Rocky Mountain Obituaries 11-28-11 | TheFencePost.com

Rocky Mountain Obituaries 11-28-11

John Raymond (Ray) Enright, 85, of Silt, Colo., passed away November 13, 2011 at his home.

He was born May 3, 1926 in Elizabeth, N.J., to John H. and Marie (Gleason) Enright. He enlisted in the Army after high school graduation, but World War II was ending, and he served only one year before he was honorably discharged in 1945. Ray attended Seton Hall University and received a degree in Business Administration.

In 1951, he joined the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Narcotics as an agent assigned to the drug trafficing division. He worked on cases involving obstruction of justice, conspiracy, oranized crime and racketeering, fugitive search, drug thefts, and plant and warehouse security. He was supervisor of the “Special Squad,” a group of agents from the Bureau of Narcotics and the Bureau of Customs attached to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern Judicial District of New York. This group initiated conspiracy cases against organized crime figures engaged in the international narcotic traffic. Ray was involved in the investigative arm of the U.S. Attorney General’s prosecution of the attendees at the infamous Apalachin Summit Conference, otherwise known as an organized crime convention, as well as the prosecution of crime boss, Vito Genovese.

During the 1960s, Ray served as District Supervisor in Atlanta, Ga., which included all Bureau programs in Georgia, Alabama, Florida, South Carolina and Tennessee. He spent a six month period serving as a staff investigator on loan to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, also known as the McClellan Committee.

He served as Assistant Commissioner and coordinated investigations with other U.S. and foreign enforcement agencies with an emphasis on organized crime and racketeering groups.

As Assistant Director in the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, which replaced the Bureau of Narcotics, he was initially responsible for domestic criminal investigations, and later foreign investigations, Ray was responsible for briefing Congress, the Department of Justice, and White House officials, and was a liaison with other agencies on advisory functions, such as forensic laboratory programs to support law enforcement agencies, and measuring enforcement activities as a management tool.

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Ray became Director of the Office of Public Affairs, and Special Assistant for Enforcement in Washington D.C., in charge of Congressional relations, public information, and drug abuse prevention. He dealt with inquiries from Congress and public agencies, and the news media.

In 1974, Ray became the Regional Director of the Drug Enforcement Administration, headquartered in Denver, Colo. His region included offices in Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

He was named Director of the Colorado Bureau of Investigation by Governor Richard Lamm in 1977. He served in this capacity until 1984.

In 1987, Ray was named to the Colorado State Board of Parole by Governor Roy Romer. He served in that position until his retirement.

Ray and his wife Janie (Green) moved to Silt, Colo., in 1994, where he lived until his death.

He was a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the American Society for Industrial Security, recipient of the Drug Enforcement Administration is Special Equal Employment Opportunity Award for outstanding commitment and contributions to Equal Opportunity Opportunity, and awarded the Gold Cross of Merit from the Italian Government for enforcement achievements in cooperative efforts between the two countries, among other bureau and departmental awards.

Ray was actively involved in the Peruvian horse, both as a breeder and serving on the national board, and as president of the local club.

He was a beloved father, husband, and friend who will be greatly missed.

He is survived by his loving wife Janie; sons John, Matthew, Daniel, Paul, James, Ryan, and Scott; daughter Laurie Marlin; brother Robert; 17 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

He was preceded in death by his parents, former wife Marjorie; daughter Megan McMechen; and sister Arlene DiLeo.

Memorial services will be held at Littleton’s St. Francis Cabrini Catholic Parish, on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 at 1:30 p.m.

Cremation has taken place.

John Raymond (Ray) Enright, 85, of Silt, Colo., passed away November 13, 2011 at his home.

He was born May 3, 1926 in Elizabeth, N.J., to John H. and Marie (Gleason) Enright. He enlisted in the Army after high school graduation, but World War II was ending, and he served only one year before he was honorably discharged in 1945. Ray attended Seton Hall University and received a degree in Business Administration.

In 1951, he joined the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Narcotics as an agent assigned to the drug trafficing division. He worked on cases involving obstruction of justice, conspiracy, oranized crime and racketeering, fugitive search, drug thefts, and plant and warehouse security. He was supervisor of the “Special Squad,” a group of agents from the Bureau of Narcotics and the Bureau of Customs attached to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern Judicial District of New York. This group initiated conspiracy cases against organized crime figures engaged in the international narcotic traffic. Ray was involved in the investigative arm of the U.S. Attorney General’s prosecution of the attendees at the infamous Apalachin Summit Conference, otherwise known as an organized crime convention, as well as the prosecution of crime boss, Vito Genovese.

During the 1960s, Ray served as District Supervisor in Atlanta, Ga., which included all Bureau programs in Georgia, Alabama, Florida, South Carolina and Tennessee. He spent a six month period serving as a staff investigator on loan to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, also known as the McClellan Committee.

He served as Assistant Commissioner and coordinated investigations with other U.S. and foreign enforcement agencies with an emphasis on organized crime and racketeering groups.

As Assistant Director in the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, which replaced the Bureau of Narcotics, he was initially responsible for domestic criminal investigations, and later foreign investigations, Ray was responsible for briefing Congress, the Department of Justice, and White House officials, and was a liaison with other agencies on advisory functions, such as forensic laboratory programs to support law enforcement agencies, and measuring enforcement activities as a management tool.

Ray became Director of the Office of Public Affairs, and Special Assistant for Enforcement in Washington D.C., in charge of Congressional relations, public information, and drug abuse prevention. He dealt with inquiries from Congress and public agencies, and the news media.

In 1974, Ray became the Regional Director of the Drug Enforcement Administration, headquartered in Denver, Colo. His region included offices in Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

He was named Director of the Colorado Bureau of Investigation by Governor Richard Lamm in 1977. He served in this capacity until 1984.

In 1987, Ray was named to the Colorado State Board of Parole by Governor Roy Romer. He served in that position until his retirement.

Ray and his wife Janie (Green) moved to Silt, Colo., in 1994, where he lived until his death.

He was a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the American Society for Industrial Security, recipient of the Drug Enforcement Administration is Special Equal Employment Opportunity Award for outstanding commitment and contributions to Equal Opportunity Opportunity, and awarded the Gold Cross of Merit from the Italian Government for enforcement achievements in cooperative efforts between the two countries, among other bureau and departmental awards.

Ray was actively involved in the Peruvian horse, both as a breeder and serving on the national board, and as president of the local club.

He was a beloved father, husband, and friend who will be greatly missed.

He is survived by his loving wife Janie; sons John, Matthew, Daniel, Paul, James, Ryan, and Scott; daughter Laurie Marlin; brother Robert; 17 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

He was preceded in death by his parents, former wife Marjorie; daughter Megan McMechen; and sister Arlene DiLeo.

Memorial services will be held at Littleton’s St. Francis Cabrini Catholic Parish, on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 at 1:30 p.m.

Cremation has taken place.

John Raymond (Ray) Enright, 85, of Silt, Colo., passed away November 13, 2011 at his home.

He was born May 3, 1926 in Elizabeth, N.J., to John H. and Marie (Gleason) Enright. He enlisted in the Army after high school graduation, but World War II was ending, and he served only one year before he was honorably discharged in 1945. Ray attended Seton Hall University and received a degree in Business Administration.

In 1951, he joined the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Narcotics as an agent assigned to the drug trafficing division. He worked on cases involving obstruction of justice, conspiracy, oranized crime and racketeering, fugitive search, drug thefts, and plant and warehouse security. He was supervisor of the “Special Squad,” a group of agents from the Bureau of Narcotics and the Bureau of Customs attached to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern Judicial District of New York. This group initiated conspiracy cases against organized crime figures engaged in the international narcotic traffic. Ray was involved in the investigative arm of the U.S. Attorney General’s prosecution of the attendees at the infamous Apalachin Summit Conference, otherwise known as an organized crime convention, as well as the prosecution of crime boss, Vito Genovese.

During the 1960s, Ray served as District Supervisor in Atlanta, Ga., which included all Bureau programs in Georgia, Alabama, Florida, South Carolina and Tennessee. He spent a six month period serving as a staff investigator on loan to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, also known as the McClellan Committee.

He served as Assistant Commissioner and coordinated investigations with other U.S. and foreign enforcement agencies with an emphasis on organized crime and racketeering groups.

As Assistant Director in the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, which replaced the Bureau of Narcotics, he was initially responsible for domestic criminal investigations, and later foreign investigations, Ray was responsible for briefing Congress, the Department of Justice, and White House officials, and was a liaison with other agencies on advisory functions, such as forensic laboratory programs to support law enforcement agencies, and measuring enforcement activities as a management tool.

Ray became Director of the Office of Public Affairs, and Special Assistant for Enforcement in Washington D.C., in charge of Congressional relations, public information, and drug abuse prevention. He dealt with inquiries from Congress and public agencies, and the news media.

In 1974, Ray became the Regional Director of the Drug Enforcement Administration, headquartered in Denver, Colo. His region included offices in Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

He was named Director of the Colorado Bureau of Investigation by Governor Richard Lamm in 1977. He served in this capacity until 1984.

In 1987, Ray was named to the Colorado State Board of Parole by Governor Roy Romer. He served in that position until his retirement.

Ray and his wife Janie (Green) moved to Silt, Colo., in 1994, where he lived until his death.

He was a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the American Society for Industrial Security, recipient of the Drug Enforcement Administration is Special Equal Employment Opportunity Award for outstanding commitment and contributions to Equal Opportunity Opportunity, and awarded the Gold Cross of Merit from the Italian Government for enforcement achievements in cooperative efforts between the two countries, among other bureau and departmental awards.

Ray was actively involved in the Peruvian horse, both as a breeder and serving on the national board, and as president of the local club.

He was a beloved father, husband, and friend who will be greatly missed.

He is survived by his loving wife Janie; sons John, Matthew, Daniel, Paul, James, Ryan, and Scott; daughter Laurie Marlin; brother Robert; 17 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

He was preceded in death by his parents, former wife Marjorie; daughter Megan McMechen; and sister Arlene DiLeo.

Memorial services will be held at Littleton’s St. Francis Cabrini Catholic Parish, on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 at 1:30 p.m.

Cremation has taken place.

John Raymond (Ray) Enright, 85, of Silt, Colo., passed away November 13, 2011 at his home.

He was born May 3, 1926 in Elizabeth, N.J., to John H. and Marie (Gleason) Enright. He enlisted in the Army after high school graduation, but World War II was ending, and he served only one year before he was honorably discharged in 1945. Ray attended Seton Hall University and received a degree in Business Administration.

In 1951, he joined the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Narcotics as an agent assigned to the drug trafficing division. He worked on cases involving obstruction of justice, conspiracy, oranized crime and racketeering, fugitive search, drug thefts, and plant and warehouse security. He was supervisor of the “Special Squad,” a group of agents from the Bureau of Narcotics and the Bureau of Customs attached to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern Judicial District of New York. This group initiated conspiracy cases against organized crime figures engaged in the international narcotic traffic. Ray was involved in the investigative arm of the U.S. Attorney General’s prosecution of the attendees at the infamous Apalachin Summit Conference, otherwise known as an organized crime convention, as well as the prosecution of crime boss, Vito Genovese.

During the 1960s, Ray served as District Supervisor in Atlanta, Ga., which included all Bureau programs in Georgia, Alabama, Florida, South Carolina and Tennessee. He spent a six month period serving as a staff investigator on loan to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, also known as the McClellan Committee.

He served as Assistant Commissioner and coordinated investigations with other U.S. and foreign enforcement agencies with an emphasis on organized crime and racketeering groups.

As Assistant Director in the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, which replaced the Bureau of Narcotics, he was initially responsible for domestic criminal investigations, and later foreign investigations, Ray was responsible for briefing Congress, the Department of Justice, and White House officials, and was a liaison with other agencies on advisory functions, such as forensic laboratory programs to support law enforcement agencies, and measuring enforcement activities as a management tool.

Ray became Director of the Office of Public Affairs, and Special Assistant for Enforcement in Washington D.C., in charge of Congressional relations, public information, and drug abuse prevention. He dealt with inquiries from Congress and public agencies, and the news media.

In 1974, Ray became the Regional Director of the Drug Enforcement Administration, headquartered in Denver, Colo. His region included offices in Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

He was named Director of the Colorado Bureau of Investigation by Governor Richard Lamm in 1977. He served in this capacity until 1984.

In 1987, Ray was named to the Colorado State Board of Parole by Governor Roy Romer. He served in that position until his retirement.

Ray and his wife Janie (Green) moved to Silt, Colo., in 1994, where he lived until his death.

He was a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the American Society for Industrial Security, recipient of the Drug Enforcement Administration is Special Equal Employment Opportunity Award for outstanding commitment and contributions to Equal Opportunity Opportunity, and awarded the Gold Cross of Merit from the Italian Government for enforcement achievements in cooperative efforts between the two countries, among other bureau and departmental awards.

Ray was actively involved in the Peruvian horse, both as a breeder and serving on the national board, and as president of the local club.

He was a beloved father, husband, and friend who will be greatly missed.

He is survived by his loving wife Janie; sons John, Matthew, Daniel, Paul, James, Ryan, and Scott; daughter Laurie Marlin; brother Robert; 17 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

He was preceded in death by his parents, former wife Marjorie; daughter Megan McMechen; and sister Arlene DiLeo.

Memorial services will be held at Littleton’s St. Francis Cabrini Catholic Parish, on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 at 1:30 p.m.

Cremation has taken place.

John Raymond (Ray) Enright, 85, of Silt, Colo., passed away November 13, 2011 at his home.

He was born May 3, 1926 in Elizabeth, N.J., to John H. and Marie (Gleason) Enright. He enlisted in the Army after high school graduation, but World War II was ending, and he served only one year before he was honorably discharged in 1945. Ray attended Seton Hall University and received a degree in Business Administration.

In 1951, he joined the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Narcotics as an agent assigned to the drug trafficing division. He worked on cases involving obstruction of justice, conspiracy, oranized crime and racketeering, fugitive search, drug thefts, and plant and warehouse security. He was supervisor of the “Special Squad,” a group of agents from the Bureau of Narcotics and the Bureau of Customs attached to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern Judicial District of New York. This group initiated conspiracy cases against organized crime figures engaged in the international narcotic traffic. Ray was involved in the investigative arm of the U.S. Attorney General’s prosecution of the attendees at the infamous Apalachin Summit Conference, otherwise known as an organized crime convention, as well as the prosecution of crime boss, Vito Genovese.

During the 1960s, Ray served as District Supervisor in Atlanta, Ga., which included all Bureau programs in Georgia, Alabama, Florida, South Carolina and Tennessee. He spent a six month period serving as a staff investigator on loan to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, also known as the McClellan Committee.

He served as Assistant Commissioner and coordinated investigations with other U.S. and foreign enforcement agencies with an emphasis on organized crime and racketeering groups.

As Assistant Director in the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, which replaced the Bureau of Narcotics, he was initially responsible for domestic criminal investigations, and later foreign investigations, Ray was responsible for briefing Congress, the Department of Justice, and White House officials, and was a liaison with other agencies on advisory functions, such as forensic laboratory programs to support law enforcement agencies, and measuring enforcement activities as a management tool.

Ray became Director of the Office of Public Affairs, and Special Assistant for Enforcement in Washington D.C., in charge of Congressional relations, public information, and drug abuse prevention. He dealt with inquiries from Congress and public agencies, and the news media.

In 1974, Ray became the Regional Director of the Drug Enforcement Administration, headquartered in Denver, Colo. His region included offices in Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

He was named Director of the Colorado Bureau of Investigation by Governor Richard Lamm in 1977. He served in this capacity until 1984.

In 1987, Ray was named to the Colorado State Board of Parole by Governor Roy Romer. He served in that position until his retirement.

Ray and his wife Janie (Green) moved to Silt, Colo., in 1994, where he lived until his death.

He was a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the American Society for Industrial Security, recipient of the Drug Enforcement Administration is Special Equal Employment Opportunity Award for outstanding commitment and contributions to Equal Opportunity Opportunity, and awarded the Gold Cross of Merit from the Italian Government for enforcement achievements in cooperative efforts between the two countries, among other bureau and departmental awards.

Ray was actively involved in the Peruvian horse, both as a breeder and serving on the national board, and as president of the local club.

He was a beloved father, husband, and friend who will be greatly missed.

He is survived by his loving wife Janie; sons John, Matthew, Daniel, Paul, James, Ryan, and Scott; daughter Laurie Marlin; brother Robert; 17 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

He was preceded in death by his parents, former wife Marjorie; daughter Megan McMechen; and sister Arlene DiLeo.

Memorial services will be held at Littleton’s St. Francis Cabrini Catholic Parish, on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 at 1:30 p.m.

Cremation has taken place.