Rocky Mountain Obituaries 1-17-11 | TheFencePost.com

Rocky Mountain Obituaries 1-17-11

Edward Blaine Thomas, 84, of Idaho Springs, Colo., passed away December 17, 2010 at Collier Hospice in Lakewood, Colo.

He was born February 22, 1926, to Blaine and Catherine Powers Thomas in Littleton, Colo. Blaine grew up on a farm in the Littleton, Colo., area, when the total population was about 3,500. Blaine met Rose Dransfeldt while attending school in Littleton, Colo. They went to school together and both graduated from Littleton High School in 1943.

Blaine worked at a local service station and for a cattle trucking company until his induction into the Army in 1944. He served in World War II and was stationed in Korea. He completed his boot camp training at Camp Crowder in Missouri. Due to health issues he missed being sent to fight in the Battle of the Bulge. He was then deployed to the South Pacific where he spent his time in Korea disarming the Japanese and working with the Korean people. He was honorably discharged in 1946.

Blaine and Rose started dating after his return home from the war. They were married September 5, 1948. They built their first home in Englewood, Colo., and lived there for 9-1/2 years. They have three children, Stephen Blaine, Linda Rose, and Lorraine Margaret, all were born while they lived in Englewood, Colo.

Between 1946 and 1953 Blaine worked for the Harry H. Post Paper Company, Socony Vacuum Oil Company and Denver Transfer and Cartage. On February 1, 1953, Blaine and Rose entered into a trucking business partnership with Kenneth Trenberth of Idaho Springs, Colo. The business was known as Clear Creek County. In May 1954, they bough Kenneth out and in 1957 the Budweiser Distributorship was added to the freight hauling business.

In 1958, the family moved to Idaho Springs, Colo. They bought the Vorenberg Chicken Farm and combined their business facility and home on the two block area. The chicken farm proved to be a great place for the Thomas children to grow up, as they had lots of room to play and had a variety of animals to enjoy.

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In 1960, Blaine and Rose sold the freight business to Denver Climax Trucking and concentrated solely on the distributing of different brands of beer and pop to eight mountain counties. Budweiser Beer became the main brand of beer that they distributed. As the business grew the chicken houses were converted into warehouses.

Blaine was actively involved in the running of Clear Creek Transportation. He drove beer truck and delivered beer along side of his employees. When he started driving truck in the mountains, Berthoud Pass wasn’t paved. His was one of the first trucks that traveled up Highway 6 after it was completed. He drove the two lane mountain roads long before the Eisenhower Tunnel or any of Interstate 70 was completed.

During the years he was in business, he employed a lot of young people in Idaho Springs, Colo. He loved having them work for him. He taught several of them how to drive truck and instilled in them a strong work ethic.

In 1976, the Budweiser Distributorship was sold to Tom Geroge. Blaine and Rose retained the Clear Creek Transportation name. Blaine and Rose were still in business at the time of his death. They are one of the oldest business owners in Idaho Springs, Colo. Blaine was proud of his family. He was extremely proud that his three children and their spouses are self-employed and successful business people.

In 1964, Blaine was horseback riding up Chicago Creek and was thrown off the horse. He landed on a rock and broke his hip. He was laid up for about nine months before he was able to go back to work. As a result of this accident, he had to have his hip replaced in 1976 and then had the other hip replaced in 1987. He also had Lymphedema which produced a leg ulcer that he and Rose fought for 45 years to keep it healed. This leg ulcer caused him considerable pain and contributed to his inactivity, which eventually crippled him in his later years.

Blaine was very active in the community. He was an Idaho Springs City Councilman for two years. He served on the school board for eight years. Blaine belonged to the Idaho Springs Fire Department for 20 years, serving as Captain for several years. He also served on the Clear Creek Metropolitan Recreation District.

He is survived by his loving wife, Rose, of 62 years; son Stephen (Ali); daughters Linda (Stu) Arnold and Lorraine (Lonnie) Kawcak; eight grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; sister-in-law Martha Wilder; and several nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, brothers John Thomas and Bob Thomas and sister Margaret Davis.

Burial was at Mount Olive Cemetery in Wheat Ridge, Colo.

Edward Blaine Thomas, 84, of Idaho Springs, Colo., passed away December 17, 2010 at Collier Hospice in Lakewood, Colo.

He was born February 22, 1926, to Blaine and Catherine Powers Thomas in Littleton, Colo. Blaine grew up on a farm in the Littleton, Colo., area, when the total population was about 3,500. Blaine met Rose Dransfeldt while attending school in Littleton, Colo. They went to school together and both graduated from Littleton High School in 1943.

Blaine worked at a local service station and for a cattle trucking company until his induction into the Army in 1944. He served in World War II and was stationed in Korea. He completed his boot camp training at Camp Crowder in Missouri. Due to health issues he missed being sent to fight in the Battle of the Bulge. He was then deployed to the South Pacific where he spent his time in Korea disarming the Japanese and working with the Korean people. He was honorably discharged in 1946.

Blaine and Rose started dating after his return home from the war. They were married September 5, 1948. They built their first home in Englewood, Colo., and lived there for 9-1/2 years. They have three children, Stephen Blaine, Linda Rose, and Lorraine Margaret, all were born while they lived in Englewood, Colo.

Between 1946 and 1953 Blaine worked for the Harry H. Post Paper Company, Socony Vacuum Oil Company and Denver Transfer and Cartage. On February 1, 1953, Blaine and Rose entered into a trucking business partnership with Kenneth Trenberth of Idaho Springs, Colo. The business was known as Clear Creek County. In May 1954, they bough Kenneth out and in 1957 the Budweiser Distributorship was added to the freight hauling business.

In 1958, the family moved to Idaho Springs, Colo. They bought the Vorenberg Chicken Farm and combined their business facility and home on the two block area. The chicken farm proved to be a great place for the Thomas children to grow up, as they had lots of room to play and had a variety of animals to enjoy.

In 1960, Blaine and Rose sold the freight business to Denver Climax Trucking and concentrated solely on the distributing of different brands of beer and pop to eight mountain counties. Budweiser Beer became the main brand of beer that they distributed. As the business grew the chicken houses were converted into warehouses.

Blaine was actively involved in the running of Clear Creek Transportation. He drove beer truck and delivered beer along side of his employees. When he started driving truck in the mountains, Berthoud Pass wasn’t paved. His was one of the first trucks that traveled up Highway 6 after it was completed. He drove the two lane mountain roads long before the Eisenhower Tunnel or any of Interstate 70 was completed.

During the years he was in business, he employed a lot of young people in Idaho Springs, Colo. He loved having them work for him. He taught several of them how to drive truck and instilled in them a strong work ethic.

In 1976, the Budweiser Distributorship was sold to Tom Geroge. Blaine and Rose retained the Clear Creek Transportation name. Blaine and Rose were still in business at the time of his death. They are one of the oldest business owners in Idaho Springs, Colo. Blaine was proud of his family. He was extremely proud that his three children and their spouses are self-employed and successful business people.

In 1964, Blaine was horseback riding up Chicago Creek and was thrown off the horse. He landed on a rock and broke his hip. He was laid up for about nine months before he was able to go back to work. As a result of this accident, he had to have his hip replaced in 1976 and then had the other hip replaced in 1987. He also had Lymphedema which produced a leg ulcer that he and Rose fought for 45 years to keep it healed. This leg ulcer caused him considerable pain and contributed to his inactivity, which eventually crippled him in his later years.

Blaine was very active in the community. He was an Idaho Springs City Councilman for two years. He served on the school board for eight years. Blaine belonged to the Idaho Springs Fire Department for 20 years, serving as Captain for several years. He also served on the Clear Creek Metropolitan Recreation District.

He is survived by his loving wife, Rose, of 62 years; son Stephen (Ali); daughters Linda (Stu) Arnold and Lorraine (Lonnie) Kawcak; eight grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; sister-in-law Martha Wilder; and several nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, brothers John Thomas and Bob Thomas and sister Margaret Davis.

Burial was at Mount Olive Cemetery in Wheat Ridge, Colo.

Edward Blaine Thomas, 84, of Idaho Springs, Colo., passed away December 17, 2010 at Collier Hospice in Lakewood, Colo.

He was born February 22, 1926, to Blaine and Catherine Powers Thomas in Littleton, Colo. Blaine grew up on a farm in the Littleton, Colo., area, when the total population was about 3,500. Blaine met Rose Dransfeldt while attending school in Littleton, Colo. They went to school together and both graduated from Littleton High School in 1943.

Blaine worked at a local service station and for a cattle trucking company until his induction into the Army in 1944. He served in World War II and was stationed in Korea. He completed his boot camp training at Camp Crowder in Missouri. Due to health issues he missed being sent to fight in the Battle of the Bulge. He was then deployed to the South Pacific where he spent his time in Korea disarming the Japanese and working with the Korean people. He was honorably discharged in 1946.

Blaine and Rose started dating after his return home from the war. They were married September 5, 1948. They built their first home in Englewood, Colo., and lived there for 9-1/2 years. They have three children, Stephen Blaine, Linda Rose, and Lorraine Margaret, all were born while they lived in Englewood, Colo.

Between 1946 and 1953 Blaine worked for the Harry H. Post Paper Company, Socony Vacuum Oil Company and Denver Transfer and Cartage. On February 1, 1953, Blaine and Rose entered into a trucking business partnership with Kenneth Trenberth of Idaho Springs, Colo. The business was known as Clear Creek County. In May 1954, they bough Kenneth out and in 1957 the Budweiser Distributorship was added to the freight hauling business.

In 1958, the family moved to Idaho Springs, Colo. They bought the Vorenberg Chicken Farm and combined their business facility and home on the two block area. The chicken farm proved to be a great place for the Thomas children to grow up, as they had lots of room to play and had a variety of animals to enjoy.

In 1960, Blaine and Rose sold the freight business to Denver Climax Trucking and concentrated solely on the distributing of different brands of beer and pop to eight mountain counties. Budweiser Beer became the main brand of beer that they distributed. As the business grew the chicken houses were converted into warehouses.

Blaine was actively involved in the running of Clear Creek Transportation. He drove beer truck and delivered beer along side of his employees. When he started driving truck in the mountains, Berthoud Pass wasn’t paved. His was one of the first trucks that traveled up Highway 6 after it was completed. He drove the two lane mountain roads long before the Eisenhower Tunnel or any of Interstate 70 was completed.

During the years he was in business, he employed a lot of young people in Idaho Springs, Colo. He loved having them work for him. He taught several of them how to drive truck and instilled in them a strong work ethic.

In 1976, the Budweiser Distributorship was sold to Tom Geroge. Blaine and Rose retained the Clear Creek Transportation name. Blaine and Rose were still in business at the time of his death. They are one of the oldest business owners in Idaho Springs, Colo. Blaine was proud of his family. He was extremely proud that his three children and their spouses are self-employed and successful business people.

In 1964, Blaine was horseback riding up Chicago Creek and was thrown off the horse. He landed on a rock and broke his hip. He was laid up for about nine months before he was able to go back to work. As a result of this accident, he had to have his hip replaced in 1976 and then had the other hip replaced in 1987. He also had Lymphedema which produced a leg ulcer that he and Rose fought for 45 years to keep it healed. This leg ulcer caused him considerable pain and contributed to his inactivity, which eventually crippled him in his later years.

Blaine was very active in the community. He was an Idaho Springs City Councilman for two years. He served on the school board for eight years. Blaine belonged to the Idaho Springs Fire Department for 20 years, serving as Captain for several years. He also served on the Clear Creek Metropolitan Recreation District.

He is survived by his loving wife, Rose, of 62 years; son Stephen (Ali); daughters Linda (Stu) Arnold and Lorraine (Lonnie) Kawcak; eight grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; sister-in-law Martha Wilder; and several nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, brothers John Thomas and Bob Thomas and sister Margaret Davis.

Burial was at Mount Olive Cemetery in Wheat Ridge, Colo.

Edward Blaine Thomas, 84, of Idaho Springs, Colo., passed away December 17, 2010 at Collier Hospice in Lakewood, Colo.

He was born February 22, 1926, to Blaine and Catherine Powers Thomas in Littleton, Colo. Blaine grew up on a farm in the Littleton, Colo., area, when the total population was about 3,500. Blaine met Rose Dransfeldt while attending school in Littleton, Colo. They went to school together and both graduated from Littleton High School in 1943.

Blaine worked at a local service station and for a cattle trucking company until his induction into the Army in 1944. He served in World War II and was stationed in Korea. He completed his boot camp training at Camp Crowder in Missouri. Due to health issues he missed being sent to fight in the Battle of the Bulge. He was then deployed to the South Pacific where he spent his time in Korea disarming the Japanese and working with the Korean people. He was honorably discharged in 1946.

Blaine and Rose started dating after his return home from the war. They were married September 5, 1948. They built their first home in Englewood, Colo., and lived there for 9-1/2 years. They have three children, Stephen Blaine, Linda Rose, and Lorraine Margaret, all were born while they lived in Englewood, Colo.

Between 1946 and 1953 Blaine worked for the Harry H. Post Paper Company, Socony Vacuum Oil Company and Denver Transfer and Cartage. On February 1, 1953, Blaine and Rose entered into a trucking business partnership with Kenneth Trenberth of Idaho Springs, Colo. The business was known as Clear Creek County. In May 1954, they bough Kenneth out and in 1957 the Budweiser Distributorship was added to the freight hauling business.

In 1958, the family moved to Idaho Springs, Colo. They bought the Vorenberg Chicken Farm and combined their business facility and home on the two block area. The chicken farm proved to be a great place for the Thomas children to grow up, as they had lots of room to play and had a variety of animals to enjoy.

In 1960, Blaine and Rose sold the freight business to Denver Climax Trucking and concentrated solely on the distributing of different brands of beer and pop to eight mountain counties. Budweiser Beer became the main brand of beer that they distributed. As the business grew the chicken houses were converted into warehouses.

Blaine was actively involved in the running of Clear Creek Transportation. He drove beer truck and delivered beer along side of his employees. When he started driving truck in the mountains, Berthoud Pass wasn’t paved. His was one of the first trucks that traveled up Highway 6 after it was completed. He drove the two lane mountain roads long before the Eisenhower Tunnel or any of Interstate 70 was completed.

During the years he was in business, he employed a lot of young people in Idaho Springs, Colo. He loved having them work for him. He taught several of them how to drive truck and instilled in them a strong work ethic.

In 1976, the Budweiser Distributorship was sold to Tom Geroge. Blaine and Rose retained the Clear Creek Transportation name. Blaine and Rose were still in business at the time of his death. They are one of the oldest business owners in Idaho Springs, Colo. Blaine was proud of his family. He was extremely proud that his three children and their spouses are self-employed and successful business people.

In 1964, Blaine was horseback riding up Chicago Creek and was thrown off the horse. He landed on a rock and broke his hip. He was laid up for about nine months before he was able to go back to work. As a result of this accident, he had to have his hip replaced in 1976 and then had the other hip replaced in 1987. He also had Lymphedema which produced a leg ulcer that he and Rose fought for 45 years to keep it healed. This leg ulcer caused him considerable pain and contributed to his inactivity, which eventually crippled him in his later years.

Blaine was very active in the community. He was an Idaho Springs City Councilman for two years. He served on the school board for eight years. Blaine belonged to the Idaho Springs Fire Department for 20 years, serving as Captain for several years. He also served on the Clear Creek Metropolitan Recreation District.

He is survived by his loving wife, Rose, of 62 years; son Stephen (Ali); daughters Linda (Stu) Arnold and Lorraine (Lonnie) Kawcak; eight grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; sister-in-law Martha Wilder; and several nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, brothers John Thomas and Bob Thomas and sister Margaret Davis.

Burial was at Mount Olive Cemetery in Wheat Ridge, Colo.

Edward Blaine Thomas, 84, of Idaho Springs, Colo., passed away December 17, 2010 at Collier Hospice in Lakewood, Colo.

He was born February 22, 1926, to Blaine and Catherine Powers Thomas in Littleton, Colo. Blaine grew up on a farm in the Littleton, Colo., area, when the total population was about 3,500. Blaine met Rose Dransfeldt while attending school in Littleton, Colo. They went to school together and both graduated from Littleton High School in 1943.

Blaine worked at a local service station and for a cattle trucking company until his induction into the Army in 1944. He served in World War II and was stationed in Korea. He completed his boot camp training at Camp Crowder in Missouri. Due to health issues he missed being sent to fight in the Battle of the Bulge. He was then deployed to the South Pacific where he spent his time in Korea disarming the Japanese and working with the Korean people. He was honorably discharged in 1946.

Blaine and Rose started dating after his return home from the war. They were married September 5, 1948. They built their first home in Englewood, Colo., and lived there for 9-1/2 years. They have three children, Stephen Blaine, Linda Rose, and Lorraine Margaret, all were born while they lived in Englewood, Colo.

Between 1946 and 1953 Blaine worked for the Harry H. Post Paper Company, Socony Vacuum Oil Company and Denver Transfer and Cartage. On February 1, 1953, Blaine and Rose entered into a trucking business partnership with Kenneth Trenberth of Idaho Springs, Colo. The business was known as Clear Creek County. In May 1954, they bough Kenneth out and in 1957 the Budweiser Distributorship was added to the freight hauling business.

In 1958, the family moved to Idaho Springs, Colo. They bought the Vorenberg Chicken Farm and combined their business facility and home on the two block area. The chicken farm proved to be a great place for the Thomas children to grow up, as they had lots of room to play and had a variety of animals to enjoy.

In 1960, Blaine and Rose sold the freight business to Denver Climax Trucking and concentrated solely on the distributing of different brands of beer and pop to eight mountain counties. Budweiser Beer became the main brand of beer that they distributed. As the business grew the chicken houses were converted into warehouses.

Blaine was actively involved in the running of Clear Creek Transportation. He drove beer truck and delivered beer along side of his employees. When he started driving truck in the mountains, Berthoud Pass wasn’t paved. His was one of the first trucks that traveled up Highway 6 after it was completed. He drove the two lane mountain roads long before the Eisenhower Tunnel or any of Interstate 70 was completed.

During the years he was in business, he employed a lot of young people in Idaho Springs, Colo. He loved having them work for him. He taught several of them how to drive truck and instilled in them a strong work ethic.

In 1976, the Budweiser Distributorship was sold to Tom Geroge. Blaine and Rose retained the Clear Creek Transportation name. Blaine and Rose were still in business at the time of his death. They are one of the oldest business owners in Idaho Springs, Colo. Blaine was proud of his family. He was extremely proud that his three children and their spouses are self-employed and successful business people.

In 1964, Blaine was horseback riding up Chicago Creek and was thrown off the horse. He landed on a rock and broke his hip. He was laid up for about nine months before he was able to go back to work. As a result of this accident, he had to have his hip replaced in 1976 and then had the other hip replaced in 1987. He also had Lymphedema which produced a leg ulcer that he and Rose fought for 45 years to keep it healed. This leg ulcer caused him considerable pain and contributed to his inactivity, which eventually crippled him in his later years.

Blaine was very active in the community. He was an Idaho Springs City Councilman for two years. He served on the school board for eight years. Blaine belonged to the Idaho Springs Fire Department for 20 years, serving as Captain for several years. He also served on the Clear Creek Metropolitan Recreation District.

He is survived by his loving wife, Rose, of 62 years; son Stephen (Ali); daughters Linda (Stu) Arnold and Lorraine (Lonnie) Kawcak; eight grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; sister-in-law Martha Wilder; and several nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, brothers John Thomas and Bob Thomas and sister Margaret Davis.

Burial was at Mount Olive Cemetery in Wheat Ridge, Colo.

Edward Blaine Thomas, 84, of Idaho Springs, Colo., passed away December 17, 2010 at Collier Hospice in Lakewood, Colo.

He was born February 22, 1926, to Blaine and Catherine Powers Thomas in Littleton, Colo. Blaine grew up on a farm in the Littleton, Colo., area, when the total population was about 3,500. Blaine met Rose Dransfeldt while attending school in Littleton, Colo. They went to school together and both graduated from Littleton High School in 1943.

Blaine worked at a local service station and for a cattle trucking company until his induction into the Army in 1944. He served in World War II and was stationed in Korea. He completed his boot camp training at Camp Crowder in Missouri. Due to health issues he missed being sent to fight in the Battle of the Bulge. He was then deployed to the South Pacific where he spent his time in Korea disarming the Japanese and working with the Korean people. He was honorably discharged in 1946.

Blaine and Rose started dating after his return home from the war. They were married September 5, 1948. They built their first home in Englewood, Colo., and lived there for 9-1/2 years. They have three children, Stephen Blaine, Linda Rose, and Lorraine Margaret, all were born while they lived in Englewood, Colo.

Between 1946 and 1953 Blaine worked for the Harry H. Post Paper Company, Socony Vacuum Oil Company and Denver Transfer and Cartage. On February 1, 1953, Blaine and Rose entered into a trucking business partnership with Kenneth Trenberth of Idaho Springs, Colo. The business was known as Clear Creek County. In May 1954, they bough Kenneth out and in 1957 the Budweiser Distributorship was added to the freight hauling business.

In 1958, the family moved to Idaho Springs, Colo. They bought the Vorenberg Chicken Farm and combined their business facility and home on the two block area. The chicken farm proved to be a great place for the Thomas children to grow up, as they had lots of room to play and had a variety of animals to enjoy.

In 1960, Blaine and Rose sold the freight business to Denver Climax Trucking and concentrated solely on the distributing of different brands of beer and pop to eight mountain counties. Budweiser Beer became the main brand of beer that they distributed. As the business grew the chicken houses were converted into warehouses.

Blaine was actively involved in the running of Clear Creek Transportation. He drove beer truck and delivered beer along side of his employees. When he started driving truck in the mountains, Berthoud Pass wasn’t paved. His was one of the first trucks that traveled up Highway 6 after it was completed. He drove the two lane mountain roads long before the Eisenhower Tunnel or any of Interstate 70 was completed.

During the years he was in business, he employed a lot of young people in Idaho Springs, Colo. He loved having them work for him. He taught several of them how to drive truck and instilled in them a strong work ethic.

In 1976, the Budweiser Distributorship was sold to Tom Geroge. Blaine and Rose retained the Clear Creek Transportation name. Blaine and Rose were still in business at the time of his death. They are one of the oldest business owners in Idaho Springs, Colo. Blaine was proud of his family. He was extremely proud that his three children and their spouses are self-employed and successful business people.

In 1964, Blaine was horseback riding up Chicago Creek and was thrown off the horse. He landed on a rock and broke his hip. He was laid up for about nine months before he was able to go back to work. As a result of this accident, he had to have his hip replaced in 1976 and then had the other hip replaced in 1987. He also had Lymphedema which produced a leg ulcer that he and Rose fought for 45 years to keep it healed. This leg ulcer caused him considerable pain and contributed to his inactivity, which eventually crippled him in his later years.

Blaine was very active in the community. He was an Idaho Springs City Councilman for two years. He served on the school board for eight years. Blaine belonged to the Idaho Springs Fire Department for 20 years, serving as Captain for several years. He also served on the Clear Creek Metropolitan Recreation District.

He is survived by his loving wife, Rose, of 62 years; son Stephen (Ali); daughters Linda (Stu) Arnold and Lorraine (Lonnie) Kawcak; eight grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; sister-in-law Martha Wilder; and several nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, brothers John Thomas and Bob Thomas and sister Margaret Davis.

Burial was at Mount Olive Cemetery in Wheat Ridge, Colo.