to make. But, I can customize them by making them bigger or smaller so they fit the wrist correctly. If someone wants something particular on them, all they have to do is ask, and I will try it if it is possible.”

Dee can also make the barrettes, with interchangeable conchos, for a different “look.” She has cochos with everything from cutters, ropers, and barrel racers, to crosses, cactus, steer heads, and hearts. Customers can purchase one barrette and several conchos.

New this year are rawhide hondas, and leather fly swatters. “The fly swatters are just adorable,” Dee said. “They have a leather swatter on the end of a wooden dowel handle. Les can either make them plain, or put a brand or leather initials on them.” Dee said the item has proved to already be a popular Christmas gift. The fly swatter is $15 for plain, or $20 for ones with the brand or initials on them.

The store has no set hours, Dee said. “Most people just stop in and take a look. We have some stuff made up, but the biggest part of our business is custom work. If someone needs something unique or different, we are always open to trying something new.”

The couple can also do repair work, both on leather tack and rawhide, and kangaroo leather items.

Most of their business is through word-of-mouth or through their website: http://www.RawhideAndRoo.com. “Depending on our work schedule and what we have made, we might attend some horse sales or rodeos,” she explained. “If someone has something they would like us to attend, they can give us a call. Depending on the distance, we may be interested in coming.”