Road Trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico | TheFencePost.com

Road Trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico

A short side trip from Santa Fe is the reputably, miraculous chapel Santuario de Chimay. During Holy Week more than 50,000 make the pilgrimage to Chimayo, many of them walking long distances and carrying heavy wooden crosses.

Our annual “October snow” has come and gone and, if you are considering one last road trip before winter sets in for good, you might look an easy 400 miles from Denver down I-25 to Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This is a great time of the year to visit Santa Fe. The tourists have mostly gone and the city is returning to its normal pace. As far as weather goes, Santa Fe is in the semi-arid climate zone with cool winters, and hot summers. Average high temperature in November is a comfortable 52 degrees Fahrenheit. By Colorado standards, Santa Fe gets almost no snow and most of the 26-inches of annual snow that it gets falls between December and March.

Much more snow falls in the mountains above town, which is great news for the ski area. Yes, you can ski in Santa Fe. Ski Santa Fe is located in the beautiful Sangre de Cristo Mountains just 16 miles from the center of historic Santa Fe, New Mexico. It has a base area elevation of 10,350-feet and tops out at over 12,000-feet, which makes Ski Santa Fe among the highest ski areas in the continental United States.

Santa Fe is a city proud of its peculiarities and its blend of tradition and modernity. It is a cultural mix of Anglo, Native American, and Hispanic, which have blended to produce a unique life style. The city has a long history of occupation. Pueblo Indians lived on the land that is now Santa Fe around 1050 and, except for a brief period, Santa Fe has been continuously occupied ever since. New Mexico became the 47th state in 1912 with Santa Fe as its capital.

One of the things that you notice, almost immediately, about Santa Fe is that all of the buildings have the same construction style. That is not by chance. In 1957 an ordinance was passed that required all new and rebuilt buildings, especially those in designated historic districts, to have a Spanish Territorial or Pueblo style of architecture, with flat roofs and other features suggestive of the area’s traditional adobe construction.

Pueblo style architecture seeks to imitate the appearance of traditional adobe construction, though more modern materials such as brick or concrete are often substituted. If adobe is not used, rounded corners, irregular parapets, and thick, battered walls are used to simulate it. Walls are usually stuccoed and painted in earth tones. Multistory buildings usually employ stepped floors similar to those seen at Taos Pueblo. Roofs are always flat and a common feature is the use of projecting wooden roof beams (vigas), which are usually decorative and serve no structural purpose in newer buildings.

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Historic Santa Fe is centered around The Plaza. Within walking distance of The Plaza you will find the Palace of the Governors, the State Capitol, Loretto Chapel, Saint Francis Cathedral, numerous world-class museums including the Georgia O’Keefe Museum, an incredible array of restaurants, and enough shopping to max out any color of card.

Street parking is available, but not abundant during peak tourist times. The parking places, like the narrow streets, are not suited for nine-passenger SUV’s or long bed ‘duelies’. There is a city parking lot for trucks located on East Alemeda near Paseo de Peralta. It is centrally located between The Plaza and Canyon Road.

A walk up Canyon Road should be high on your ‘to do’ list. Canyon Road is an art district, with over a hundred art galleries and studios exhibiting Native American art and antiquities, traditional and modern Hispanic art, regional contemporary art, international folk art and international contemporary art. Not only is Canyon Road lined with galleries, but if you venture into the residential neighborhoods and alley-ways a block off Canyon Road, you will find some of the historical houses of Santa Fe that have been restored.

The Acequia Madre (Mother Ditch) also runs through the residential areas here. It is the third oldest irrigation ditch in the United States and some feel that the ditch may be older than the city of Santa Fe. Ditch members have the oldest water rights in the state, except for tribes and pueblos. Their rights to the water are legally paramount, even over cities. In its first three centuries, the acequia watered fields of vegetables and large orchards. Now, surrounded by houses and businesses, the ditch is used to water fruit trees, gardens, flowers and yards.

In 1912, Santa Fe began to receive an influx of artists drawn by the wonderful light in the desert and the relaxed atmosphere of the area and that trend has continued to this day. There are galleries and artist studios everywhere in Santa Fe and their wares range from outrageously chic and expensive to offbeat and moderately priced. They all are very friendly and welcome browsers.

Santa Fe is a wonderful city to visit and, if you can not make it this year, it is not too early to start planning for an extended trip next year.

Our annual “October snow” has come and gone and, if you are considering one last road trip before winter sets in for good, you might look an easy 400 miles from Denver down I-25 to Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This is a great time of the year to visit Santa Fe. The tourists have mostly gone and the city is returning to its normal pace. As far as weather goes, Santa Fe is in the semi-arid climate zone with cool winters, and hot summers. Average high temperature in November is a comfortable 52 degrees Fahrenheit. By Colorado standards, Santa Fe gets almost no snow and most of the 26-inches of annual snow that it gets falls between December and March.

Much more snow falls in the mountains above town, which is great news for the ski area. Yes, you can ski in Santa Fe. Ski Santa Fe is located in the beautiful Sangre de Cristo Mountains just 16 miles from the center of historic Santa Fe, New Mexico. It has a base area elevation of 10,350-feet and tops out at over 12,000-feet, which makes Ski Santa Fe among the highest ski areas in the continental United States.

Santa Fe is a city proud of its peculiarities and its blend of tradition and modernity. It is a cultural mix of Anglo, Native American, and Hispanic, which have blended to produce a unique life style. The city has a long history of occupation. Pueblo Indians lived on the land that is now Santa Fe around 1050 and, except for a brief period, Santa Fe has been continuously occupied ever since. New Mexico became the 47th state in 1912 with Santa Fe as its capital.

One of the things that you notice, almost immediately, about Santa Fe is that all of the buildings have the same construction style. That is not by chance. In 1957 an ordinance was passed that required all new and rebuilt buildings, especially those in designated historic districts, to have a Spanish Territorial or Pueblo style of architecture, with flat roofs and other features suggestive of the area’s traditional adobe construction.

Pueblo style architecture seeks to imitate the appearance of traditional adobe construction, though more modern materials such as brick or concrete are often substituted. If adobe is not used, rounded corners, irregular parapets, and thick, battered walls are used to simulate it. Walls are usually stuccoed and painted in earth tones. Multistory buildings usually employ stepped floors similar to those seen at Taos Pueblo. Roofs are always flat and a common feature is the use of projecting wooden roof beams (vigas), which are usually decorative and serve no structural purpose in newer buildings.

Historic Santa Fe is centered around The Plaza. Within walking distance of The Plaza you will find the Palace of the Governors, the State Capitol, Loretto Chapel, Saint Francis Cathedral, numerous world-class museums including the Georgia O’Keefe Museum, an incredible array of restaurants, and enough shopping to max out any color of card.

Street parking is available, but not abundant during peak tourist times. The parking places, like the narrow streets, are not suited for nine-passenger SUV’s or long bed ‘duelies’. There is a city parking lot for trucks located on East Alemeda near Paseo de Peralta. It is centrally located between The Plaza and Canyon Road.

A walk up Canyon Road should be high on your ‘to do’ list. Canyon Road is an art district, with over a hundred art galleries and studios exhibiting Native American art and antiquities, traditional and modern Hispanic art, regional contemporary art, international folk art and international contemporary art. Not only is Canyon Road lined with galleries, but if you venture into the residential neighborhoods and alley-ways a block off Canyon Road, you will find some of the historical houses of Santa Fe that have been restored.

The Acequia Madre (Mother Ditch) also runs through the residential areas here. It is the third oldest irrigation ditch in the United States and some feel that the ditch may be older than the city of Santa Fe. Ditch members have the oldest water rights in the state, except for tribes and pueblos. Their rights to the water are legally paramount, even over cities. In its first three centuries, the acequia watered fields of vegetables and large orchards. Now, surrounded by houses and businesses, the ditch is used to water fruit trees, gardens, flowers and yards.

In 1912, Santa Fe began to receive an influx of artists drawn by the wonderful light in the desert and the relaxed atmosphere of the area and that trend has continued to this day. There are galleries and artist studios everywhere in Santa Fe and their wares range from outrageously chic and expensive to offbeat and moderately priced. They all are very friendly and welcome browsers.

Santa Fe is a wonderful city to visit and, if you can not make it this year, it is not too early to start planning for an extended trip next year.

Our annual “October snow” has come and gone and, if you are considering one last road trip before winter sets in for good, you might look an easy 400 miles from Denver down I-25 to Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This is a great time of the year to visit Santa Fe. The tourists have mostly gone and the city is returning to its normal pace. As far as weather goes, Santa Fe is in the semi-arid climate zone with cool winters, and hot summers. Average high temperature in November is a comfortable 52 degrees Fahrenheit. By Colorado standards, Santa Fe gets almost no snow and most of the 26-inches of annual snow that it gets falls between December and March.

Much more snow falls in the mountains above town, which is great news for the ski area. Yes, you can ski in Santa Fe. Ski Santa Fe is located in the beautiful Sangre de Cristo Mountains just 16 miles from the center of historic Santa Fe, New Mexico. It has a base area elevation of 10,350-feet and tops out at over 12,000-feet, which makes Ski Santa Fe among the highest ski areas in the continental United States.

Santa Fe is a city proud of its peculiarities and its blend of tradition and modernity. It is a cultural mix of Anglo, Native American, and Hispanic, which have blended to produce a unique life style. The city has a long history of occupation. Pueblo Indians lived on the land that is now Santa Fe around 1050 and, except for a brief period, Santa Fe has been continuously occupied ever since. New Mexico became the 47th state in 1912 with Santa Fe as its capital.

One of the things that you notice, almost immediately, about Santa Fe is that all of the buildings have the same construction style. That is not by chance. In 1957 an ordinance was passed that required all new and rebuilt buildings, especially those in designated historic districts, to have a Spanish Territorial or Pueblo style of architecture, with flat roofs and other features suggestive of the area’s traditional adobe construction.

Pueblo style architecture seeks to imitate the appearance of traditional adobe construction, though more modern materials such as brick or concrete are often substituted. If adobe is not used, rounded corners, irregular parapets, and thick, battered walls are used to simulate it. Walls are usually stuccoed and painted in earth tones. Multistory buildings usually employ stepped floors similar to those seen at Taos Pueblo. Roofs are always flat and a common feature is the use of projecting wooden roof beams (vigas), which are usually decorative and serve no structural purpose in newer buildings.

Historic Santa Fe is centered around The Plaza. Within walking distance of The Plaza you will find the Palace of the Governors, the State Capitol, Loretto Chapel, Saint Francis Cathedral, numerous world-class museums including the Georgia O’Keefe Museum, an incredible array of restaurants, and enough shopping to max out any color of card.

Street parking is available, but not abundant during peak tourist times. The parking places, like the narrow streets, are not suited for nine-passenger SUV’s or long bed ‘duelies’. There is a city parking lot for trucks located on East Alemeda near Paseo de Peralta. It is centrally located between The Plaza and Canyon Road.

A walk up Canyon Road should be high on your ‘to do’ list. Canyon Road is an art district, with over a hundred art galleries and studios exhibiting Native American art and antiquities, traditional and modern Hispanic art, regional contemporary art, international folk art and international contemporary art. Not only is Canyon Road lined with galleries, but if you venture into the residential neighborhoods and alley-ways a block off Canyon Road, you will find some of the historical houses of Santa Fe that have been restored.

The Acequia Madre (Mother Ditch) also runs through the residential areas here. It is the third oldest irrigation ditch in the United States and some feel that the ditch may be older than the city of Santa Fe. Ditch members have the oldest water rights in the state, except for tribes and pueblos. Their rights to the water are legally paramount, even over cities. In its first three centuries, the acequia watered fields of vegetables and large orchards. Now, surrounded by houses and businesses, the ditch is used to water fruit trees, gardens, flowers and yards.

In 1912, Santa Fe began to receive an influx of artists drawn by the wonderful light in the desert and the relaxed atmosphere of the area and that trend has continued to this day. There are galleries and artist studios everywhere in Santa Fe and their wares range from outrageously chic and expensive to offbeat and moderately priced. They all are very friendly and welcome browsers.

Santa Fe is a wonderful city to visit and, if you can not make it this year, it is not too early to start planning for an extended trip next year.