Rocky Mountain Obituaries 4-4-11 | TheFencePost.com

Rocky Mountain Obituaries 4-4-11

Charlie Metro, 92, of Buckingham, Va., passed away March 18, 2011.

He was born in Nanty-Glo, Pa., on April 28, 1918 to Metro and Pauline Moreskonich. He was the eldest son of nine children. When he started playing baseball, he used Metro for his last name as a sports reporter told him that Moreskonich would not fit in a newspaper box score.

His father was a coal miner and Charlie went to work in the mines after school and in the summers when he was a teenager. There was a mine explosion in 1937 and Charlie rescued his father and his father’s best friend from the mine. The concussion he suffered in the explosion made him 4-F during WW II so he was the Chief Inspector at the munitions plant in Mayfield, Ky., during the off season of 1942, 1943 and 1944.

He was a long time baseball player, manager, coach and scout. Charlie had three loves in his life, his wife of 70 years, Helen, baseball and horses. He was one of the fortunate people in the world who got to work at what they love. Charlie started his baseball career in 1937 with the Easton, Md., Browns. In 1939, he was playing for the Mayfield, Ky., Browns when a cute little “Dixie Cupcake” caught his eye. They were married on April 3, 1941 in Texarkana, Texas, at the start of the baseball season. Charlie played for the Philadelphia Athletics and the Detroit Tigers during WW II. His family always teased him about having to go down to the minors when the good ball players came back in 1945.

He started his managing career as a manager/player with the Bisbee Bees in 1947. His managing career spanned 1947 through 1971 including the Denver Bears, Vancouver Canucks, Tulsa Oilers, Chicago Cubs and White Sox and the Kansas City Royals. He then took his talent for spotting exceptional players to the scouting part of baseball. He was the first scout to not list race on his scouting reports, as he did not believe it was a factor in a man’s talent. More on Charlie’s career can be found at http://www.baseball-reference.com

When Charlie accepted the manager position with the Denver Bears, he and Helen decided to make Colorado their off season home. In 1962, they purchased acreage northwest of Arvada, Colo., and started a ranch. Charlie dealt in cattle for a couple of years. Then a long time friend, Bish Jenkins, sent Charlie and Helen their first registered quarter horse mare. It was love at first sight! They spent the next 30 years raising quarter horses crossing the mares with Thoroughbreds, most notably Dance Lesson who held the record for the three furlongs at 32.5 seconds.

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After retirement, Charlie and his friend, Tom Altherr, collaborated on his autobiography, “Safe by a Mile.” He also created Hitters Hands with a local Denver artist. Life size hands of Baseball Hall of Fame inductees were cast in bronze for sale to the public.

He is survived by the love of his life, Helen; his daughter, Elena; and sons, Charles, Jr. (Bhavani), Stephen W. (Janet) and Geoff S. (Jennifer); 11 grandchildren; 19 great grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; his sister, Pauline Loyning of Montana; brothers, Joe Metro (Rose) of Pennsylvania and Jim Metro (Maggie) of Wyoming; and three World Series Rings from the Dodgers.

Memorial services were held in Buckingham,Va., where Charlie and Helen have lived for the past three years. In Colorado, Charlie’s family and friends are gathering for a Celebration of His Life on April 9, 2011 from 1-4 p.m., at the home of one of his granddaughters. For directions, please call Elena Metro at (303) 810-7332.

Charlie Metro, 92, of Buckingham, Va., passed away March 18, 2011.

He was born in Nanty-Glo, Pa., on April 28, 1918 to Metro and Pauline Moreskonich. He was the eldest son of nine children. When he started playing baseball, he used Metro for his last name as a sports reporter told him that Moreskonich would not fit in a newspaper box score.

His father was a coal miner and Charlie went to work in the mines after school and in the summers when he was a teenager. There was a mine explosion in 1937 and Charlie rescued his father and his father’s best friend from the mine. The concussion he suffered in the explosion made him 4-F during WW II so he was the Chief Inspector at the munitions plant in Mayfield, Ky., during the off season of 1942, 1943 and 1944.

He was a long time baseball player, manager, coach and scout. Charlie had three loves in his life, his wife of 70 years, Helen, baseball and horses. He was one of the fortunate people in the world who got to work at what they love. Charlie started his baseball career in 1937 with the Easton, Md., Browns. In 1939, he was playing for the Mayfield, Ky., Browns when a cute little “Dixie Cupcake” caught his eye. They were married on April 3, 1941 in Texarkana, Texas, at the start of the baseball season. Charlie played for the Philadelphia Athletics and the Detroit Tigers during WW II. His family always teased him about having to go down to the minors when the good ball players came back in 1945.

He started his managing career as a manager/player with the Bisbee Bees in 1947. His managing career spanned 1947 through 1971 including the Denver Bears, Vancouver Canucks, Tulsa Oilers, Chicago Cubs and White Sox and the Kansas City Royals. He then took his talent for spotting exceptional players to the scouting part of baseball. He was the first scout to not list race on his scouting reports, as he did not believe it was a factor in a man’s talent. More on Charlie’s career can be found at http://www.baseball-reference.com

When Charlie accepted the manager position with the Denver Bears, he and Helen decided to make Colorado their off season home. In 1962, they purchased acreage northwest of Arvada, Colo., and started a ranch. Charlie dealt in cattle for a couple of years. Then a long time friend, Bish Jenkins, sent Charlie and Helen their first registered quarter horse mare. It was love at first sight! They spent the next 30 years raising quarter horses crossing the mares with Thoroughbreds, most notably Dance Lesson who held the record for the three furlongs at 32.5 seconds.

After retirement, Charlie and his friend, Tom Altherr, collaborated on his autobiography, “Safe by a Mile.” He also created Hitters Hands with a local Denver artist. Life size hands of Baseball Hall of Fame inductees were cast in bronze for sale to the public.

He is survived by the love of his life, Helen; his daughter, Elena; and sons, Charles, Jr. (Bhavani), Stephen W. (Janet) and Geoff S. (Jennifer); 11 grandchildren; 19 great grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; his sister, Pauline Loyning of Montana; brothers, Joe Metro (Rose) of Pennsylvania and Jim Metro (Maggie) of Wyoming; and three World Series Rings from the Dodgers.

Memorial services were held in Buckingham,Va., where Charlie and Helen have lived for the past three years. In Colorado, Charlie’s family and friends are gathering for a Celebration of His Life on April 9, 2011 from 1-4 p.m., at the home of one of his granddaughters. For directions, please call Elena Metro at (303) 810-7332.

Charlie Metro, 92, of Buckingham, Va., passed away March 18, 2011.

He was born in Nanty-Glo, Pa., on April 28, 1918 to Metro and Pauline Moreskonich. He was the eldest son of nine children. When he started playing baseball, he used Metro for his last name as a sports reporter told him that Moreskonich would not fit in a newspaper box score.

His father was a coal miner and Charlie went to work in the mines after school and in the summers when he was a teenager. There was a mine explosion in 1937 and Charlie rescued his father and his father’s best friend from the mine. The concussion he suffered in the explosion made him 4-F during WW II so he was the Chief Inspector at the munitions plant in Mayfield, Ky., during the off season of 1942, 1943 and 1944.

He was a long time baseball player, manager, coach and scout. Charlie had three loves in his life, his wife of 70 years, Helen, baseball and horses. He was one of the fortunate people in the world who got to work at what they love. Charlie started his baseball career in 1937 with the Easton, Md., Browns. In 1939, he was playing for the Mayfield, Ky., Browns when a cute little “Dixie Cupcake” caught his eye. They were married on April 3, 1941 in Texarkana, Texas, at the start of the baseball season. Charlie played for the Philadelphia Athletics and the Detroit Tigers during WW II. His family always teased him about having to go down to the minors when the good ball players came back in 1945.

He started his managing career as a manager/player with the Bisbee Bees in 1947. His managing career spanned 1947 through 1971 including the Denver Bears, Vancouver Canucks, Tulsa Oilers, Chicago Cubs and White Sox and the Kansas City Royals. He then took his talent for spotting exceptional players to the scouting part of baseball. He was the first scout to not list race on his scouting reports, as he did not believe it was a factor in a man’s talent. More on Charlie’s career can be found at http://www.baseball-reference.com

When Charlie accepted the manager position with the Denver Bears, he and Helen decided to make Colorado their off season home. In 1962, they purchased acreage northwest of Arvada, Colo., and started a ranch. Charlie dealt in cattle for a couple of years. Then a long time friend, Bish Jenkins, sent Charlie and Helen their first registered quarter horse mare. It was love at first sight! They spent the next 30 years raising quarter horses crossing the mares with Thoroughbreds, most notably Dance Lesson who held the record for the three furlongs at 32.5 seconds.

After retirement, Charlie and his friend, Tom Altherr, collaborated on his autobiography, “Safe by a Mile.” He also created Hitters Hands with a local Denver artist. Life size hands of Baseball Hall of Fame inductees were cast in bronze for sale to the public.

He is survived by the love of his life, Helen; his daughter, Elena; and sons, Charles, Jr. (Bhavani), Stephen W. (Janet) and Geoff S. (Jennifer); 11 grandchildren; 19 great grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; his sister, Pauline Loyning of Montana; brothers, Joe Metro (Rose) of Pennsylvania and Jim Metro (Maggie) of Wyoming; and three World Series Rings from the Dodgers.

Memorial services were held in Buckingham,Va., where Charlie and Helen have lived for the past three years. In Colorado, Charlie’s family and friends are gathering for a Celebration of His Life on April 9, 2011 from 1-4 p.m., at the home of one of his granddaughters. For directions, please call Elena Metro at (303) 810-7332.

Charlie Metro, 92, of Buckingham, Va., passed away March 18, 2011.

He was born in Nanty-Glo, Pa., on April 28, 1918 to Metro and Pauline Moreskonich. He was the eldest son of nine children. When he started playing baseball, he used Metro for his last name as a sports reporter told him that Moreskonich would not fit in a newspaper box score.

His father was a coal miner and Charlie went to work in the mines after school and in the summers when he was a teenager. There was a mine explosion in 1937 and Charlie rescued his father and his father’s best friend from the mine. The concussion he suffered in the explosion made him 4-F during WW II so he was the Chief Inspector at the munitions plant in Mayfield, Ky., during the off season of 1942, 1943 and 1944.

He was a long time baseball player, manager, coach and scout. Charlie had three loves in his life, his wife of 70 years, Helen, baseball and horses. He was one of the fortunate people in the world who got to work at what they love. Charlie started his baseball career in 1937 with the Easton, Md., Browns. In 1939, he was playing for the Mayfield, Ky., Browns when a cute little “Dixie Cupcake” caught his eye. They were married on April 3, 1941 in Texarkana, Texas, at the start of the baseball season. Charlie played for the Philadelphia Athletics and the Detroit Tigers during WW II. His family always teased him about having to go down to the minors when the good ball players came back in 1945.

He started his managing career as a manager/player with the Bisbee Bees in 1947. His managing career spanned 1947 through 1971 including the Denver Bears, Vancouver Canucks, Tulsa Oilers, Chicago Cubs and White Sox and the Kansas City Royals. He then took his talent for spotting exceptional players to the scouting part of baseball. He was the first scout to not list race on his scouting reports, as he did not believe it was a factor in a man’s talent. More on Charlie’s career can be found at http://www.baseball-reference.com

When Charlie accepted the manager position with the Denver Bears, he and Helen decided to make Colorado their off season home. In 1962, they purchased acreage northwest of Arvada, Colo., and started a ranch. Charlie dealt in cattle for a couple of years. Then a long time friend, Bish Jenkins, sent Charlie and Helen their first registered quarter horse mare. It was love at first sight! They spent the next 30 years raising quarter horses crossing the mares with Thoroughbreds, most notably Dance Lesson who held the record for the three furlongs at 32.5 seconds.

After retirement, Charlie and his friend, Tom Altherr, collaborated on his autobiography, “Safe by a Mile.” He also created Hitters Hands with a local Denver artist. Life size hands of Baseball Hall of Fame inductees were cast in bronze for sale to the public.

He is survived by the love of his life, Helen; his daughter, Elena; and sons, Charles, Jr. (Bhavani), Stephen W. (Janet) and Geoff S. (Jennifer); 11 grandchildren; 19 great grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; his sister, Pauline Loyning of Montana; brothers, Joe Metro (Rose) of Pennsylvania and Jim Metro (Maggie) of Wyoming; and three World Series Rings from the Dodgers.

Memorial services were held in Buckingham,Va., where Charlie and Helen have lived for the past three years. In Colorado, Charlie’s family and friends are gathering for a Celebration of His Life on April 9, 2011 from 1-4 p.m., at the home of one of his granddaughters. For directions, please call Elena Metro at (303) 810-7332.

Charlie Metro, 92, of Buckingham, Va., passed away March 18, 2011.

He was born in Nanty-Glo, Pa., on April 28, 1918 to Metro and Pauline Moreskonich. He was the eldest son of nine children. When he started playing baseball, he used Metro for his last name as a sports reporter told him that Moreskonich would not fit in a newspaper box score.

His father was a coal miner and Charlie went to work in the mines after school and in the summers when he was a teenager. There was a mine explosion in 1937 and Charlie rescued his father and his father’s best friend from the mine. The concussion he suffered in the explosion made him 4-F during WW II so he was the Chief Inspector at the munitions plant in Mayfield, Ky., during the off season of 1942, 1943 and 1944.

He was a long time baseball player, manager, coach and scout. Charlie had three loves in his life, his wife of 70 years, Helen, baseball and horses. He was one of the fortunate people in the world who got to work at what they love. Charlie started his baseball career in 1937 with the Easton, Md., Browns. In 1939, he was playing for the Mayfield, Ky., Browns when a cute little “Dixie Cupcake” caught his eye. They were married on April 3, 1941 in Texarkana, Texas, at the start of the baseball season. Charlie played for the Philadelphia Athletics and the Detroit Tigers during WW II. His family always teased him about having to go down to the minors when the good ball players came back in 1945.

He started his managing career as a manager/player with the Bisbee Bees in 1947. His managing career spanned 1947 through 1971 including the Denver Bears, Vancouver Canucks, Tulsa Oilers, Chicago Cubs and White Sox and the Kansas City Royals. He then took his talent for spotting exceptional players to the scouting part of baseball. He was the first scout to not list race on his scouting reports, as he did not believe it was a factor in a man’s talent. More on Charlie’s career can be found at http://www.baseball-reference.com

When Charlie accepted the manager position with the Denver Bears, he and Helen decided to make Colorado their off season home. In 1962, they purchased acreage northwest of Arvada, Colo., and started a ranch. Charlie dealt in cattle for a couple of years. Then a long time friend, Bish Jenkins, sent Charlie and Helen their first registered quarter horse mare. It was love at first sight! They spent the next 30 years raising quarter horses crossing the mares with Thoroughbreds, most notably Dance Lesson who held the record for the three furlongs at 32.5 seconds.

After retirement, Charlie and his friend, Tom Altherr, collaborated on his autobiography, “Safe by a Mile.” He also created Hitters Hands with a local Denver artist. Life size hands of Baseball Hall of Fame inductees were cast in bronze for sale to the public.

He is survived by the love of his life, Helen; his daughter, Elena; and sons, Charles, Jr. (Bhavani), Stephen W. (Janet) and Geoff S. (Jennifer); 11 grandchildren; 19 great grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; his sister, Pauline Loyning of Montana; brothers, Joe Metro (Rose) of Pennsylvania and Jim Metro (Maggie) of Wyoming; and three World Series Rings from the Dodgers.

Memorial services were held in Buckingham,Va., where Charlie and Helen have lived for the past three years. In Colorado, Charlie’s family and friends are gathering for a Celebration of His Life on April 9, 2011 from 1-4 p.m., at the home of one of his granddaughters. For directions, please call Elena Metro at (303) 810-7332.

Charlie Metro, 92, of Buckingham, Va., passed away March 18, 2011.

He was born in Nanty-Glo, Pa., on April 28, 1918 to Metro and Pauline Moreskonich. He was the eldest son of nine children. When he started playing baseball, he used Metro for his last name as a sports reporter told him that Moreskonich would not fit in a newspaper box score.

His father was a coal miner and Charlie went to work in the mines after school and in the summers when he was a teenager. There was a mine explosion in 1937 and Charlie rescued his father and his father’s best friend from the mine. The concussion he suffered in the explosion made him 4-F during WW II so he was the Chief Inspector at the munitions plant in Mayfield, Ky., during the off season of 1942, 1943 and 1944.

He was a long time baseball player, manager, coach and scout. Charlie had three loves in his life, his wife of 70 years, Helen, baseball and horses. He was one of the fortunate people in the world who got to work at what they love. Charlie started his baseball career in 1937 with the Easton, Md., Browns. In 1939, he was playing for the Mayfield, Ky., Browns when a cute little “Dixie Cupcake” caught his eye. They were married on April 3, 1941 in Texarkana, Texas, at the start of the baseball season. Charlie played for the Philadelphia Athletics and the Detroit Tigers during WW II. His family always teased him about having to go down to the minors when the good ball players came back in 1945.

He started his managing career as a manager/player with the Bisbee Bees in 1947. His managing career spanned 1947 through 1971 including the Denver Bears, Vancouver Canucks, Tulsa Oilers, Chicago Cubs and White Sox and the Kansas City Royals. He then took his talent for spotting exceptional players to the scouting part of baseball. He was the first scout to not list race on his scouting reports, as he did not believe it was a factor in a man’s talent. More on Charlie’s career can be found at http://www.baseball-reference.com

When Charlie accepted the manager position with the Denver Bears, he and Helen decided to make Colorado their off season home. In 1962, they purchased acreage northwest of Arvada, Colo., and started a ranch. Charlie dealt in cattle for a couple of years. Then a long time friend, Bish Jenkins, sent Charlie and Helen their first registered quarter horse mare. It was love at first sight! They spent the next 30 years raising quarter horses crossing the mares with Thoroughbreds, most notably Dance Lesson who held the record for the three furlongs at 32.5 seconds.

After retirement, Charlie and his friend, Tom Altherr, collaborated on his autobiography, “Safe by a Mile.” He also created Hitters Hands with a local Denver artist. Life size hands of Baseball Hall of Fame inductees were cast in bronze for sale to the public.

He is survived by the love of his life, Helen; his daughter, Elena; and sons, Charles, Jr. (Bhavani), Stephen W. (Janet) and Geoff S. (Jennifer); 11 grandchildren; 19 great grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; his sister, Pauline Loyning of Montana; brothers, Joe Metro (Rose) of Pennsylvania and Jim Metro (Maggie) of Wyoming; and three World Series Rings from the Dodgers.

Memorial services were held in Buckingham,Va., where Charlie and Helen have lived for the past three years. In Colorado, Charlie’s family and friends are gathering for a Celebration of His Life on April 9, 2011 from 1-4 p.m., at the home of one of his granddaughters. For directions, please call Elena Metro at (303) 810-7332.