Rocky Mountain Obituaries 8-15-11 | TheFencePost.com

Rocky Mountain Obituaries 8-15-11

Dr. David Lee Morris, DVM, PhD, 61, passed away August 3, 2011, unexpectedly.

He was born on May 22, 1950 to John Franklin Morris and Nellie Lizabeth Morris in Salem, Ohio. He spent his childhood and adolescence on the family farm in Columbiana, Ohio, a member of the sixth generation of his family to actively participate in agriculture. He enjoyed, (a word he often used), the farm immensely, and forged many of his positive character traits while assisting his family, (another common theme in his life), with day-to-day demands of farming. Growing up on the farm, David learned many skills, but most importantly he learned how to analyze a problem and develop a solution. He employed this skill throughout his life and considered it vitally important to his legacy as a father to pass this trait on to his children.

David’s family introduced him to Colorado, visiting with his parents as a youth on family summer vacations. Additionally, he spent six weeks in the summer of 1967 with his older brother, Paul, working on the ranch of a family relative living near Parlin, Colo. He often shared that as one of his fondest memories of that summer was winning the packhorse race at that year’s Cattlemen’s Days event in downtown Gunnison, Colo. By the time he graduated from Columbiana High School in 1968, he had set a goal to return someday to Colorado.

After attending his first year of undergraduate education at Marietta College in southeastern Ohio on a football scholarship, David elected to pursue academics over athletics and enrolled in The Ohio State University. His attendance at Ohio State coincided with the Woody Hayes “three yards and a cloud of dust” era of Ohio State Football. For part of his student life, he even lived in a special dormitory inside Ohio Stadium; his interest in the team remained throughout his life.

In 1974, David graduated from The Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine. He and his brother Paul, a classmate of his in the graduating vet school class, headed west to Fort Collins, Colo., to begin a one year internship at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Living in Fort Collins, Colo., that year confirmed to him that Colorado would be his home. His path, however, to remaining in Fort Collins, Colo., would lead him first to Texas.

The School of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University in College Station in Texas was David’s next stop. There he earned his masters and PhD degrees, and became Board Certified in Theriogenology. In 1977, he was asked to join the Teaching Faculty at Texas A&M. More importantly, College Station was where he also met his beloved wife Lynne. They married in 1979 in Denton, Tex. Their first child, son Brandon, arrived in 1982. Daughter Bethany joined the family in 1986.

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While in the midst of completing his degrees and lovingly caring for his growing family, he spent 14 years on faculty instructing veterinary students in large animal surgery and reproduction. David found reproduction, particularly genetic traits and hereditability, supremely interesting. In 1989, David received an invitation to join the faculty at the Colorado State University Teaching Hospital, which he accepted. He remained on faculty at CSU until 1994, at which time he entered private veterinary practice. More valued by David, however, was the fact that he had achieved his goal of returning to Colorado to raise his family. He and Lynne purchased a small family farm, 10 acres, in 1992, which remains in the family to this day. In 2000, David accepted a position as a National Team Leader within the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service (CSREES). In 2005, he switched agencies within the USDA to the Animal Plant Health and Inspection Service, Veterinary Services (APHIS/VS) to support the animal identification and animal disease traceability program. He worked to provide the Nation with a reliable, cost-effective and accurate system of animal identification, ranging from goats, cattle, horses, swine, sheep, and even aquaculture, so that in the event of disease outbreak, epidemiological traceability would be ensured.

Dave wrote the “Vet Column” for the Fence Post for nearly 20 years. By David’s best guess, he trained more than 2,500 veterinarians over the course of his 20 year career in academia and maintained mentor relationships with any student who chose to keep in touch and pick his ample mind from time to time. As a veterinarian, he always strove to provide sound, practical, and thoughtful advice to clients, but importantly, also to anyone who expressed interest in simply “knowing more.” Most recently, David worked tirelessly to ensure a healthy and viable livestock population through advocating public policy on animal disease traceability and continuing to offer advice based on sound scientific facts.

He was affectionately known as “Dr. Dave”, our husband and father. We deeply and unimaginably grieve his loss, yet find solace in the knowledge that he was called upon by his Lord and Savior while under a blue Colorado sky, just moments after he finished caring for his beloved herd of beef cattle.

He is survived by his loving and devoted wife of 32 years, Lynne; his son Brandon, and his daughter, Bethany; his mother Nellie Lizabeth Morris and brother, Paul Gary Morris, DVM.

He was preceded in death by his father, John Franklin Morris.

Memorial services were held August 8, 2011 at Allnutt Funeral Service in Fort Collins, Colo.

Interment was in Resthaven Memory Gardens in Fort Collins, Colo.

Dr. David Lee Morris, DVM, PhD, 61, passed away August 3, 2011, unexpectedly.

He was born on May 22, 1950 to John Franklin Morris and Nellie Lizabeth Morris in Salem, Ohio. He spent his childhood and adolescence on the family farm in Columbiana, Ohio, a member of the sixth generation of his family to actively participate in agriculture. He enjoyed, (a word he often used), the farm immensely, and forged many of his positive character traits while assisting his family, (another common theme in his life), with day-to-day demands of farming. Growing up on the farm, David learned many skills, but most importantly he learned how to analyze a problem and develop a solution. He employed this skill throughout his life and considered it vitally important to his legacy as a father to pass this trait on to his children.

David’s family introduced him to Colorado, visiting with his parents as a youth on family summer vacations. Additionally, he spent six weeks in the summer of 1967 with his older brother, Paul, working on the ranch of a family relative living near Parlin, Colo. He often shared that as one of his fondest memories of that summer was winning the packhorse race at that year’s Cattlemen’s Days event in downtown Gunnison, Colo. By the time he graduated from Columbiana High School in 1968, he had set a goal to return someday to Colorado.

After attending his first year of undergraduate education at Marietta College in southeastern Ohio on a football scholarship, David elected to pursue academics over athletics and enrolled in The Ohio State University. His attendance at Ohio State coincided with the Woody Hayes “three yards and a cloud of dust” era of Ohio State Football. For part of his student life, he even lived in a special dormitory inside Ohio Stadium; his interest in the team remained throughout his life.

In 1974, David graduated from The Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine. He and his brother Paul, a classmate of his in the graduating vet school class, headed west to Fort Collins, Colo., to begin a one year internship at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Living in Fort Collins, Colo., that year confirmed to him that Colorado would be his home. His path, however, to remaining in Fort Collins, Colo., would lead him first to Texas.

The School of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University in College Station in Texas was David’s next stop. There he earned his masters and PhD degrees, and became Board Certified in Theriogenology. In 1977, he was asked to join the Teaching Faculty at Texas A&M. More importantly, College Station was where he also met his beloved wife Lynne. They married in 1979 in Denton, Tex. Their first child, son Brandon, arrived in 1982. Daughter Bethany joined the family in 1986.

While in the midst of completing his degrees and lovingly caring for his growing family, he spent 14 years on faculty instructing veterinary students in large animal surgery and reproduction. David found reproduction, particularly genetic traits and hereditability, supremely interesting. In 1989, David received an invitation to join the faculty at the Colorado State University Teaching Hospital, which he accepted. He remained on faculty at CSU until 1994, at which time he entered private veterinary practice. More valued by David, however, was the fact that he had achieved his goal of returning to Colorado to raise his family. He and Lynne purchased a small family farm, 10 acres, in 1992, which remains in the family to this day. In 2000, David accepted a position as a National Team Leader within the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service (CSREES). In 2005, he switched agencies within the USDA to the Animal Plant Health and Inspection Service, Veterinary Services (APHIS/VS) to support the animal identification and animal disease traceability program. He worked to provide the Nation with a reliable, cost-effective and accurate system of animal identification, ranging from goats, cattle, horses, swine, sheep, and even aquaculture, so that in the event of disease outbreak, epidemiological traceability would be ensured.

Dave wrote the “Vet Column” for the Fence Post for nearly 20 years. By David’s best guess, he trained more than 2,500 veterinarians over the course of his 20 year career in academia and maintained mentor relationships with any student who chose to keep in touch and pick his ample mind from time to time. As a veterinarian, he always strove to provide sound, practical, and thoughtful advice to clients, but importantly, also to anyone who expressed interest in simply “knowing more.” Most recently, David worked tirelessly to ensure a healthy and viable livestock population through advocating public policy on animal disease traceability and continuing to offer advice based on sound scientific facts.

He was affectionately known as “Dr. Dave”, our husband and father. We deeply and unimaginably grieve his loss, yet find solace in the knowledge that he was called upon by his Lord and Savior while under a blue Colorado sky, just moments after he finished caring for his beloved herd of beef cattle.

He is survived by his loving and devoted wife of 32 years, Lynne; his son Brandon, and his daughter, Bethany; his mother Nellie Lizabeth Morris and brother, Paul Gary Morris, DVM.

He was preceded in death by his father, John Franklin Morris.

Memorial services were held August 8, 2011 at Allnutt Funeral Service in Fort Collins, Colo.

Interment was in Resthaven Memory Gardens in Fort Collins, Colo.

Dr. David Lee Morris, DVM, PhD, 61, passed away August 3, 2011, unexpectedly.

He was born on May 22, 1950 to John Franklin Morris and Nellie Lizabeth Morris in Salem, Ohio. He spent his childhood and adolescence on the family farm in Columbiana, Ohio, a member of the sixth generation of his family to actively participate in agriculture. He enjoyed, (a word he often used), the farm immensely, and forged many of his positive character traits while assisting his family, (another common theme in his life), with day-to-day demands of farming. Growing up on the farm, David learned many skills, but most importantly he learned how to analyze a problem and develop a solution. He employed this skill throughout his life and considered it vitally important to his legacy as a father to pass this trait on to his children.

David’s family introduced him to Colorado, visiting with his parents as a youth on family summer vacations. Additionally, he spent six weeks in the summer of 1967 with his older brother, Paul, working on the ranch of a family relative living near Parlin, Colo. He often shared that as one of his fondest memories of that summer was winning the packhorse race at that year’s Cattlemen’s Days event in downtown Gunnison, Colo. By the time he graduated from Columbiana High School in 1968, he had set a goal to return someday to Colorado.

After attending his first year of undergraduate education at Marietta College in southeastern Ohio on a football scholarship, David elected to pursue academics over athletics and enrolled in The Ohio State University. His attendance at Ohio State coincided with the Woody Hayes “three yards and a cloud of dust” era of Ohio State Football. For part of his student life, he even lived in a special dormitory inside Ohio Stadium; his interest in the team remained throughout his life.

In 1974, David graduated from The Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine. He and his brother Paul, a classmate of his in the graduating vet school class, headed west to Fort Collins, Colo., to begin a one year internship at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Living in Fort Collins, Colo., that year confirmed to him that Colorado would be his home. His path, however, to remaining in Fort Collins, Colo., would lead him first to Texas.

The School of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University in College Station in Texas was David’s next stop. There he earned his masters and PhD degrees, and became Board Certified in Theriogenology. In 1977, he was asked to join the Teaching Faculty at Texas A&M. More importantly, College Station was where he also met his beloved wife Lynne. They married in 1979 in Denton, Tex. Their first child, son Brandon, arrived in 1982. Daughter Bethany joined the family in 1986.

While in the midst of completing his degrees and lovingly caring for his growing family, he spent 14 years on faculty instructing veterinary students in large animal surgery and reproduction. David found reproduction, particularly genetic traits and hereditability, supremely interesting. In 1989, David received an invitation to join the faculty at the Colorado State University Teaching Hospital, which he accepted. He remained on faculty at CSU until 1994, at which time he entered private veterinary practice. More valued by David, however, was the fact that he had achieved his goal of returning to Colorado to raise his family. He and Lynne purchased a small family farm, 10 acres, in 1992, which remains in the family to this day. In 2000, David accepted a position as a National Team Leader within the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service (CSREES). In 2005, he switched agencies within the USDA to the Animal Plant Health and Inspection Service, Veterinary Services (APHIS/VS) to support the animal identification and animal disease traceability program. He worked to provide the Nation with a reliable, cost-effective and accurate system of animal identification, ranging from goats, cattle, horses, swine, sheep, and even aquaculture, so that in the event of disease outbreak, epidemiological traceability would be ensured.

Dave wrote the “Vet Column” for the Fence Post for nearly 20 years. By David’s best guess, he trained more than 2,500 veterinarians over the course of his 20 year career in academia and maintained mentor relationships with any student who chose to keep in touch and pick his ample mind from time to time. As a veterinarian, he always strove to provide sound, practical, and thoughtful advice to clients, but importantly, also to anyone who expressed interest in simply “knowing more.” Most recently, David worked tirelessly to ensure a healthy and viable livestock population through advocating public policy on animal disease traceability and continuing to offer advice based on sound scientific facts.

He was affectionately known as “Dr. Dave”, our husband and father. We deeply and unimaginably grieve his loss, yet find solace in the knowledge that he was called upon by his Lord and Savior while under a blue Colorado sky, just moments after he finished caring for his beloved herd of beef cattle.

He is survived by his loving and devoted wife of 32 years, Lynne; his son Brandon, and his daughter, Bethany; his mother Nellie Lizabeth Morris and brother, Paul Gary Morris, DVM.

He was preceded in death by his father, John Franklin Morris.

Memorial services were held August 8, 2011 at Allnutt Funeral Service in Fort Collins, Colo.

Interment was in Resthaven Memory Gardens in Fort Collins, Colo.

Dr. David Lee Morris, DVM, PhD, 61, passed away August 3, 2011, unexpectedly.

He was born on May 22, 1950 to John Franklin Morris and Nellie Lizabeth Morris in Salem, Ohio. He spent his childhood and adolescence on the family farm in Columbiana, Ohio, a member of the sixth generation of his family to actively participate in agriculture. He enjoyed, (a word he often used), the farm immensely, and forged many of his positive character traits while assisting his family, (another common theme in his life), with day-to-day demands of farming. Growing up on the farm, David learned many skills, but most importantly he learned how to analyze a problem and develop a solution. He employed this skill throughout his life and considered it vitally important to his legacy as a father to pass this trait on to his children.

David’s family introduced him to Colorado, visiting with his parents as a youth on family summer vacations. Additionally, he spent six weeks in the summer of 1967 with his older brother, Paul, working on the ranch of a family relative living near Parlin, Colo. He often shared that as one of his fondest memories of that summer was winning the packhorse race at that year’s Cattlemen’s Days event in downtown Gunnison, Colo. By the time he graduated from Columbiana High School in 1968, he had set a goal to return someday to Colorado.

After attending his first year of undergraduate education at Marietta College in southeastern Ohio on a football scholarship, David elected to pursue academics over athletics and enrolled in The Ohio State University. His attendance at Ohio State coincided with the Woody Hayes “three yards and a cloud of dust” era of Ohio State Football. For part of his student life, he even lived in a special dormitory inside Ohio Stadium; his interest in the team remained throughout his life.

In 1974, David graduated from The Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine. He and his brother Paul, a classmate of his in the graduating vet school class, headed west to Fort Collins, Colo., to begin a one year internship at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Living in Fort Collins, Colo., that year confirmed to him that Colorado would be his home. His path, however, to remaining in Fort Collins, Colo., would lead him first to Texas.

The School of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University in College Station in Texas was David’s next stop. There he earned his masters and PhD degrees, and became Board Certified in Theriogenology. In 1977, he was asked to join the Teaching Faculty at Texas A&M. More importantly, College Station was where he also met his beloved wife Lynne. They married in 1979 in Denton, Tex. Their first child, son Brandon, arrived in 1982. Daughter Bethany joined the family in 1986.

While in the midst of completing his degrees and lovingly caring for his growing family, he spent 14 years on faculty instructing veterinary students in large animal surgery and reproduction. David found reproduction, particularly genetic traits and hereditability, supremely interesting. In 1989, David received an invitation to join the faculty at the Colorado State University Teaching Hospital, which he accepted. He remained on faculty at CSU until 1994, at which time he entered private veterinary practice. More valued by David, however, was the fact that he had achieved his goal of returning to Colorado to raise his family. He and Lynne purchased a small family farm, 10 acres, in 1992, which remains in the family to this day. In 2000, David accepted a position as a National Team Leader within the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service (CSREES). In 2005, he switched agencies within the USDA to the Animal Plant Health and Inspection Service, Veterinary Services (APHIS/VS) to support the animal identification and animal disease traceability program. He worked to provide the Nation with a reliable, cost-effective and accurate system of animal identification, ranging from goats, cattle, horses, swine, sheep, and even aquaculture, so that in the event of disease outbreak, epidemiological traceability would be ensured.

Dave wrote the “Vet Column” for the Fence Post for nearly 20 years. By David’s best guess, he trained more than 2,500 veterinarians over the course of his 20 year career in academia and maintained mentor relationships with any student who chose to keep in touch and pick his ample mind from time to time. As a veterinarian, he always strove to provide sound, practical, and thoughtful advice to clients, but importantly, also to anyone who expressed interest in simply “knowing more.” Most recently, David worked tirelessly to ensure a healthy and viable livestock population through advocating public policy on animal disease traceability and continuing to offer advice based on sound scientific facts.

He was affectionately known as “Dr. Dave”, our husband and father. We deeply and unimaginably grieve his loss, yet find solace in the knowledge that he was called upon by his Lord and Savior while under a blue Colorado sky, just moments after he finished caring for his beloved herd of beef cattle.

He is survived by his loving and devoted wife of 32 years, Lynne; his son Brandon, and his daughter, Bethany; his mother Nellie Lizabeth Morris and brother, Paul Gary Morris, DVM.

He was preceded in death by his father, John Franklin Morris.

Memorial services were held August 8, 2011 at Allnutt Funeral Service in Fort Collins, Colo.

Interment was in Resthaven Memory Gardens in Fort Collins, Colo.

Dr. David Lee Morris, DVM, PhD, 61, passed away August 3, 2011, unexpectedly.

He was born on May 22, 1950 to John Franklin Morris and Nellie Lizabeth Morris in Salem, Ohio. He spent his childhood and adolescence on the family farm in Columbiana, Ohio, a member of the sixth generation of his family to actively participate in agriculture. He enjoyed, (a word he often used), the farm immensely, and forged many of his positive character traits while assisting his family, (another common theme in his life), with day-to-day demands of farming. Growing up on the farm, David learned many skills, but most importantly he learned how to analyze a problem and develop a solution. He employed this skill throughout his life and considered it vitally important to his legacy as a father to pass this trait on to his children.

David’s family introduced him to Colorado, visiting with his parents as a youth on family summer vacations. Additionally, he spent six weeks in the summer of 1967 with his older brother, Paul, working on the ranch of a family relative living near Parlin, Colo. He often shared that as one of his fondest memories of that summer was winning the packhorse race at that year’s Cattlemen’s Days event in downtown Gunnison, Colo. By the time he graduated from Columbiana High School in 1968, he had set a goal to return someday to Colorado.

After attending his first year of undergraduate education at Marietta College in southeastern Ohio on a football scholarship, David elected to pursue academics over athletics and enrolled in The Ohio State University. His attendance at Ohio State coincided with the Woody Hayes “three yards and a cloud of dust” era of Ohio State Football. For part of his student life, he even lived in a special dormitory inside Ohio Stadium; his interest in the team remained throughout his life.

In 1974, David graduated from The Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine. He and his brother Paul, a classmate of his in the graduating vet school class, headed west to Fort Collins, Colo., to begin a one year internship at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Living in Fort Collins, Colo., that year confirmed to him that Colorado would be his home. His path, however, to remaining in Fort Collins, Colo., would lead him first to Texas.

The School of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University in College Station in Texas was David’s next stop. There he earned his masters and PhD degrees, and became Board Certified in Theriogenology. In 1977, he was asked to join the Teaching Faculty at Texas A&M. More importantly, College Station was where he also met his beloved wife Lynne. They married in 1979 in Denton, Tex. Their first child, son Brandon, arrived in 1982. Daughter Bethany joined the family in 1986.

While in the midst of completing his degrees and lovingly caring for his growing family, he spent 14 years on faculty instructing veterinary students in large animal surgery and reproduction. David found reproduction, particularly genetic traits and hereditability, supremely interesting. In 1989, David received an invitation to join the faculty at the Colorado State University Teaching Hospital, which he accepted. He remained on faculty at CSU until 1994, at which time he entered private veterinary practice. More valued by David, however, was the fact that he had achieved his goal of returning to Colorado to raise his family. He and Lynne purchased a small family farm, 10 acres, in 1992, which remains in the family to this day. In 2000, David accepted a position as a National Team Leader within the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service (CSREES). In 2005, he switched agencies within the USDA to the Animal Plant Health and Inspection Service, Veterinary Services (APHIS/VS) to support the animal identification and animal disease traceability program. He worked to provide the Nation with a reliable, cost-effective and accurate system of animal identification, ranging from goats, cattle, horses, swine, sheep, and even aquaculture, so that in the event of disease outbreak, epidemiological traceability would be ensured.

Dave wrote the “Vet Column” for the Fence Post for nearly 20 years. By David’s best guess, he trained more than 2,500 veterinarians over the course of his 20 year career in academia and maintained mentor relationships with any student who chose to keep in touch and pick his ample mind from time to time. As a veterinarian, he always strove to provide sound, practical, and thoughtful advice to clients, but importantly, also to anyone who expressed interest in simply “knowing more.” Most recently, David worked tirelessly to ensure a healthy and viable livestock population through advocating public policy on animal disease traceability and continuing to offer advice based on sound scientific facts.

He was affectionately known as “Dr. Dave”, our husband and father. We deeply and unimaginably grieve his loss, yet find solace in the knowledge that he was called upon by his Lord and Savior while under a blue Colorado sky, just moments after he finished caring for his beloved herd of beef cattle.

He is survived by his loving and devoted wife of 32 years, Lynne; his son Brandon, and his daughter, Bethany; his mother Nellie Lizabeth Morris and brother, Paul Gary Morris, DVM.

He was preceded in death by his father, John Franklin Morris.

Memorial services were held August 8, 2011 at Allnutt Funeral Service in Fort Collins, Colo.

Interment was in Resthaven Memory Gardens in Fort Collins, Colo.